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    • Adams, John
    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Adams, John" AND Correspondent="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson"
Results 31-40 of 215 sorted by relevance
You tell me that the highest prize in the Lottery is only 5000 dollars therefore you have not purchased my Ticket as I wished to make an experiment of your luck I suppose you think 5000 dollars a paltry prize however I should like you to purchase me a ticket in any of the Lotteries in which you can procure one for $4 and 50 Cents, or 5 which I see advertised in all the Boston papers and beg it...
The day before yesterday our City was enlivened suddenly by the report of the ratification of the Spanish Treaty and every thing looked gay excepting my husband who gave no credit to the news when yesterday morning a cloud in the form of Capt Reid of the Hornet dispersed our sunshine and confirmed Mr. As doubts and destroying all the fond hopes of the too credulous citizens—Congress will of...
I will not apologize for not writing as I hate excuses none especially when they are bad or indifferent I hope your character is not changed for the worse and that whatever change may have taken place in you that your principles are still sound and fixed not withstanding I am aware that the theological controversies that are so fashionable in your part of the world are more calculated to...
& Miss Mason Capt & Mrs. Crane Mr. Kerby with several others Members of Congress—Mr. Petry came in the Eveng. and talked freely of the Bonaparté family He told me that while he was in Poland Napoleon was very much attached to a beautiful Polish Lady and that he (N.) rode fifteen miles every night during a fortnight at the risk of his life through the enemies Country to visit her—He likewise...
I am so concerned about Charles that I once more write to you on the subject and beg of you to let me know how he gets on and if you think there is any prospect of his being dismissed from College. His spirits appear to be so bad that I hope his fears are greater than there will be occasion for. But your utter silence concerning your brother is so extraordinary and when you consider his age so...
Your Letter distressed both your father and myself on account of the painful news it contained—but we were neither of us displeased with you as we were perfectly sensible of the motive both of duty and affection by which you were situated—We are still very uneasy at your Grandfathers situation altho I have had a letter from him since the receipt of yours which has induced us to hope that both...
Your Letter and the pleasing information it contains has greatly delighted your father and I think you will now be rewarded by his full approbation of the exertions which you have made and which at last have proved successful—We shall certainly visit Boston as I wrote you and George has engaged to study with Mr Webster who is now here—Miss Hopkinson is at Alexandria to which place I took her...
As I know how much your time must be engrossed by your studies my Dear John altho’ the temporary loss of your correspondence will grieve me I will submit to it most patiently on account of the motive which does you so much honour—I observe that you appear to be a little mortified in your last Letter at what I remarked in one of my former ones which you somewhat misunderstood—The observation I...
You have at last much to my satisfaction, renewed a correspondence which ought never to have been interrupted, and that in the most acceptable manner to your parents, by an assurance of future attention and regularity—The accounts we receive of your conduct are very flattering, and we receive them as an earnest of what we may hope and expect as you advance in life, to reward us for the many...
I am much pleased my Dear John by your Letters and hasten to answer the last which was received the day before yesterday—It was my intention to send you Miss Aikens Elizabeth but there is not a copy of it to be procured and I have not yet fixed upon any thing to supply its place—The books you mention have not fallen in my way and I have hitherto had no opportunity of perusing them but I agree...