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    • Adams, John Quincy
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    • Jefferson Presidency
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    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
Results 11-20 of 44 sorted by date (ascending)
The third chapter of the book upon the State of France, concerns the relative situation of France, with regard to her allies. It begins with a magnificent eulogium upon that country, for her great exertions in former ages against the domineering ambition of the court of Rome, of the Venetian Republic, and of the house of Austria successively. There can be no doubt, but that the efforts of...
I have received, and communicated to this Government, my recall from the mission here—I shall hasten my departure as much as possible; but the situation of my wife who is still confined to her bed, renders it uncertain when she will be able to travel at all, and yet more when to undertake the voyage. If a favourable opportunity from Hamburg for Boston occurs I shall give it the preference—But...
Mr: Welsh proposes to return home by the way of Amsterdam, and will be the bearer of this letter—With it, I enclose the 4th: number of the Gazette, and copies of former letters to yourself and to my dear mother. I wish I could promise myself a more speedy departure than that which I anticipated in my last letter to you; but we can no longer form a hope of my wife’s immediate recovery—There is...
I continue as long as possible to send you my gazette; but I now hope in the course of three weeks to leave Berlin—I have written to engage a passage for myself and family, on board the Catherine, Captain Ingersoll; from Hamburg for New–York. No opportunity for Boston occurs from that place; nor do I know of any from Bremen or either of the dutch ports—Besides which the journey from New–York...
No. I. 28th March 1801 Publication Date 6 June 1801 Dear Sir, I send you by this opportunity a French pamphlet, entitled, “ Bacon As He Is ; or, Denunciation of a French Translation of his Works, published at Dijon, by M. Ant. La Salle—By I. A. De Luc, Reader to the Queen of Great-Britain; Fellow of the Royal Societies, of London and Dublin; Member of the Society of Naturalists, at Berlin; of...
After a passage of 58 days from Hamburg we have this day landed here, where we purpose to stay five or six days—My wife will then go to spend a few weeks with her parents at Washington, and I shall hasten towards Quincy where I hope within three weeks to present myself before you—Her health though yet very infirm is better than we could have expected, and your little Grandson is as hearty as...
I have very much regretted, my dear Sir, that the severity of the Season has deprived us of the pleasure of spending the Sunday with you for so many weeks; but it affords me some consolation that you have found so agreeable a companion in La Harpe, whose work I was well assured would prove a great source of entertainment to you—The volumes containing his account of the philosophy of the 18th:...
The enclosed letter being from Mr: King, I apprehended might enclose one to me, from the gentlemen at Amsterdam; as I had forwarded letters upon your affairs through him to them—I therefore took the liberty of breaking the seal—But finding only open papers within, I now enclose the whole to you—I have not presumed to look into the contents. Yours faithfully MHi : Adams Papers.
Since writing the within letter, I have seen Coll. Smith, who informs me that my Sister will probably have left you before this arrives—So I shall direct the whole to you. My wife has so far recovered that we think of going on this day as far as Elizabeth Town, and hope to proceed further on our journey to-morrow. But She is still so weak, that I am not a little apprehensive on her account—...
This prohibition of the admission of slaves into Louisiana, is like the drawing of a jaw tooth—We have expedient after expedient introduced to answer this purpose—Breckenridge has at last concentrated all his wisdom on the subject in the Amendment, which I now inclose you. This is a tolerably good device to reconcile the two parties of slave and anti-slave into which the majority are divided....