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There are two Sentences in Talleyrand’s Letter of the 28th of August, 1798 which ought not to pass unnoticed, the first “In France it was Supposed that the Government of the United States, wished only the appearances of a Negotiation, whence resulted a certain demand for Pledges of good Faith” The Second is “Can it be believed that a Man who should profess a hatred or Contempt of the French...
John Adams with his Consort and their Family desire prayers that the death of a grandchild may be Sanctified to them. They also request your Prayers for their Children and grand Children, in remote Countries abroad and distant parts at home, that thir Lives and health may be preserved from dangers by Sea and land and in due time returned in Safety to their Country and their Friends. ICN .
You very well know, that the Publication of my Letters in Pamplets and Numbers, was a project of your own, without any previous Knowledge or Consent of mine. You had an undoubted write right to do this or to make any this Use of them or any other you pleased; because I had given them to you and to the World. But in your “Introductory Remarks by the Publishers” to the first number you have...
I have recieved your favour of February 23rd and thank you for the friendly as well as the complimentary sentiments expressed in it It has been now and then my fortune in the course of a long life, though not frequently to receive a compliment. yours is a pleasant one; and as an instance of adversity seldom comes alone, so I have observed that an instance of prosperity is seldom quite...
BORN and educated in the same state which has given birth to you, and to which our hearts are tied by the dearest and most sacred ties; we address you in the name of this our common country, at a time, in our opinion most ominous, and threatening the destruction of our rights, liberty and happiness. We look up to you in the name and in behalf of many in the interior of Massachusetts, for...
Your favor of the 19th. of February was alike acceptable with all your former letters. The papers will inform you that our government is about to yeild to the Clamors of your part of the United States against the Embargo laws. Had our Legislators been better historians they would have promptly saved their honor, and preserved the peace of our Country. Augustus repealed a law to compel...
I wrote to you under the date of the 20th. inst. and sent it to the post office, but arriving there a few minutes too late to be forwarded by the mail it was returned. I now forward it under cover with this. There is a sentence in your favour of the 11th. demanding my particular attention:—“When you told me,” you observe, “that my Letter had been a topick at Boston, and given rise to free...
When I consider, I was once a Pupil at Braintree in the mansion House of your venerable Father, I claim a Sort of Right to Indugence to address you, which your wontted Benevolence will not deny me; Time, I dare say, has not yet effaced the Remembrance of the little Phamphlet , intitled, “ Tears of the Serv’edors ” and another intitled The Progress of civil & rational Liberty . Through those...
Inclosed you will find a phillipic of our angry, pevish, fretful Prophet Jonah. His anger is his talent. When he gives a loose to that passion which he always does in every thing he produces something smart, pert, and malignant, which pleases the malignaty of the vulgar. But Phillipics are not the highest style of politicks. I cannot think Demosthenes and Cicero in the highest grade of...
When you informed me that Mr Cooper in his Life of Dr Priestly had ascribed to that Philosopher, the first hint of the Perfectibility of the human Mind, I answered you that this was the Doctrine of the ancient Stoicks. My Memory did not Serve me with details and I referred to no authorities, not thinking it worth while to Search Books upon Such a Subject. But within a day or two I have...
Your favours of the 11th. and 14th. inst. came both to hand to-day. I have only time, by this mail, to make this acknowledgment, and to request of you the goodness to send me what you have written on a point controverted between yourself and the person whose pertinacity you have found so unmanageable. The engagements, on my part, which you have proposed as conditional to its reception, I most...
Soon after the receipt of your last letter in which you Advise me to shake off my retired habits and prejudices, and to come forward in Support of the petitions of my fellow Citizens for a repeal of the Embargo laws, I went to bed at my usual hour, and dreamed that I had yeilded to your Advice; and in consequence of it, determined to appear at a federal town meeting which was to be held the...
I have yours of the 18. Jan. When you receive your Diploma you will have no fees to pay. We have not yet adopted any regulation which requires fees from the Members elected. Perhaps it would be prudent in future to adopt Such a Measure and give a Salary to our Secretary. Our Officers are now Men of So much Business and So dependent on their Business for the Support of their families that they...
The complaint in your favour of the 11th, of the refusal to publish your Chathams, is no suprise to me. I have seen nothing in the four federal papers of Boston, for the last year, but such another prostitution, of genius, learning, and eloquence, as We read in Madam Drapers, Fleets, and mien, and Flemmings Papers in 1773 and 1774. A blind devotion to England and a disposition to sacrifice to...
I have your favour of 14 ult. The Mirror was never read—and if it ever should be it will be willfully misunderstood—Seventeen Wheels within one wheel. Seventeen Empires within one empire Seventeen sovereignties within one sovereignty. Seventeen Imperia in one Emperio will tell in time we have had a Chaise’s disturbance: a Gallatin’s disturbance a Fries’s disturbance; and why may we not have a...
The last Letter which I had the honour to receive from you, dated Jan. 3d. I have before acknowledged. Permit me to remind you, that, I have in expectation something farther from you concerning the misnamed Aristides. I am perfectly ashamed to speak to you again of my Chathams, but it is unavoidable. The three concluding numbers the printers refuse to publish. In two of them, I embodied the...
If our friend as you say is writhing in a Fox trap those who as you say nibbled when I sent Elsworth to France have woven the meshes with great art. They have composed the snares of the cords of a man and the bands of Love. They have exerted themselves with success equal to thier zeal and activity to get his son Theodore elected, into the senate and his son in Law Bailies into the H——of R——of...
Our Lincoln is wreathing in the Fox-trap of pretended-Friends. And the desendants of those Same Mice, who nibbled you when you sent good-Ellsworth to France, have been Striving to make holes in a Small Mole-hill here . I long to have in a proper “Hole,” Some of that “Sweet Converse” with you which the now-cautious Demos extorted into a rascally Public Gazette Chronicle. But, Sir, the Set-time...
I am favoured with your kind Letter of the 20th. At your age and mine, as the Body fails to Supply Such plentifull provisions of animal Spirit, as it commonly does in youth and middle Age. We are usually Subject to more frequent dejections and gloomy Apprehensions. In the present dreary times you are not alone but accompanied by the whole Nation as far as I know it, in your depression. But not...
What Signify Clamours against Commerce Property Kings Nobles Demagogues Democracy, the Clergy Religion? For to each and all of these has the Depravity of Man been imputed by some Philosophers. Rousseau says the first Man who fenced a Cabbage yard ought to have been put to death. Dr but Diderot says the first Man who Suggested the Idea of a god ought to have been treated as an Enemy of the...
I have not had the pleasure to receive a Line from you in Some time—Did you know what pleasure your letter gave me and how they Chiered my Old heart in these Drary times of Our Country your humanity and friendly disposition Would Often raise My Druping Spirits—for lete Me assure you Sir, they have been Sadly Depressed Since your Son gave up his year in the Senate. Especially this Season when...
Your Letter of the 31 Dec. last delighted me more than usual. It was a new mark of your affectionate esteem—it assured me of your continued health; It was an evident proof that I was not yet left alone. Last year has again bereft me of a worthy friend; and I can not longer fill up the empty place with others, ere long, if mÿ days are to be prol onged, I Shall mourn them in mÿ Solitude where,...
I am astonished, on recurring to my files, at finding that your favour of the 23d. Ulto. has lain by me, so long, unanswered. I shall not recapitulate reasons, nor invent apologies. I know that your goodness will supply both, and find a cause of delay, any where, rather than in a want of a deep sense of the honour & of the value of your correspondence. Both of which, you know me well enough to...
I received, on the last day of December, the 2d. and 3d. volumes of the Defence, for which I renew my thanks. You have truly characterized this work in the comparison you have made of it, in your Letter of the 3d. inst. to a Boudoir. Many of the evils which you have described as incident to an unbalanced government, we have found by experience to have been insufficiently guarded against by our...
In a situation such as you have seen a Sea Captain in a Gale of Wind, I sit down to acknowledge the receipt of your two last instructing letters. Present events will justify your opinion of the present measures of our rulers. Your Account of the pernicious influence of a belief in the time in Which the prophesies are to be fulfilled is to much opposed to the System of the divine government...
The last letter, which I had the honour to receive from you, dated January 3d, I have before acknowledged. Permit me to remind you, that I have in expectation something farther from you, concerning the misnamed Aristides. I am perfectly ashamed to speak to you again of my Chathams, but it is unavoidable. The three concluding numbers, the printers refuse to publish. In two of them I had...
The following comments were written, within a few days after the appearance in public of this Text “The Proclamation of the King of Great Britain requiring the return of his Subjects, the Seamen especially, from foreign Countries, to aid, in this hour of peculiar danger, in defence of their own. But it being an acknowledged Principle that every Nation has a right to the Service of its Subjects...
Your Excellent Communication of the 26th. Ult. is highly appreciated among our friend here; and I do think, it would Expand it’s beneficial Effects, on the Affairs of our Nation if it’s contents could be published. But as I have no leave from you to do it, I shall feel my self bound not to do it.—Please Sir, to Accept my most cordial thanks for your goodness in making the Communication. I am...
I have your favours of December 17, and 21st. I hope you will not insinuate a comparison between John Q. Adams and Coriolanus. Whatever injustice or ingratitude may be done him, he has none of the Roman’s revenge, much less his treachery. Of Mrs. Warren’s History I have nothing to say. The Count De Vergennes was an accomplished gentleman and scholar, and a statesman of great experience in...
In answer to your kind Inquiries concerning my health, in your favour of the 14th, I can inform you that I enjoy as good health as a Man in his fifteenth Lustre, can reasonably expect, except a little paralytic trembling in the hands, which does not much incommode me however in Writing. I have been engaged this Summer as you have in reading History. Voltaires Moeurs et Esprit des Nations and...
Enclosed is a News-paper containing, under the Worcester head, a copy of some remarks made at a Meeting of this Town. The author is so plainly indicated by the style of his address, and by his initial, that it is unnecessary, and might appear ostentatious, to be more particular. With affection and gratitude, / I am, Dear Sir, / Your Friend & Servt. MHi : Adams Papers.
I receive very kindly your obliging letter of the 15th. of this month. Ever since my return from Europe, where I had resided ten years and could not be fully informed of the state of affairs in my own Country, I have been constantly anxious and alarmed at the intemperance of party spirit and the unbounded license of our presses. In the same view I could not but lament some things, which have...
Your obliging letter of November 30. 1807. I had the pleasure of receiving, soon after its date, containing a copy of Latin Verses &c. in your own hand writing. Such a compliance with my wishes fills my heart with grateful emotions. It adds a stimulous to my exertions to be useful. You will please to accept my thankful acknowledgements. At your request, I present you a translation of the...
I thank you for all the fine Speeches you send me and especially for that of Mr Loyd and the letter of the 14th. inclosed with it. The Speech is a chaste, neat composition, very Sensible, candid, frank and manly. I conclude with him “remove the Embargo, authorize the Merchants to arm their Vessels, put the Nation in a State of defence and assert your well established and indisputable Rights or...
I know not whether I shall make you smile or weep, excite your ridicule or pity or contempt when I reveal to you the mistery of my long delay to answer your last Letters. But before I unriddle that unusual negligence, I must say a few words concerning our Friend Whartons Attachment to Prophecies and his habit of applying them to passing events. I have no objection to the Study, but I am aware...
I have received your favour of the 13th. inst. and give you my thanks for the offer of the 2d. & 3d. volumes of the Defence. If you would be at the trouble of putting them under a blank cover, superscribed with my address and cause them to be left at Wheelock’s, at the sign of the Indian Queen in Marlborough-Street, they will be brought to me by the driver of the Leominster stage— I shall be...
I was highly gratified by the receipt of the letter of the 9th instant which you did me the honor to write me. Your Approbation of the Reply to the Legislature of Massachusetts, and of the measures of the General Government was extremely flattering. The crisis is highly important, but I trust and hope that the Almighty Guardian of America will still protect her against the open attacks and...
Since I enjoyed the pleasure of addressing you on the 10th. inst. I have seen two numbers of the Palladium and found them both silent respecting Mr. J. Q. A. Doubtful whether the Editors would publish my encomium on him I retained a copy, which is subjoined, and which shall release your patience from any farther tax on that subject. “The causes of the Embargo originating unperceived, and...
Having seen a Letter over your Signature, Addressed to Mr. Green, I feel myself constrain’d to return You my most Grateful Acknowledgement, for the high & Respectful Compliment, which you have been pleased to pay, bestow, on our Reply to the Resolutions of the Resolutions of the Massachusetts Legislature. We conceived it a duty, we Owed to Ourselves, to Our Constituents, and to Our Country, to...
Has your right hand forgotten its Cunning from pain or Sickness? or have you ceased to contemplate the present interesting Crisis of your beloved Country?—or have you become fearful of committing your apprehensions of her future destiny to paper? If none of these events have come to pass, why am I not favoured with Answers to my two last letters?— Say my dear and venerable friend what is to be...
Tho I have actuallÿ nothing interesting to communicate, your kindness Shall make mÿ apologÿ, when I indulge a wish of Sending you a few lines. I hope, your health remains unimpaired—and your domestic enjoyments unaltered. These valuable blessings are indeed the utmost, which we can aim to attain here—To live alone for the Public—to endeavor to make Nations wise—and happÿ—approaches...
It is a long time since I had a Letter from you. In the last I think you prophesied “Wonders in November.” I understood you to mean, a wonderful revolution in the sentiments of the people, and a restoration of the Federalists to the Government of the Nation. But the month of November is past, and there appears, notwithstanding all the terrors and horrors of the Embargo a wonderfull adherence...
Your favour of the 25th: found me, in the midst of parliamentary contest, which occupied me too intensely to admit of that early acknowledgment, which a deep sense of the honour, you have conferred on me, dictated. The battle has raged, with some warmth; and it has been my fate, to be in the hottest of it. Whether my exertions were as wise, as, I am sure, they were, well intended, I confess, I...
I laughed when I read your Expectation, that what you had written on J. Q. A. would be printed. I found that you was not acquainted with the World, as it exists in Boston. The four federal Papers are under the Imprimatur of an Oligarchy of Purse, proud Speculators as despotic as the thirty Tyrants of Athens. Tryals enough have been made, as I have been informed to insert many Things on the...
I had the pleasure to write you the 3d. inst. I follow it with this to make the explanation of the concluding part of that letter which subsequent discoveries have made necessary. I mentioned a particular object as my inducement to a public notice of Mr. J. Q. A., in the thirteenth number of certain speculations, but it appears that the occasion I intended to influence has gone by in advance...
I received, yesterday, from the Post Office, under your franc, the nervous Reply of Nine of our Representatives to the certain resolutions. Having read it with pleasure I thank you for your politeness in Sending it to me. while it treats our Legislature with all the respect it deserves, it is written with as much candor and moderation as perspicuity and Energy. The Facts are fairly stated, and...
Your favour of the 25th. ult. came duly to hand. What you have already confided to me concerning Mr. P. and what more you may have the goodness to disclose, I shall not impart to any one. I repeat this assurance to relieve the solicitude which I perceive you cherish to have me sensibly impressed with the delicacy and importance of the communications, with which you have honoured me. I hope,...
I have your favour’s of the 12th and 16th: of the month. The letter of President Washington concerning J Q A. is at your discretion to make what use of it you please. All the communications concerning the other Gentleman made or to be made I confide to your sacred confidence. The great regard I had for your Grandfather and for your Grandmother, who was a beloved Sister of my Mother, and for...
I owe you a thousand thanks, to speak in the good old English form of civility, for the Speech and the documents. You are greatly to be pitied, I mean all of you, of all parties, for I see you must labour very hard and with much anxiety, without the smallest hope, that I can discern of preserving yourselves and us the people from very dull times. If you continue the Embargo the times will be...
The person who carried to the office my the letter which I had the pleasure to write to you the 12th. inst. brought me yours of the 9th. You may depend, most assuredly, that your disclosures concerning the ci devant Secretary, shall not be divulged while you live, and may the day be distant which shall discharge me to my discretion in the use of the important matter you have deposited in my...