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Documents filtered by: Period="Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
Results 1851-1860 of 1,860 sorted by editorial placement
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The Biography of M r Vander Kemp would require a Volume which I could not write if a Mil l ion were offered me as a Reward for the Work. After a learned and Scientific Education he entered the Army in Holland and Served as a Captain, with Reputation: but loving Books more than Arms he resigned his Commission and became a Preacher. My Acquaintance with him commenced at Leyden in 1780. He was...
D r James Freeman , is a learned, ingenious, honest and benevolent Man, who wishes to See President Jefferson , and requests me to introduce him. If you would introduce Some of your Friends to me, I could with more confidence introduce mine to You. He is a Christian, but not a Pythagorian a Platonick or a Philonick Christian. You will ken him and he will ken You: but you may depend, he will...
The Seconds of Life, that remain to me, are So few and So Short; (and they Seem to me Shorter and Shorter every minute) that I cannot Stand upon Epistolary Ettiquette: And though I have written two Letters , yet unnoticed I must write a third. Because I am not acquainted with any Man on this Side of Montecello , who can give me any Information upon Subjects that I am now analysing and...
Your letter, dear Sir, of May 6. had already well explained the Uses of grief, that of Sep. 3. with equal truth adduces instances of it’s abuse; and when we put into the same scale these abuses, with the afflictions of soul which even the Uses of grief cost us, we may consider it’s value in the economy of the human being, as equivocal at least. those afflictions cloud too great a portion of...
Your Letter of Oct. 14 has greatly obliged me. Tracy s A a n alysis, I have read once; and wish to read it a Second time. It Shall be returned to you. But I wish to be informed whether this Gentleman is of that Family of Tracy s with which the Marquis La Fayette is connected by intermariages.? I have read, not only the Analysis, but Eight Volumes out of 12 of The origine de tous les Cultes,...
I recieve here, dear Sir, your favor of the 4 th just as I am preparing my return to Monticello for winter quarters; and I hasten to answer to some of your enquiries. the Tracy I mentioned to you is the one connected by marriage with La Fayette ’s family. the mail which brought your letter brought one also from him . he writes me that he is become blind & so infirm that he is no longer able to...
I return the Analysis of Dupuis with my thanks for the loan of it. It is but a faint Miniature of the original. I have read that original in twelve Volumes, besides a 13 th of plates . I have been a Lover and a Reader of Romances all my Life. From Don Quixotte and Gill Blas to the Scottish Chiefs and an hundred others. For the last year or two I have devoted myself to this kind of Study: and...
Your Letter dear Sir of Nov. 15 from Poplar Forrest was Sent to me from the Post Office the next day after I had Sent “ The Analysis ” with my Thanks to you. “3. Vol s of Idiology!” Pray explain to me this Neological Title! What does it mean? When Bonaparte used it, I was delig h ted with it, upon the Common Principle of delight in every Thing We cannot understand. Does it mean Idiotism? The...
Forty three volumes read in one year, and 12. of them quartos! dear Sir, how I envy you! half a dozen 8 vos in that space of time are as much as I am allowed. I can read by candlelight only, and stealing long hours from my rest; nor would that time be allowed me indulged to me, could I, by that light, see to write. from sun-rise to one or two aclock, and often from dinner to dark, I am...
In our good old English language of Gratitude, I owe you and give you a thousand thanks, for Tracy ’s Review of Montesquieu which M r Dufief has Sent me by your order. I have read an hu n dred pages, and will read the rest. He is a Sensible Man and is easily understood. He is not an abstruse misterious incomprehensi ble Condorcet . Though I have banished the Subject from my thoughts for many...