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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Adams, John" AND Correspondent="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson"
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Ere you can have arrived at Baltimore my beloved Children I address you in the hope that my Letter may find you immediately after your arrival at Boston in good spirits and safety and to thank you both for the many happy hours which you have caused your Mother to enjoy by your good conduct and affectionate attentions during your visit. Life is a scene so mixed so full of pleasure and pain that...
7 Feby. We remained at home all the Evening Morning—Mr Adams dined at the Capitol with Mr Mrs L Hill and walked part of the way home which encreased his Cold and was quite unwell when he got to Mrs. Brown’s where we all went to a Ball which was very splendid and elegant—I had a great deal of conversation with many person’s and one with Mr Archer of Virginia upon second marriages which was...
I have received your last Journal, and thank you for it. When the Lady asked you which you prefered, the Illiad, or Paradise lost, you should have answered her as we New-England people do, by asking her another question, pray Madam do you read the Illiad in Greek, or in Pope. I wonder not that you threw your arms round your husband upon reading his answer to General Smyth, I would have done...
30th: January—Mr A & the boys dined at Mrs Decaturs & met us at Mr Cannings They found Mrs Decatur was very affable & agreeable & they were much delighted with their entertainment—The balls at this house are always elegant but there is still something flatt & stiff resulting from the knowledge of the Masters rigid love of ettiquette & ceremony—Beauty always appears to advantage here— 31st:...
22d The day was very unpleasant and I remained at home until the Evening when we went to the Drawing Room notwithstanding that it poured with rain. To our great surprize however we found a number of Ladies and Gentlemen and quite a sociable Party. We remained there about an hour and were rejoiced to get safe home. The young men went to the Circus to see the wonderful Rider who has just...
1st January. If the weather to day is ominous of the storms of the ensuing year we must not expect much quiet—Let it come—I will not flinch be the end what it may—We went to the Presidents where we found a much larger party assembled than would have been expected considering the difficulties attendant on a sortie in such an inclement day—The Corps diplomatique paid their usual compliment and...
Wonderful Woman, wife of a wonderful Man, How it is possible for you with your delicate Constitution and tender Health, to go through such a hurry of Visits, Dinners, and parties, Converse with such a variety, of Characters, masculine, and Feminine, and at the same time keep so particular a Journal. Yours of the 14th of December, up to the 30th. has arrived this Morning. your journal is a kind...
I have received your last Journal and found it entertaining though you seem to think so little of it; I have infinitely less to write to you, Though you seem to think your journal infinitely little, nevertheless as our friend Shaw is with me, and willing to write for me, I will gossip with you a little.— The Newspapers of this part of the World are blazing with republications of Mr. Adams’s...
Your Journal beginning the third of the month has given me great pleasure. You are much to be envied and much to be pitied; such a variety of good Company is very desirable, but so much cerimoney and such fatigues must be rather burdensome.— We have received this morning the annunciation of Mr. Clays “GREAT UNKNOWN VOLUME OF GHENTISH HISTORY ” It will appear I presume at least as soon as the...
With high spirits I received the hand writing and the journal of the 1st. of this Month. I opened gay hopes before me for the Winter I rejoice in the recovery of you health, and to hear of the good health of you all— Mr. Adams, his Lady and Son appear to enjoy a serene and patient tranquility under the pelting of this pitiless Storm of political hail the thunder is not loud, and the Lightning...
& Miss Mason Capt & Mrs. Crane Mr. Kerby with several others Members of Congress—Mr. Petry came in the Eveng. and talked freely of the Bonaparté family He told me that while he was in Poland Napoleon was very much attached to a beautiful Polish Lady and that he (N.) rode fifteen miles every night during a fortnight at the risk of his life through the enemies Country to visit her—He likewise...
14th December. We were all so exhausted that we determined to keep quiet all day at home. Received a Note from a Milliner requesting I would go and look at his things, this is a thing which has happened several times—Am I so much in vogue? I am solicited to take great care of myself this Winter and not to get sick, Are People afraid of closed doors again? What a hollow hearted World How much I...
12. December Mrs Frye called today to see me and I went with her to the Kings Picture Gallery and appointed Monday for her to sit to him—Her husband has one of the vilest things I ever saw which was taken by some miserable dauber —it is not fit to adorn a sign post—Had 21 visits and went out to see Mrs Calhoun Mrs Findlay, & Mrs Ingham—The former is a respectable looking elderly Lady the...
Decbr. 3 A Snow Storm—No visitors—In the evening a small party in consequence of the extreme severity of the weather—It was however tolerably pleasant—Dr. & Mrs. Thornton Mrs Key Mr & Miss Tayloe, Mr Mrs. & Miss Pleasanton, Major and Miss Selden, Dr Wrightman, Miss Hanson, Miss Aldrich Miss Forrest, Judge McLean, Mr Cook of Illinois Mr. Rhea, Mr Lear Mr. Coxe Mr. Elgar and Dr. Huntt with the...
1 December 1822 This day being in tolerable health I renew my journal with the intention to pursue it through the Winter This Winter in consequence of the intriguing for the Presidency will be such an one as will furnish sufficient incident to make it interesting—As however I collect most of the news from mere publick rumour I do not vouch for the truth of it and it will of course be subject...
I have been so much engaged the last week at races parties and Ball it has been impossible for me to answer your last Letter or to write to Charles Eclipse as you have heard ran down poor Sir Charles who was totally unfitted by his lameness to oppose the pride of the North and I confess the race as it appears to me was altogether so unequal I cannot see any thing to boast of on the winning...
It is sometime since I have written you in consequence of indisposition I have therefore two of your Letters unanswered— It was scarcely possible for so great a belle as Miss A Quincy to take particular notice of a certain young gentleman without my hearing of it—publick rumour has many tongues and though you may not yet be a subject of sufficient importance to excite attention the young Lady...
Your last is written under such disagreeable circumstances it partook a good deal of your general discomfort in its tone and expression. I have therefore delayed my answer until your difficulties shall be smoothed and your usual equanimity returned when I know my Letter will be welcome and you will not misconstrue the affectionate anxiety of Parents who have perhaps an exaggerated idea of the...
I sent you from Philadelphia an odd volume of A Sketch of Old England which I wrote your name in and addressed to Quincy—The second was stolen from me but as their some good matter in the first and as it is a book in which there is no history to break it would be worth reading though it cannot rank as a perfect work in your collection—I shall soon send you the favorite of Nature which is said...
Do not suffer your failure to mortify you too much my dear John—It was accidental and must not prevent your future efforts—Fortune will at length smile propitious and reward your amiable exertions—I feel most sensibly for the pain you must have suffered and only wish I had been present to alleviate it—Your Father will perhaps be a little disappointed but your desire to excel will meet with its...
I am much pleased my Dear John by your Letters and hasten to answer the last which was received the day before yesterday—It was my intention to send you Miss Aikens Elizabeth but there is not a copy of it to be procured and I have not yet fixed upon any thing to supply its place—The books you mention have not fallen in my way and I have hitherto had no opportunity of perusing them but I agree...
Oh! that I could visit Philadelphia! and run about as I did Forty Eight years ago—to Roman Catholic Churches, Quaker meetings Anabaptist Churches, Methodistical Churches, Swedenborgian Churches—and Presbyterian Churches Not one Congregational Church could I find. Nor of a Unitarian Church was the possibility conceived by any one in that City. Tell Mrs Powell however, that I would now visit her...
Your Letter of the 29 reached me safely the day before yesterday and as it contained information concerning your Grandfathers plans I enclosed it to your father to whom it will probably be very interesting— Your regular and constant attention to your College duties gives me the utmost pleasure and though it may not be crowned with as much success there as you hope or have a right to expect...
It is very long since I had the pleasure of writing to you. considering George a better correspondent I resigned the pen to him but being here and out of the way of hearing from you so often as I used I am induced to write and recal to your recollection some of your old friends who make frequent enquiries concerning you— Among them and perhaps the first in rank is Mrs. Powell whose age and...
My Brother much as usual. The impossibility of hastening the cure of his very painful desease in consequence of this heat affects his spirits very much and makes him fretful and gloomy; ever anticipating evil, and unwilling to enjoy present good—Poor fellow—it is surely very hard to know he would be relieved in a few days, and at the same time to suffer ly the pain, but the idea which the mind...
I yesterday received your Letter which was forwarded to me by George from Washington—Your Uncle is under the hand of Dr. Physick and it is impossible for us to know whether we can get on to Boston or not rely on it that my desire to see you would induce me to make some great effort but I shall insist on seeing you in the Winter and after that you may perhaps have an opportunity of seeing us...
read my Letter attentively and then tell me if you perceive any thing like harshness abou ? in it. Deep anxiety on account of your brother whose representation of his terror as to his prospects had very much affected me and a fear that you might think yourselves harshly treated made me express myself perhaps in stronger terms terms than I was aware of but could you have read my heart while I...
I have been much gratified at hearing of your success at the Exhibition which news has reached us in a variety of ways—It has however been suggested that your success would have been still more complete if you had spoken a little louder but this is a defect which I hope you will outgrow as your voice strengthens and by acquiring a habit of speaking in publick— I wish you would tell Mr Boylston...
I am so concerned about Charles that I once more write to you on the subject and beg of you to let me know how he gets on and if you think there is any prospect of his being dismissed from College. His spirits appear to be so bad that I hope his fears are greater than there will be occasion for. But your utter silence concerning your brother is so extraordinary and when you consider his age so...
I will not apologize for not writing as I hate excuses none especially when they are bad or indifferent I hope your character is not changed for the worse and that whatever change may have taken place in you that your principles are still sound and fixed not withstanding I am aware that the theological controversies that are so fashionable in your part of the world are more calculated to...
I yesterday received your Letter and was very much concerned to observe the depression of spirits under which you laboured, but the rapid approach of Spring will I hope restore you to all those blithsome feelings which are so charming and so natural to your nature character and disposition—. It is too true alas that in the attainment of the knowledge of human nature we are obliged to wade...
Being very well I hasten to write you and although you disclaim all merit in a certain transaction still to repeat my approbation of a conduct which does you so much honour and which I hope (although you must not expect) will be rewarded by the improvement and merit of its object—Should this not happen do not suffer the disappointment to mortify or wound your feelings or to damp any future...
Being much better in health I seize the opportunity of writing a few lines to you and your brother— There are some actions my Son that are altogether above praise and that can only be rewarded by the consciousness of having done well and deserved the approbation of the virtuous and the good—rest assured that such actions sink deep into your Mothers heart and that she prays fervently to her...
Altho’ I write with difficulty I cannot resist the temptation and must gratify myself by writing to you and my Dear Charles even if I pay dear for it—Upon one subject the nearest to my heart I will say nothing lest I should say too much—In this world we must innure ourselves to disappointments and we must learn to meet them with patience and only remember them as incitements to greater...
I should have answer’d your Letter earlier could I write with my accustomed care but it fatigues me so much I feel too much inclined to neglect my usually pleasant occupations— I received a Letter yesterday from your brother which indicates a very seriously discontented mind and makes me very apprehensive that his disposition is acquiring a habit of complaining and uneasiness calculated to...
I have to thank you for two amiable letters—the last is of too great importance for me to answer, to your satisfaction, or my own—I am myself too much under the influence of prejudices to have ever, have, reproached you seriously with yours. —As long as association of ideas and feelings and the consequent power of habit shall be a constituent part of the constitution of human nature; so long...
I have to thank you for two amiable letters—the last is of too great importance for me to answer to your satisfaction or my own. I am myself too much under the influence of prejudices to have ever reproached you seriously with yours. As long as association of ideas & feelings and the consequent power of habit shall be a constituent part of the constitution of human nature so long will all men...
I make no charges against you what ever and on the contrary am delighted to find that if I did you can so easily exonerate yourself from them—What I meant in my last Letter was simply to put you on your guard and to inform you that such a plea was made to your father as a reason for your not having risen higher in your Class— Georges pen is so prolific and his style so pleasant I believe I...
When at Quincy you have often reproached me for being prejudiced concerning the Unitarians and not willing to listen to listen to the truth—I now candidly confess that I understand so little what the difference is between this and other sects I should feel very thankful if you would enlighten my underst and ing upon these points at the same time requesting you not to refer me to long...
Since my return home George has so well supplied my place in writing to you and we have had so few events (save melancholy ones) to detail that I find it scarce possible to address you on any subject that can excite a moments interest—The family generally are well and Georges health we hope is rappidly mending— This day the new Spanish Minister was introduced to the President this day . He is...
In answer to your Letter of 17 which I received last evening I have only to beg that you will keep up your spirits and make every exertion to remove the impressions which your father received during his visit to Cambridge and which he is too just to retain if you convince him by your application and industry that those impressions are incorrect—Your frequent and injudicious declarations that...
The plan of your father to follow us as far as the cross roads to Dedham prevented my taking leave of you I therefore hasten to write you a few lines in explanation and to let you know how we go on—Our journey was tolerably pleasant until we reached Blakes at West Greenwich where the Coachman was taken sick and we were obliged to hurry on to New London as I was impatient to consult a...
Your father yesterday performed his part to admiration and there was as much general satisfaction expressed as could possibly be expected in a place where so many great interests and powerful passions are ever at work—He looked better than I ever saw him and was less fatigued than could have been expected or hoped It was the anniversary of your eighteenth birth day and the mingled feelings of...
My visit is delayed In consequence of the celebration of the 4th July a day of double interest to me, as the anniversary of our Independence, and of the birth of our dear John—You will have seen by the papers that your Son is to perform a conspicuous part on this occasion, for which he is all ready and thoroughly prepared—The President is here and has been invited to dine with the company, but...
Your Letter pleased and displeased me; the goodness and purity of your motives can never admit of a doubt, but there are ways of doing things which sometimes make them appear harsh and unkind and the general style of your last impressed your father with the idea that you were not so affectionate and kind to your Brother as he could wish for your mutual comfort—Your brothers excentricities of...
Your Letter reached me last Eveng. and I am very sorry to learn that your Grandfather is so feeble as it is a symtom which I am apprehensive which indicates a decay of constitution which may lead us to dread a close of his career much earlier than we any of us anticipate—Mrs. Clark’s accounts from Quincy differ very much according to her and Mrs. French and I think she would be wiser if she...
I am glad to learn from your favour of 25. of May, that you have Seen Mr and Miss Roach. They had Eyes and Ears to perceive the eternal person; but not feelings to Sympathize with the internal Griefs Paines Anxieties Solicitudes and inquietudes within. I will not however complain. No Man had ever more cause of Gratitude. In all the Vicisstudes terrors, Vexations and Perplexities and Agitations...
Your Letter pleased both your father and myself as your reasoning is very good and shows reflection and forethought I beg as a favour that you will take pains to intimate as delicately as you can that I have no thought of bringing either of the Girls home with me as your father will not hear of it on the very ground which you have represented—The perpetual round of company in which I live in...
Mr Roach with his Sister and daughter are to dine with us to day he tells me that he had the pleasure of seeing you and that you were in perfect health Our City is full of strangers and we have been as dissipated during the last week as we generally are in the Winter The weather is more variable and altogether worse than I ever remember it and we can scarcely be said to have left off fires...
Last night I received and read your lovely Letter of the 11th: As the three Cantabridgeans were here—they and I and all the family Uncle Aunt and Cousins all enjoyed the Luxury of it at Supper. It made a great impression on all of Us, especially upon George who with great dignity enjoined it upon his Brothers to lay the contents of it to heart. We all rejoice in the hope of seeing you in July...