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Feby 1. Continued very ill but having company at Dinner made an effort to struggle against my indisposition with a view to receive my expected guest’s—It was however and at four o’clock having gone through the labour of receiving many morning visitors I was under the necessity of retiring to my chamber—She was unusually gay and excellent and all the company sociable and merry—The party...
I thank you for your journals and pray you to continue them for they are a refreshing amusement to me in my desolation and solitude for such is my real condition through your three Sons visit me commonly once a week and cheer my drooping spirits and although my neighbours and friends are universally kind to me and solace my sorrows as much as they can and what is much more even my enemies seem...
Feby 11 Mr Bailey called this morning and informed us that Mr Pinckney was to speak at the Supreme Court and if we felt inclined he would accompany us—We accordingly accepted and went to Court which was just opened and Mr Pinckney rose—His oratory is formed in the modern theatrical school, and consists chiefly of whispered breathings almost inarticulate, and immediate transitions to burst’s of...
Feby 13—A very bad cold—The day very stormy which prevented my going out—Mr. Bailey passed the evening with us—The question on Genl. Jackson’s affairs appears to be given up in the Senate—The popular opinion is too favourable—and though the Gentleman from Georgia who is to take the lead, might have found it useful in procuring the attention of the Ministry in the Country which he is about to...
Feby. 18th The Evening brought my expected guests or rather a small part of them and on the whole the party appeared to enjoy themselves tolerably well—The night was fearfully cold and my company left me early on account of the complaints of the Coach men who refusd to wait for them—We are drawing near a conclusion and I certainly shall not regret it—Some Music and some dancing— 19 Went out...
Your journal ending 13th feb has given me a mixture of allarm and delight, allarm for your health and delight in your reflections. Mr. Jeffersons advice to translate the friendly epistle Don Onis and Mr. Irving into French and send them to Europe made me laugh outright—the expectation from Mr. Madison of a condemnation of his friend Monroe made me smile—but the threat to apply to me to condemn...
Your two last Letters would have been answered much sooner if they I had not been constantly engaged and prevented either by visitors at home or visiting abroad from writing or in fact doing anything—I think still you were mistaken about your having a Letter on my file which I had not attended to but you have assigned so excellent a reason for your silence which I ought to have recollected...
Feby. 27 Remained at home all the morning—Mr. Adams dined with Mr. Lowndes—In the evening went to the French Ministers where Mr. A accompanied me it being their last public night—God save the King produced a great effect I understand last night, and the papers are to ring with it tomorrow—The managers—Those of whom were Members of Congress had determined it should not be played, and Mrs. Peter...
Your journal up to the 20th. has as usual given me much pleasure and information; it shows very sufficiently that the great exertions which your situation demands of you, have exhausted your strength and rendered a relaxation absolutely necessary for you; I rejoice therefore that Congress have but three or four days to live; and when that body expires you will be at liberty; and when that body...
March 4th. Took a long walk the weather being beautiful—returned home to dress for dinner at having a company of 20 to Dine with us—Some of the Ladies who have declined visiting me the whole winter have thought proper to leave cards to take leave—I understand that many of them do not return as their husbands are not re–elected and after the adjournment of Congress they dropt their rank —Our...
8 March—Had a party of 48 or 50 in the evening which was less dull than I could possibly have flattered myself—Cards & music—Mr. A. dined with Genl Jackson who seems to think he is not fairly treated by the Executive—Engaged to accompany Mrs. Middleton to the theatre tomorrow evening— 9th. So unwell all day was obliged to stay at home and nurse—Reading Mr. Laws Book on Instinctive Impulses—It...
My Lecture was intended to warn you against imprudently expressing your feelings even in a good cause, and to guard you against misconstruction. I know your heart, and how utterly incapable you are of so selfish a feeling as that I mentioned in my last; but every body has not the same acquaintance with you, and are therefore liable to misjudge you—Your reason for making your visits less...
You reproach me unjustly my dear John and I suspect you received a long letter from me the 15 or 16 of the Month, in answer to your last; so that I am not so heavily indebted as you pretend It is very flattering to me, and affords me unspeakable pleasure, to find you so desirous of obtaining Letters from me, and it is so gratifying to me to seize every opportunity of evincing my affection for...
Your Letter of the 22 enclosing the lines you wrote arrived yesterday and both your father and myself were much pleased with them—The idea is very pretty, and the verse nearly correct, and the two last lines are very very good, the language being truly poetical, and the image is delicate and pathetic—I laboured some time to work on the idea, but could do nothing that pleased me half so well as...
Your three last journals are three Pearls—I have not been able to thank you for either—untill now, they bear the form and impression of the age—they let me into the Characters of Statesmen, Politicians, Orators, Pacts, Courtiers, Convivialists, dancers Dandy’s and above all, of Ladies of whom I should no Nothing, without your kind assistance—I am a little surprised at the depth of your...
your journals grow more and more entertaining and instructive—you ask my Opinion of General Jackson—and you shall have it—Hero and a Conqueror I cannot say that he has transgressed the Law of Nations in any one point—certainly neither Spain nor England has any right to complain; if he has transgressed any punctilios of the Constitution neither Spain nor England have anything to do with...
your Journal interesting to me like all the former, has been received up to the 29th of March.— The people of this Country when they are prejudiced against a Man, or a Name,—will not suffer him to take the least notice of any of his relations, however distant—tho their merits and service’s may have been ever so great—but when they are prejudiced in favour of a Man, or a Name they will applaud...
I have been so unwell the whole of this week my dear John, it has not been in my power to answer your Letter as soon as I wished—I observe all you say, and only answer that when you read Books worthy of remarks I will write you as fully as I do Charles who almost always gives me a subject—The Children of the Abbey, is a pretty thing, excessively romantic, but not calculated by any means to...
Two of your very kind Letters were brought me on Friday and Saturday and I should have written immediately but we have been under such perpetual alarms on account of fires that it has been difficult to sit down to any regular occupation—On Wednesday there were two frame houses and two Brick one destroyed on Thursday 2 Brick and 2 frame houses on Friday a Brick house at the Navy Yard 1 at the...
Yesterday brought me your Letter of the 7th which I was sorry announced a mishap which gave me some concern—I recommend you for the future on a rainy day to put your Seals in your pocket before you set out to school as a sure guard against such accidents— If your father will permit me I will lend you the American Revolution with pleasure as I am sure you will read it carefully and not injure...
It is always painful to be the bearer of bad tidings and yet it is a duty from which we cannot fly.—I have occasionally mentioned the dreadful state in which Lieut’ Clark has laid; that you might be prepared for that change, which was to release him from a world of suffering to a state of bliss—He terminated his life at eight o clock this morning after the most dreadful sufferings, but...
Yes! my Dear Sir, was my mind sufficiently strong, or capacious, to understand, or even to comprehend, the study of antient and modern philosophy I am certain I should derive very great advantage from that study—but you certainly forgot when you recommended it, that you were addressing one of the weaker Sex, to whom Stoicism would be both unamiable and unnatural, and who would be very liable...
By some means or other it would seem that one of my Letters to you have been lost—perhaps you had better enquire at the Post Office—I answered you immediately after you wrote about the desk and recommended you to take the one offered by Louisa Smith—I send you the dates of my Letters that you may ascertain whether any of them are missing 11th. 22d 29th March 18th and 23d April 24th. & 25th of...
I yesterday received your highly complimentary Letter which of course gratified my affection very much. I will not say my vanity for I am by no means certain that your praise is merited; on the contrary I am almost always dissatisfied with my own Letters, which are always dictated by the impulse of the moment; very useless, and little or no attention paid either to language or style—In writing...
Your last journal has so much Philosophy, and Religion, in it—that I am convinced you are a sincere inquirer after truth—God bless and Prosper you in the pursuit.— I am Informed by your Son—my dear Name Sake—that you propose to be here by the first of July—I pray you to be sure—that you arrive hear before that day.—bring your Husband with you—If the President can wander round the Universe and...
Your Letter contained news which grieved me sincerely and for which I much fear there is but little remedy; and the only consolation possibly to offer, is the most respectful and constantly affectionate attentions, towards your venerable Grandfather, whose every moment must be severely embittered by the unfortunate circumstance which you informed me of, and which we flattered ourselves was...
Your letter of the 16 was received yesterday & I hasten to answer it that you may not have reason to complain of my silence—I mark all you say and sincerely pray that no circumstance may ever occur in your course through life which may lead to habits which will either cause misery to yourself or disgrace to your parents and friends—There all persons in the world who are weak enough to imagine...
Human Life has been to me a State of trial from my Cradle to this seventh month of my Eaighty fourth year.— I believe enough of the Apocalypse to be perfectly convinced—“that “be thou faithful unto the death, and thou shalt receive a Crown of Life.”— Susan may depend upon it that her Mother, her Sister, her Brother in Law, her Female Associates in Quincy, and its neighbourhood, have been more...
I have received yours of the 3d.—I can only say if Susan will return to me with her Child and live in my complicated Family—she will be welcome to my heart—I will protect her at all hazards, as long as I live, and I will keep peace in my house, as long as I shall have the means, and the power—she must return to me, and there must not and shall not be family bickerings— Your Children have given...
With no less gratitude than astonishment I have received your Alcibiades,—and your Sons shall have it—but I am really concerned for your Health. How it is possible that a Gay Lady of Washington amidst all the ceremony’s, frivolity’s, and gravities, of a Court, and of a Legislature—Can find time to write so many and so excellent Letters to me; to her Children, and at the same time, translate...
Tomorrow is the great National anniversary and at the same the anniversary of your birth which event was to me as joyful as the other to the nation; and I always hail its return with pleasure and gratitude, Oh may this sentiment exist as long as you I have life, and may no unpropitious event cast a cloud over the brightness of this day which hitherto has been a day of joy. accept my...
I yesterday received your Letter announcing the death of Judge Tudor but the melancholy news which I had received from St Petersburg only half an hour before broke the shock as that comparatively was a calamity so dreadful that the death of the Judge appeared nothing more than an event which must naturally be expected—It is no doubt a distressing event to the family and sudden deaths are...
I have been so unwell with the Chicken pox since I returned from Virginia and the weather has been so hot, that I could not answer your last kind Letter so soon as I ought, to thank for the flattering kindness with which you received my ridiculous labours Believe me they it were not attended with fatigue, and did not at all interfere with my other avocations and are hardly worthy of the praise...
As I know how much your time must be engrossed by your studies my Dear John altho’ the temporary loss of your correspondence will grieve me I will submit to it most patiently on account of the motive which does you so much honour—I observe that you appear to be a little mortified in your last Letter at what I remarked in one of my former ones which you somewhat misunderstood—The observation I...
I am very uneasy my dear John at your indisposition more especially as you do not mention its nature—I hope the heaviest part of your labour is now terminated and that you will ere this Letter reaches you have acquitted yourself with honour and applause. I regret very much not being present at your exhibition still more that your father has been disappointed in consequence of the delay of the...
I think my last closed at our arrival at New London but I am not sure therefore you must excuse repetitions—We left the Hotel early in the morning to go on board the Steam Boat and I met many objects of attraction on my way to whom I should have been delighted to have paid my respects but my young master held my chain so fast that each attempt was frustrated and we arrived at the Wharf without...
You who know with what painful sensations I saw you depart for College, can readily imagine how much my sufferings were encreased, when this hour arrived, in which I was to bid adieu to the home which had so kindly cherished me, where I enjoyed a felicity much beyond my deserts, and which has excited in my heart a sense of gratitude difficult to express. My poor companion with whom Doctor,...
I can hardly believe my Eyes when I look upon your letter of the 13th. of October at Philadelphia, and recollect that it has not been acknowledged; and the comfortable intelligence of your safe arrival in that City, ought not to have been so long forgotten: Since that time, we have no intelligence from your family except a letter from Master Charles, to Master Thomas, by which I am happy to...
I should sooner have answered your Letter my Son had I not expected to hear that you had received Booth’s Journal the first Number of which was sent to you last Month its he is an object of great respect and attention to our little family here the neglect and coldness with which you appear to treat his literary production has been cause of offence to all and he has determined to retaliate by...
The day before yesterday our City was enlivened suddenly by the report of the ratification of the Spanish Treaty and every thing looked gay excepting my husband who gave no credit to the news when yesterday morning a cloud in the form of Capt Reid of the Hornet dispersed our sunshine and confirmed Mr. As doubts and destroying all the fond hopes of the too credulous citizens—Congress will of...
one week more will effectually relieve you from your ennui which perhaps may be succeeded by fatigues more difficult to bear—if not more dangerous to Health— Kings of England when they have wished to carry some great point with Parliament, have informed that Assembly that the Eyes of all Europe were upon them it—and it may be safely said that the eyes of all Europe, and of all America North...
One Week more will effectually relieve you from your ennui, which perhaps may be succeeded by fatigues more difficult to bear, if not more dangerous to Health— Kings of England when they have wished to carry some great point with Parliament, have informed that Assembly, that the Eyes of all Europe were upon it—And it may be safely said that the Eyes of all Europe, and of all America, North and...
Your Letter my dear John was brought me just before dinner and I hasten to answer it more particularly that part of it in which you mention that Messrs. Calvert and Taylor intend leaving Cambridge a week sooner then than the commencement of the Vacation and I am authorized by your father to tell you to present his compliments to Dr. Kirkland and request he will permit you to leave Cambridge at...
Journal 6. December 1819 Our City being reanimated by the return of Congress I shall attempt to renew our correspondence in the old journal form in the hope of enabling you to in some measure to participate in our pleasures and troubles which we must expect to have intimately blended—Your Letter is I fear too justly prophetic and your ideas on the present aspect of affairs accord but too well...
December 11th. Went into Georgetown to see Mrs Otis, was not admitted Called on Mrs Smith and Mrs Frye both very well returned home to dinner Dr Forsythe from South America called in the evening, He too was soliciting a place to which a deaf ear was turned. 12th—Not well and could not go to church; the day cold and disagreeable Mary much better. Evening alone. 13th—Went out and paid visits and...
December 22nd 1819.—Went to visit a neighbour and walked as far as Mrs. Smiths. This evening a small sociable party at Mrs Forsyths where I heard some good music by Mr. and Mrs Meigs the former of whom has a remarkably fine voice Mr and Mrs Lowndes were there. She has visited me in the most friendly manner all the summer during the absence of her husband but has now dropped my acquaintance on...
As I take a great interest in your pleasures, and your troubles, your last Journal has given me a large share of both—the social scenes are delightful and the prospect of trouble is afflicting—I am interested too in the Journey of our Collegians who came here on Thursday—sett all the Tailors with their Needles in Motion—and on Saturday went to Boston with their Uncle who fitted them off with...
Compliments of the Season, and what is better prayers that you may enjoy the present year and as many future years as you can endure in health Peace and Competence—I congratulate you, on your having your Olive plants round about you—though the two Collegians have not been dutiful enough to send me a journal of their journey—nor an account of their arrival at their Paternal Mansion—a Residence...
4th. Jany The weather still severely cold—My Sons are gone to the House of Representatives to hear the Debates—Your Letter has just been put into my hands and I observe all yo u say upon the subject of Missouri. She has unfortunately a very intemperate Delegate who is not calculated to soften the impending storm. Much alarm evidently exists as to the consequences of this Question and Congress...
Your journal to the 21st. ult—has given me much amusement and much pleasure I want to touch upon twenty things but that number is too great. The Missouri question is the most magnificent and portentous. I have no doubt of the right of Congress to stop the progress of Slavery, and if I were disposed to give you my reasons I Should think it unnecessary since I have read a review of Judge Story &...