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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Period="Adams Presidency" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
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your dearest Friend never had a more trying day than Yesterday. A Solenm Scene it was indeed and it was made more affecting to me, by the Presence of the General, whose Countenance was as serene and unclouded as the day. He Seem’d to me to enjoy a Tryumph over me. Methought I heard him think Ay! I am fairly out and you fairly in! see which of Us will be happiest. When the Ceremony was over he...
I have no Letter this Week and begin to fear that your Respect to our late P. has laid a foundation for a Sick Spring and Summer. Sometimes too I am jealous of unfair Play in the Post office to prevent me from hearing from you at the most critical Period of my Life. The public Papers must give you an Account of Proceedings, which I am wholly unable to describe. What Judgment is form’d of my...
Yesterday only I rec d yours of March 1.— am surprized you should have rec d none from me from 11. Feb. I have written never less than once a Week, seldom less than twice and 9 Weeks out of 10, three times, ever Since I left you. The Roads or some irregularity of the Post must have occasioned your disappointment. I hope you will obtain Mr Mears, but I must leave every Thing to you— The Load of...
I am So constantly engaged in Business most of which is new to me, that it Seems as if it was impossible to find time to write even to you— Yet I believe I write every Post. It proves to be a tedious Business to clear the Presidents house for me. I am now told it will not be ready this Week. You will See by the Gazette how the new Pensilvania House is disposed of. The Weather is bad— I have a...
I have yours of the 6 th. by the Post of this day. I have proposed to Brisler to give him 300 dollars and pay the Expences of his Wife and Children to this Place and back again to Quincy, when they return— And He and his Wife and Children are to live in the Family. This is pretty well— I must and will have him. I am peremptorily for excluding all blacks and Molattoes. I hope to get into the...
Last night for the first time I slept in our new House.— But what a Scene! The Furniture belonging to the Publick is in the most deplorable Condition— There is not a Chair fit to sit in. The Beds and Bedding are in a woeful Pickle. This House has been a scene of the most scandalous Drunkenness and Disorder among the servants, that ever I heard of. I would not have one of them for any...
You will See by the Proclamation in the Public Papers that I have been obliged to convene Congress on the 15 th of May, and as it is probable they will Sitt till the Middle of July, this measure must make an entire change in all our Arrangements There are so many Things to do in furnishing the House in which I want your Advice, and on so many other Accounts it is improper We should live in a...
M r Murray of Maryland, your old Friend, with whom you form’d your first acquaintance at the Hague is to Succeed you. That Gentleman has been So long a Member of Congress and has given Such Proofs of Talents, amiable dispositions, and patriotic Sentiments, as qualify him to do honour to the Mission, as well as to his Predecessor. It would have been enough to have Said that he is well chosen to...
I am very much concerned, least you as well as your Brother, should think hard of me, for neglecting so long to write to you, but the multiplied Cares and engagements of Life added to indifferent health must plead my Excuse M r: Murray is to take the place of your Brother, and M r. Dandridge is to be his private Secretary, your brother will go to Lisbon, and you I hope will return to...
Monday Morning, the most agreable in the Week because it brings me Letters from you, has not failed me to day. I have yours of 23 and 25 March. The Correspondence with Plymouth amused me much— The Answer is Superiour to the Letter both in Delicacy, and keenness.— You might have told her, if Chance decides in Elections, it is no better than Descent. But she knows not what she wants. The Letter...
I rec d. to day your favour of March 29 th. I write you every Post day and send my Letter to the office. If they do not come regularly to you it must be owing to the office. It would hurt me to refuse the request of my Nephew Elisha Adams: but you gave him and his Mother all the Answer in your Power. If D r Tufts has any Money of mine in his hands, I should be glad if he would Supply my Nephew...
Your Letter of the 31. of March made me unhappy because it convinced me that you were so. I Attribute the Cause of it all however, to the dangerous illness of Cousin Polly Smith which I am very sorry to her. The Deaths and dangerous sicknesses of your near Relations and intimate friends always affect your tender and benevolent heart with very deep and affectionate Impressions. I hope she may...
I have this day been obliged to take a serious and painful measure in the removal of the Collector of Newyork, and I wish you to give me your opinion concerning a successor— The office is important and lucrative, Walker has been named to me. What think you of him? I must and will have a good Federalist, one who will not prostitute his office, to a Foreign faction, or a domestic one,— I am &c a...
I have this day rec d , in your favours of the 5. 6. and 7 th. of the month the first Acknowledgment of the Receipt of my Invitations to you to come to Philadelphia and share in the Burthens of your friend. I hope you may have commenced your Journey before this day: but knowing how many dispositions you have to make, and how difficult it will be to make them I cannot promise myself the...
as soon as your Letter informed Us that M rs Brisler could not come without her husband I sent him off, in two hours, the day before Yesterday, i.e Monday. There has been Such a snow storm ever since that he must have had a bad Journey to N. York— Whether he will wait there for a Wind for Rhode Island or take the stage I know not but hope he will get home before you come away. This days Post...
I had no Letter from you Yesterday. As You intended to commence your Journey on the 24 th. it is not probable this Letter will meet you, till it returns to this Place. But as it is possible you might not be able to set out so soon, you may receive it at Quincy. Brisler is at Quincy before this, I hope. Charles is just gone, for N. York— I have communicated to him my Plan of sending my Coachman...
This day you promis’d me to begin your Journey: but if the Weather is as disagreable with you as it is here, I could not exact the fullfillment of the Engagement. I fear you will have bad roads and unpleasant Weather. You talk of your Perplexities and say you must get out of them yourself. Do you think mine less severe, public or private? My dear and venerable Mother— Alass— I feel for her.—...
Your Letters of the 21. 22. 23. and 26 of April are all before me— They have inspired me with all the Melancholly in which they were written. Our Mother and our Niece are gone to rest. The first a fruit fully ripe the last but a blossom or a bud.— I have Suffered for you as much as you have Suffered— But I could give you no Aid or Amusement or Comfort.— I pray God that these dispensations may...
Your Brother is appointed to Berlin, but you I presume will soon return to America; perhaps you may be upon your passage, and this Letter may not reach you, before You Sail I long to see you, but yet I am Very sensible it must be a cruel separation to your Brother— Who he can obtain for a Secretary I know not. The family is all here, and are as happy as the absence of all our Children, and the...
I arrived here this Evening with your Mother and Cozen all in good health, and was Sorry to hear that you went from hence on Monday unwell. I hope you are better. If I go into Town in Ceremony I Should be glad of your Company with me in my Carriage. My Letters will, Some of them be directed to your Care, I Shall be glad to receive them as soon as possible. Can you Send them out by the Stage to...
I send you the Letters— I could not keep my hands off of Nabby’s. I beg her Pardon. They write me flattering Accounts from Phil a. M r Anthony writes most confidently. No danger. No fever—alls well.— When Brisler goes he should throw Lime into the Cellar Vault &c. I think We ought to have been together to day. But tomorrow will do. I am glad Malcom came out. We must prepare to go to Phil a....
The Newspapers had informed Us of your Marriage, but the first Evidence of it from yourself, was in your Letter to your Mother of the 29. July.— I congratulate you and your Lady on this Event, which I hope will be for your mutual Happiness and the Comfort of all the Friends of both Parties, for a long Course of years, dedicated to the Public— And may the Blessing of God Almighty be bestowed on...
I have rec d your charming narration of your Tour to Paris, both to me and your mother, and am happy to find you were so civilly treated and so well pleased. I shall never forget the kindness of my Friend Arnoux to myself or to you. I congratulate you, on your new Acquisition of a Sister. I Suppose this match grew out of a Spark that was kindled at Nantes in 1779 when your Brother was with me...
It was only Yesterday that I received your No. 44 of 22. July though I had rec d N o. 45 a few days before. When I nominated you to Berlin, your Mother had not rec d the Letter in which you mentioned your aversion to holding an office under my nomination. If I had known you had formed Such a resolution I should not have made any Alteration in your destination till I had written you on the...
I have received your favour of the 3 d and am much obliged to you for it and equally pleased with its Contents. I agree with you in opinion that it will be well to rebuild the Wall against Hardwick: to renew the Leases as soon as possible with French and Burrill, if they choose to do so, and to plough and cart manure as you propose. I am very glad the Meadow is ploughed. This is a great Point...
A Letter from my Nephew, M r: William Cranch of the City of Washington, informing me of your arrival, gives me an opportunity of congratulating you and M rs: Johnson and the young Ladies, on your good fortune in seeing your Native Country, after so long an Absence and so tedious a Voyage— I have at the same time to thank you for an amiable daughter, and to congratulate you, on the acquisition...
I have received the Letter you wrote me on the 7th of this month, and I shall give all the attention to the Subject of it which may be necessary. It is not new to me— You are too precipitate in my opinion in pronouncing an opinion that the General has been guilty of high Crimes &C a: There have not been wanting Critics upon your conduct, as severe as you have been upon his It is reported not...
I have received your favor of the 27th of March and very Kindly thank you, for both the Letter and the generous Present of a Cheese from Princeton, I know very well the Value that is to be attached to Princeton and its inhabitants and Productions, Its Cheese in particular I know to be Excellent, and I shall prize it the higher for the place of its growth, I shall share it, and boast of it, and...
We are much obliged to you for the opportunity to read the Letter of 13 of Feb. from our dear Thomas, which I now return. The Paragraphs useful to the Public were judiciously published. M rs. Adams desires me to wish you much felicity in your present and future Connections. The H. of R. have at length determined on their Address and to day at twelve I am to reply to it. They discovered at last...
When, in early times it was first perceived; in early times that no middle course remained for America remained; between unlimited submission to a foreign Legislature, and a total Independence of its claims: men of reflection, were less apprehensive of danger, from the formidable Power of fleets and Armies they must determine to resist; than from those Contests and dissentions, which would...