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    • Adams, John
    • Adams, Thomas Boylston

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Adams, John" AND Correspondent="Adams, Thomas Boylston"
Results 31-60 of 106 sorted by date (ascending)
I am extreamly sorry to hear that you have been ill of your old Complaint: but was somewhat consoled at the same time by hearing you were better. Exercise of Walking or riding will be your Life in Holland. Our Affairs are assuming a face of good Humour which is very pleasant after so long a storm. We shall have Peace and good Gov t for some Years I hope— I long to learn your Intentions about...
It is a long time Since I have rec d any Letter from you, and the Report that you have had a Return of your Rheumatism has allarmed me— We heard that you were better but should be glad to know the Particulars. I am once more happy at home, and my Farm, by the help of a fine rainy season shines very bright.— I Should be glad to be informed, of your Plans and Views— Whether You mean to return or...
It was no longer ago than Yesterday that I received your kind Letter of the 14. of December last, which arrived, after a long Passage, I Suppose, at Baltimore, and came from thence by the Post which carried them to Cape Cod and then returned them to Quincy. We have been anxious on your Account as We had rec d no Letter except your Letter of Introduction to M r De Persyn, and We heard you had...
Upon my file of unacknowledged letters, I find three from you, the last of which is of the 7 th: April and came to hand on the 21 st: inst t . The other two are of the 19 September and 13 December of the past year; and were received at a time when the state of my health rendered both mental and bodily exertion almost impossible to me. From the beginning of the last winter until very late in...
Since the date of my last letter, (June 24 th: ) I am favored with your’s of May 19. which gives the comfortable assurance of your safe return to Quincy. After the fatigues, vexations and anxiety, which a lengthy session of Congress always produces, I easily conceive the luxury of your enjoyment upon returning to your farm. There you meet the reward of your labors, by the appearance of...
Two days since I had the pleasure to receive your kind favors of the 9 th: June and 8 th: of August, which came by the way of England with one of the 16 th: August from my mother. I find by these, that my letter’s to you and my mother of the last of June, had not then been received, but they must have come to hand soon after, as I have an answer to a letter, which I wrote my brother at...
Your kind favors of October 28. & November 11. of the past year, have been some weeks in my possession. I am not, nor can I conveniently be, so good a correspondent as my brother, whose frequent and copious communications exhaust most of the subjects upon which I should feel disposed to write you myself, I think it is my duty nevertheless not to suffer any considerable period to pass, without...
I am very much concerned, least you as well as your Brother, should think hard of me, for neglecting so long to write to you, but the multiplied Cares and engagements of Life added to indifferent health must plead my Excuse M r: Murray is to take the place of your Brother, and M r. Dandridge is to be his private Secretary, your brother will go to Lisbon, and you I hope will return to...
Your Brother is appointed to Berlin, but you I presume will soon return to America; perhaps you may be upon your passage, and this Letter may not reach you, before You Sail I long to see you, but yet I am Very sensible it must be a cruel separation to your Brother— Who he can obtain for a Secretary I know not. The family is all here, and are as happy as the absence of all our Children, and the...
Since I came to this Country, two of your kind letters have reached me; one dated in June & the other in July; the latter came by Gen l: Marshall, but by some accident was not forwarded at the same time with your letter to my brother of the same date. It has only this day come to hand. Contrary to your expectation, as well as my own, your letters find me still in Europe, and about to embark in...
I have rec d your charming narration of your Tour to Paris, both to me and your mother, and am happy to find you were so civilly treated and so well pleased. I shall never forget the kindness of my Friend Arnoux to myself or to you. I congratulate you, on your new Acquisition of a Sister. I Suppose this match grew out of a Spark that was kindled at Nantes in 1779 when your Brother was with me...
Since my residence at this place I have received your kind letter of October 25 th: written at East Chester, a few weeks previous to your return to the seat of Government, from your nothern excursion. I have been highly delighted by the accounts which reached us from various quarters of the cordial & dignified reception given by the people to their chief magistrate, both in his going from &...
I left Berlin the 30th: ulto., and made rather a circuitous journey to this place, where I arrived the 10th: instt: and whence I purpose to embark for the United States in a very few days; most probably on board the same vessel that brought Mr: Welsh & which is bound to Newbury port—There are divers vessels going out to other ports, but except that by which this letter goes, none will probably...
I wrote you soon after my arrival here that I expected to take passage with Captain Jenkins of the Ship America, bound to Newburyport. I had in fact engaged to go with him, but as he said much to me of the uncomfortableness of his vessel and refused any compensation for taking me as a passenger, I thought best to look out for another opportunity, and upon the recommendation of Captn: Jenkins,...
I arrived at this place yesterday afternoon, in the Ship Alexander Hamilton, after a passage of 46 days—The Season of the year will best explain what kind of weather we have experienced. I thank God that I tread once more the land of my Fathers. I shall wait only for my baggage to come on shore and then set out for Philadelphia—where I hope to meet you in health. It gives me pain that I cannot...
The morning I left Philadelphia I had not an opportunity of making the necessary arrangement with the Secretary of State for the payment of my Brother’s salary, which the Secretary of the Treasury had promised to advance. I should be sorry that this circumstance should defeat my intention of subscribing to the loan on behalf of my Brother, the Sum of 4000 Dls: which each person, who subscribes...
I arrived at Boston on Monday evening after a prosperous journey, and came out to this place the following afternoon in the Quincy Stage. I had the happiness to find my Mother in tolerable health, and shall be highly rejoyced, if my presence, should in any degree contribute to the continuance of that blessing. The rest of our friends are well, excepting Uncle Adams, who suffers much from a...
My time has been so occupied between going to Boston to get my dinner and coming back to Quincy again, that I have written to you but once since my arrival. I should have considered these frequent visits as time lost to improvement, but that they have enabled me to attend the Session of the Supreme Court, which commenced on the 19th: ulto. Having now complied with all the necessary forms of a...
I arrived here safely yesterday forenoon, after an agreeable, though rather tardy passage from New-Port, which place we left on Sunday noon. During my stay at Newport, I visited fort Wolcott, being acquainted with Lieutt Ross of Pennsylvania who is stationed there. Major Toussard had the politeness to accompany me, and I was much pleased with the appearance of discipline & military decorum...
The daily Duties of my office require so much Writing that my hand and head are fatigued & exhausted before I have half done: and this must be my apology for not writing you till now. I hope you are now well settled in your Office and pursuing your studies. Practice will come in time, but the most certainly from an incessant Attendance upon the courts and taking minutes & making Reports of...
Your very kind favor of the 14th: instt: has a claim upon my gratitude, not only for the obliging wish it conveys, that I should become one of your family, on your return to Philadelphia, but also for the flattering opinion, you are pleased to express, on the Subject of my letters and classical taste. I shall make no scruple to accept the invitation to dwell under the same roof with my...
Your favor of the 12th: instant came to hand this morning, and I am greatly obliged by the kind invitation it contains to join you & my cousin at Trenton, which it would give me great pleasure to do immediately, but for the desire I feel of procuring an office in to which I may enter immediately on my return to the City. The inhabitants are daily flocking to town, but I have not thought it...
I received last night your favour of the 15th, the Sentiments and expressions of which are Such as are such as cannot fail to render your Character Prosperity and Happiness more dear to me than ever. An Office must be procured, and the Price or Rent must not be an Obstacle. I had rather pay for you a high Rent than you should not have an Office in Market or Chesnut Street. Your Brothers...
Since you are desirous of a Confidence in the Breast of your Father, and he is not less anxious to possess one in yours, I will open myself to you as soon as time will permit, upon Several Subjects and without assuming to dictate or controul will give you my candid, and frank advice. Although you have had a regular Education in the Theory and Practice of the Law, under a Master as eminent as...
I have received your favors of the 17th: and 19th: instants and take the first moment of leisure, that has occurred, since their receipt, to acknowledge gratefully these fresh instances of parental solicitude respecting my personal concerns. I shall reply without reserve to your last letter, which relates more immediately to my professional prospects. I have always been persuaded of the...
I have not received a letter from you since I left you. As I hear nothing of the epidemic in Philadelphia, I begin to hope that such a calamity will this year be spared to that city. I should be gratified to hear of your health and success. I could fill a sheet with curious anecdotes of politicks & electioneering, but as this is a subject on which I ought not to permit myself to write speak or...
Your kind favor of the 14th: has been some days in hand—I thank you for your tender solicitude for my health & success—As to the first I can say, with thankfulness that it is better than usual at this melting season—To the second, I can reply, that my professional success, is sufficient to keep me above despondency, though far short of my necessities. On Tuesday last I argued a cause of...
I thank you for your favour of July 26. I always rejoice to hear of your Arguing Causes. This Arguing is the way to business. Argue; Argue; Argue; forever when you can, and never be concerned about the issue, any further than you ought to interest yourself for truth and Justice. If you Speak in public, tho you loose your cause, it will Serve your reputation, if you Speak well, as much as if...
I received in course your favor of the 4th: instt: a pretty assiduous attendance at Court, during the whole of the last week prevented my making a sooner acknowledgment. Two causes of considerable moment were argued very elaborately, an outline of which may be found in the Gazette of the U.S. of the 16th— The question of war or no war, as it respects the relative situations of the United...
I received last night your favor of the 18th. I thank you for your account of the proceedings of the Supreme court.—I really believe you are right & that I was erroneous, in what we have said about the influence of politicks at the bar in Pensylvania. Indeed any where affected politicks do a man no good. I did not mean to prejudice you against your Quakers friends, who I doubt not are...