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    • Adams, John
    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Adams, John" AND Correspondent="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson"
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It is a very long time my dear venerated father since I have written to you; but the events of yesterday were altogether so interesting I cannot refrain from giving you an account of them— The genl in his travels through this Country has been so much the publick idol, and the devotion of the people has been continued with so much fervour until the last moment of his residence among us, he...
Your journal which has become a necessary of life to me has failed me for a long time, but I must excuse it because it is too severe a tax upon you, and I hope and presume that George is too deeply absorbed in the studies of his profession to be able to spare time to copy your records. We are here in a news-paper flurry of flickenings for Governour and they will associate your Husband with Mr....
I write you a few lines my dear John in answer to yours which I received last night merely to say we are all well and your Grandfather better but we are so immerced in dinners and partys that my head is perfectly turned— Give my love to Johnson (Hellen), and tell him not to grieve—for I am glad the connection has failed as there is something in the conduct of all parties not altogether...
I have not been able my Dear John to keep the promise I made to you at parting of writing in consequence of having omitted to bring my writing materials which you know must involve me in some difficulty as you have frequently experienced the embarrassment attending the acquirement of the means to carry on a correspondence in this house—We found your Grandfather so much altered that we were...
I was so much occupied during my stop at Borden Town I could not answer your Letter therefore busy myself here having nothing to do with all the nonsense I can think of for pastime. You can easily conceive, the dreariness of my situation travelling alone with your father who though more of a than I can recollect since the earliest period of our marriage is still too much of a Statesman to be...
I write to announce our safe arrival at this place from whence we propose to start on a visit of two days to Mrs. De Wint this afternoon to return on Friday night to meet your father and proceed in the Steam Boat on Saturday afternoon to Providence where I presume we shall remain until Monday Morning—As the Horses are very tired it is probable we shall take a Stage to Quincy and see you all on...
In answer to your last my Dear John I can only say that if the accomodations are so suitable and the price so reasonable as you say at the Exchange I should most certainly prefer them to any others but you know that your father is particular on this point and I wish you to ascertain exactly before I come so that we may decide immediately after our arrival—There will be your father myself Ellen...
Your Letter my dear John gave us great uneasiness on your Grandfathers account and we feel very anxious lest the violence of the shock should have injured his health. We hope to hear from you frequently and that your Letters may be welcomed as harbingers of good instead of ill news for the future— I propose to leave this City on the 14 as your father wishes me to travel in the Carriage I shall...
I cannot imagine my Dear John what can be the reason of your not writing to me. You used to be a very regular correspondent, but I suppose the Ladies have such demands on your time you have none to bestow on your poor Mother. We are very happy to learn from Mr Pomeroy, that your Grandfather is so entirely recovered he tells us the old Gentleman has not looked so well this two years as he does...
I am, as well as your father, much delighted at the account you give of your Grandfathers health, and heartily pray that he may long enjoy the pleasure his little Carriage at present affords him—Charles writes me that he is quite sick, and that he would probably visit Quincy in consequence of it. I wish he may, as he does not understand managing himself, and should be under the care of those...