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Documents filtered by: Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
Results 551-570 of 570 sorted by editorial placement
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The distance between Us, the total retirement in which I live and the Want of Facts, render a Correspondence between Us, upon public affairs of very little use to you, though it is a great pleasure to me. The Storm that has agitated the Elements for twenty Years in Europe must be drawing towards a Conclusion, and the last blasts may be the fiercest of all. We have been favoured by Providence...
As I know you hold a higher Rank in the intellectual Scale and a more estimable Situation in the moral Gradations of the Universe than Admiral Nelson, I know of no reason why I should not borrow his Fathers Epithets and for once or twice bestow them upon you. I, who perhaps ought to be indifferent to all Things in this World, and certainly Should conscientiously resign all Men Measures and...
I have already written you a very long letter in answer to your favour of the 8th: instt:—and after writing it, upon reading it over concluded the best disposition I could make of it would be to burn it—Accordingly the flames have consumed it, and I must begin again. Your answers and observations upon my inquiries respecting the impressment of our seamen by the British are of the highest...
Since you will not allow me the whole of Parson Nelsons Epithets for his Son I will insist upon retaining the better half of them. Nothing was farther from my intention than to underrate the Character of Admiral Nelson. I can Subscribe to all that you Say in his praise: yet I would not exchange Sons with the Parson, though the Admiral were still living with all his Wealth, Virtues, Titles and...
In Answer to your Letter of the 27 of January I request you to make Provision for Advancing me, by Mr Shaw one thousand one hundred and twenty five dollars and fifty Cents, or thereabout, which is the amount of an Obligation I owe to Miss Thaxter, or if you choose and I think there is but one remaining due to that Family. Your Mother has written you on the Subject of Caucus’s. I am not of her...
Livy in his 42. Book and chapters 29 and thirty, as an introduction of his History of the War between the Romans and Perseus King of Macedonia, says that all the Kings and States of Europe and Asia had their Attention fixed upon those two powerfull Nations upon the Point of engaging in War. He first explains the Views of the Kings Eumenes, Prusias, Ariarathes, Antiochus, Ptolomy, Massinissa,...
Your luminous Letter of the 27th of Feb. and 6. March are is before me. Was this an homogenious Nation under a consolidated Government, the Provision in the Constitution of Massachusetts would be Sufficient. But in a Confederation like ours there is danger. In Holland they have thought unanimity necessary in all most every Thing. Under our old Confederation, a Concurrence of nine States out of...
In your favour of March 25th. you express a hope that nothing like a distribution of Money, among the Principal Leaders of our Parties, has occurred or will occur, among Us. I agree with you in this hope and I will add that I Still entertain this belief. At least there is no one, on whom I can fasten even a Suspicion. But that foreign Money has been received by Sebastian, has been adjudged:...
You ask me whether “an armed Vessel of a belligerent Nation has a right to search a vessel of a neutral.” I answer No, except for contraband of war. This exception is established by the law and practice of nations; and confirmed by Treaties. But there is no right to search for men. The King of England acknowledges that he has no right to search for men a neutral ship of war even for deserters...
I thank you for your agreeable letter of 31st March from Albany. Grumbles at the Embargo appear to me to be mere electioneering artifices. The orders and Proclamations of the King of England, and the Decrees of the Emperor of France at Berlin and Milan, ought to be and would be an embargo, if our Government had not interfered. Perhaps some Merchants would have adventured; but it would have...
I request the favour of you to insert the foregoing Letter in the next Anthology. It is a material Document in the Life of Washington, as well as in mine and my Sons. As I was bitterly reproached for promoting my Son, though I never did promote him, but only removed him with the same Rank and Appointment from Lisbon to Berlin, Washingtons Letter ought to have been considered as a Justification...
It gives me great pleasure to observe in your letter of the first of this month your increasing thirst for knowledge and attachment to your profession. Your natural aversion to politics will soon too soon wear away. A lawyer must be a politician. It is impossible to avoid it; he breathes constantly in a political atmosphere. The companies with whom he associates are all politicians. Judges,...
I owe you a thousand thanks, to speak in the good old English form of civility, for the Speech and the documents. You are greatly to be pitied, I mean all of you, of all parties, for I see you must labour very hard and with much anxiety, without the smallest hope, that I can discern of preserving yourselves and us the people from very dull times. If you continue the Embargo the times will be...
It is a long time since I had a Letter from you. In the last I think you prophesied “Wonders in November.” I understood you to mean, a wonderful revolution in the sentiments of the people, and a restoration of the Federalists to the Government of the Nation. But the month of November is past, and there appears, notwithstanding all the terrors and horrors of the Embargo a wonderfull adherence...
Your favour of the 25th: found me, in the midst of parliamentary contest, which occupied me too intensely to admit of that early acknowledgment, which a deep sense of the honour, you have conferred on me, dictated. The battle has raged, with some warmth; and it has been my fate, to be in the hottest of it. Whether my exertions were as wise, as, I am sure, they were, well intended, I confess, I...
I thank you for all the fine Speeches you send me and especially for that of Mr Loyd and the letter of the 14th. inclosed with it. The Speech is a chaste, neat composition, very Sensible, candid, frank and manly. I conclude with him “remove the Embargo, authorize the Merchants to arm their Vessels, put the Nation in a State of defence and assert your well established and indisputable Rights or...
I am astonished, on recurring to my files, at finding that your favour of the 23d. Ulto. has lain by me, so long, unanswered. I shall not recapitulate reasons, nor invent apologies. I know that your goodness will supply both, and find a cause of delay, any where, rather than in a want of a deep sense of the honour & of the value of your correspondence. Both of which, you know me well enough to...
Being informed that our Mediterranean Passports and papers of navigation have been recently counterfeited and used by persons not entitled to them, and being referred to you for explanations respecting it, permit me to request you to make a deposition reciting your knowledge of the subject as circumstantially as may be and especially what you know respecting the interest Mr. Willis the...
Th: Jefferson presents his respects to mr Adams and incloses him a letter which came to his hands last night; on reading what is written within the cover, he concluded it to be a private letter, and without opening a single paper within it he folded it up & now has the honor to inclose it to mr Adams, with the homage of his high consideration & respect. RC ( MHi : Adams Papers); addressed:...
I have recd your favour of March 8 with the Letter inclosed, for which I thank you. Inclosed is a Letter to one of your Domesticks Joseph Dougherty , Had you read the Papers inclosed they might have given you a moment of Melancholly or at least of Sympathy with a mourning Father. They relate wholly to the Funeral of a Son who was once the delight of my Eyes and a darling of my heart, cutt off...