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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Correspondent="Adams, John" AND Correspondent="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson"
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As I know how much your time must be engrossed by your studies my Dear John altho’ the temporary loss of your correspondence will grieve me I will submit to it most patiently on account of the motive which does you so much honour—I observe that you appear to be a little mortified in your last Letter at what I remarked in one of my former ones which you somewhat misunderstood—The observation I...
You have at last much to my satisfaction, renewed a correspondence which ought never to have been interrupted, and that in the most acceptable manner to your parents, by an assurance of future attention and regularity—The accounts we receive of your conduct are very flattering, and we receive them as an earnest of what we may hope and expect as you advance in life, to reward us for the many...
I am much pleased my Dear John by your Letters and hasten to answer the last which was received the day before yesterday—It was my intention to send you Miss Aikens Elizabeth but there is not a copy of it to be procured and I have not yet fixed upon any thing to supply its place—The books you mention have not fallen in my way and I have hitherto had no opportunity of perusing them but I agree...
Altho’ I write with difficulty I cannot resist the temptation and must gratify myself by writing to you and my Dear Charles even if I pay dear for it—Upon one subject the nearest to my heart I will say nothing lest I should say too much—In this world we must innure ourselves to disappointments and we must learn to meet them with patience and only remember them as incitements to greater...
Your last Letter my Dear John was indeed filled with grievous news and I sincerely pity the afflicted family who are left in a situation so melancholy—The shock must no doubt have been severe to your Grandfather although it was expected; but the strongest minds insensibly repel the idea of death until the inevitable doom is sealed, and we cannot fly from conviction by its sad and solemn...
Your sudden silence after the affectionate and unremitted attention you shewed during your dear Grandmothers illness and the total want of information since on the subject of the family in general has occasioned both your father and myself much uneasiness and we are counting the mails every day to meet fresh disappointment Your Fathers Messenger has just been and I flew down in the hope of...
I was seriously concerned to hear of your illness and am still considerably uneasy of lest you should by any imprudence have a relapse and I entreat you will be particularly careful of the Night air—You must write me frequently even if it is only to say “I am well ” as I shall be very anxious for some time I presume you are taking the Bark? what Phyissian attended you? was your complaint...
I am very uneasy my dear John at your indisposition more especially as you do not mention its nature—I hope the heaviest part of your labour is now terminated and that you will ere this Letter reaches you have acquitted yourself with honour and applause. I regret very much not being present at your exhibition still more that your father has been disappointed in consequence of the delay of the...
Your Letter my dear John was brought me just before dinner and I hasten to answer it more particularly that part of it in which you mention that Messrs. Calvert and Taylor intend leaving Cambridge a week sooner then than the commencement of the Vacation and I am authorized by your father to tell you to present his compliments to Dr. Kirkland and request he will permit you to leave Cambridge at...
Yesterday brought me your Letter my Dear John and your father and myself were both pleased to see the account you give of our dear fathers health for whom we have been very anxious for some time—According to your account I am a little afraid you will get spoilt among so many belles who will so inflate your natural vanity that you will be likely to share the fate of Narcissus—Some of these...
Your last is written under such disagreeable circumstances it partook a good deal of your general discomfort in its tone and expression. I have therefore delayed my answer until your difficulties shall be smoothed and your usual equanimity returned when I know my Letter will be welcome and you will not misconstrue the affectionate anxiety of Parents who have perhaps an exaggerated idea of the...
It is so long since I have written I feel that it is difficult to offer an apology for my silence or rather such an one as would prove satisfactory: it however proceeded from the extreme dullness of the City and the excessive heat of the Summer in the first place; a journey to visit my relations in Frederick in the second; and a severe indisposition in the third which confined me to my bed...
An indisposition which confined me to my bed in the first instance and moving in the next into our house in F Street has prevented my answering your Letter earlier and my papers are all in such confusion that I cannot pretend to find it now so as to answer it correctly— Our House will hardly be well fixed before you come on and at present Charles is obliged to sleep in the Drawing room which...
Do not suffer your failure to mortify you too much my dear John—It was accidental and must not prevent your future efforts—Fortune will at length smile propitious and reward your amiable exertions—I feel most sensibly for the pain you must have suffered and only wish I had been present to alleviate it—Your Father will perhaps be a little disappointed but your desire to excel will meet with its...
I am afraid that Charles has been writing some nonsense concerning Harriet Welsh which has caused you to write so disrespectfully concerning her Charl’s got hold of my papers and contrary to my most positive orders read them and then wrote you something or other not much to his credit—I therefore beg I may hear no more on this subject I am certainly very sorry to hear that you were so...
Your Letter of the 29 reached me safely the day before yesterday and as it contained information concerning your Grandfathers plans I enclosed it to your father to whom it will probably be very interesting— Your regular and constant attention to your College duties gives me the utmost pleasure and though it may not be crowned with as much success there as you hope or have a right to expect...
I am, as well as your father, much delighted at the account you give of your Grandfathers health, and heartily pray that he may long enjoy the pleasure his little Carriage at present affords him—Charles writes me that he is quite sick, and that he would probably visit Quincy in consequence of it. I wish he may, as he does not understand managing himself, and should be under the care of those...
I have just received your Letter and am very much pleased to find you all in such good spirits Why George should have roared so at the idea of your fathers dancing I do not know—but he is not the only one so affected for Mr. Walker of the Senate I thought would have fallen on the floor—Washington is becoming quite dull notwithstanding our wedding we are however to have dancing on Tuesday and...
The plan of your father to follow us as far as the cross roads to Dedham prevented my taking leave of you I therefore hasten to write you a few lines in explanation and to let you know how we go on—Our journey was tolerably pleasant until we reached Blakes at West Greenwich where the Coachman was taken sick and we were obliged to hurry on to New London as I was impatient to consult a...
Your Letter pleased and displeased me; the goodness and purity of your motives can never admit of a doubt, but there are ways of doing things which sometimes make them appear harsh and unkind and the general style of your last impressed your father with the idea that you were not so affectionate and kind to your Brother as he could wish for your mutual comfort—Your brothers excentricities of...
read my Letter attentively and then tell me if you perceive any thing like harshness abou ? in it. Deep anxiety on account of your brother whose representation of his terror as to his prospects had very much affected me and a fear that you might think yourselves harshly treated made me express myself perhaps in stronger terms terms than I was aware of but could you have read my heart while I...
Having observed in the papers that the reason assigned for your declining to accept the invitation on the 4h. was on account of indisposition Mr. Adams and myself are anxious to hear from you and to be assured that it was rather the dread of over fatigue than real indisposition which caused your refusal to attend. It would have been altogether improper to make such an exertion and I rejoice...
I last evening received your Letter of the 20h with great delight and assure you I require nothing but your word to satisfy me regarding your conduct having always had full reliance on your respect to truth—When I wrote I had heard a terrible account of the rebellion and was excessively alarmed at the consequences for you under this impression and trembling with lest George in his desire to...
My visit is delayed In consequence of the celebration of the 4th July a day of double interest to me, as the anniversary of our Independence, and of the birth of our dear John—You will have seen by the papers that your Son is to perform a conspicuous part on this occasion, for which he is all ready and thoroughly prepared—The President is here and has been invited to dine with the company, but...
Your Letter of the 22 enclosing the lines you wrote arrived yesterday and both your father and myself were much pleased with them—The idea is very pretty, and the verse nearly correct, and the two last lines are very very good, the language being truly poetical, and the image is delicate and pathetic—I laboured some time to work on the idea, but could do nothing that pleased me half so well as...
I have been very unwell and likewise waiting for some answer from your father concerning the books you asked and I have the pleasure to tell you that your father agrees to your demand and will give you the british Theatre— You have apparently forgotten all the Commissions with which you were charged as I have neither heard nor seen any thing of Charles’s Books or the Shells which you promised...
I have been very sick confined to my bed for several days therefore not able to write to either of you as I have intended as I have this day left my bed I send you at least a few lines in answer to both your Letters received within two days and to express if possible the gratification which the proper and affectionate feelings they manifested to your brother occasioned both to your father and...
It is sometime since I have written you in consequence of indisposition I have therefore two of your Letters unanswered— It was scarcely possible for so great a belle as Miss A Quincy to take particular notice of a certain young gentleman without my hearing of it—publick rumour has many tongues and though you may not yet be a subject of sufficient importance to excite attention the young Lady...
Two of your very kind Letters were brought me on Friday and Saturday and I should have written immediately but we have been under such perpetual alarms on account of fires that it has been difficult to sit down to any regular occupation—On Wednesday there were two frame houses and two Brick one destroyed on Thursday 2 Brick and 2 frame houses on Friday a Brick house at the Navy Yard 1 at the...
In answer to your Letter of 17 which I received last evening I have only to beg that you will keep up your spirits and make every exertion to remove the impressions which your father received during his visit to Cambridge and which he is too just to retain if you convince him by your application and industry that those impressions are incorrect—Your frequent and injudicious declarations that...
Since my return home George has so well supplied my place in writing to you and we have had so few events (save melancholy ones) to detail that I find it scarce possible to address you on any subject that can excite a moments interest—The family generally are well and Georges health we hope is rappidly mending— This day the new Spanish Minister was introduced to the President this day . He is...
Ere you can have arrived at Baltimore my beloved Children I address you in the hope that my Letter may find you immediately after your arrival at Boston in good spirits and safety and to thank you both for the many happy hours which you have caused your Mother to enjoy by your good conduct and affectionate attentions during your visit. Life is a scene so mixed so full of pleasure and pain that...
Your reproach my dear Sir was very keen and keenly felt because conscience pointed its force and added mortification to its merited sting—To make excuses will not repair the fault and the only rational one I can offer is that I have been waiting impatiently for the publication of the weights and measures and was really entirely decieved as to the length of time that had elapsed since writing...
In answer to your last my Dear John I can only say that if the accomodations are so suitable and the price so reasonable as you say at the Exchange I should most certainly prefer them to any others but you know that your father is particular on this point and I wish you to ascertain exactly before I come so that we may decide immediately after our arrival—There will be your father myself Ellen...
I was very much pleased with the writing of your Letter and only have to recommend to you now to pay some attention to your style, which is essential to a gentleman; as he must necessarily through life enter into correspondence either on business or familiar subjects in which a correct and elegant style is expected and more particularly from persons possessing great advantages of education—I...
From Letters received from Edward Taylor and Charles, I at length understand that the unpleasant occurrence which has taken place at Cambridge has again proved one of those in which the Esprit de Corps has made it necessary for you to take your part and to act with your Class—I grieve most sincerely at this necessity which ultimately must be very injurious to you and probably lose you your...
I have been so much indisposed it has been almost impossible for me to keep my journal and my family has been too large to admit of sufficient quiet to do any thing but partake of the amusements of the place which however have been but few comparatively speaking. It has been remarked frequently that there has never been so gloomy a session as the present and I doubt if there ever was one which...
Since I received your last Letter we have been kept in a state of great anxiety who was on account of poor Mrs. Caldwell the only Sister of your Uncle Boyd who was suddenly siezed with strong convulsions without any previous suffering or apparent cause; which fell upon her brain and after eight days of great distress to her friends she expired—Leaving a husband who adored her and sir Children...
When at Quincy you have often reproached me for being prejudiced concerning the Unitarians and not willing to listen to listen to the truth—I now candidly confess that I understand so little what the difference is between this and other sects I should feel very thankful if you would enlighten my underst and ing upon these points at the same time requesting you not to refer me to long...
I make no charges against you what ever and on the contrary am delighted to find that if I did you can so easily exonerate yourself from them—What I meant in my last Letter was simply to put you on your guard and to inform you that such a plea was made to your father as a reason for your not having risen higher in your Class— Georges pen is so prolific and his style so pleasant I believe I...
What shall I say to you my Dear John? or how shall I refrain from reproaching you? I will not judge you because I cannot yet understand what the difficulty is which occasioned your fault for a fault it is and a grave one however you or your Class may colour it—You were fully aware of how much you would lose and perfectly understood how much your father always is affected by this sort of...
Your Letters my Dear John gave us great uneasiness on account of your Grandfathers health and for your own situation which is painful to an extreme—But it is vain to repine at that which cannot be changed or to suffer evil to absorb all our attention—The only remedy that is now to be offered is an unwearied application to acquire reputation and renown in your profession and by this means wash...
The state of cruel anxiety in which we remain on account of your Grandmamma’s illness has occasioned my not writing to you as punctually as I otherwise should have done and I now do not feel in spirits to say more than that both your father and myself are greatly pleased at your affectionate attention in writing so frequently. I thank you for your translations which your father says are better...
I yesterday received your Letter which was forwarded to me by George from Washington—Your Uncle is under the hand of Dr. Physick and it is impossible for us to know whether we can get on to Boston or not rely on it that my desire to see you would induce me to make some great effort but I shall insist on seeing you in the Winter and after that you may perhaps have an opportunity of seeing us...
Being much better in health I seize the opportunity of writing a few lines to you and your brother— There are some actions my Son that are altogether above praise and that can only be rewarded by the consciousness of having done well and deserved the approbation of the virtuous and the good—rest assured that such actions sink deep into your Mothers heart and that she prays fervently to her...
Mr Roach with his Sister and daughter are to dine with us to day he tells me that he had the pleasure of seeing you and that you were in perfect health Our City is full of strangers and we have been as dissipated during the last week as we generally are in the Winter The weather is more variable and altogether worse than I ever remember it and we can scarcely be said to have left off fires...
I have been so unwell with the Chicken pox since I returned from Virginia and the weather has been so hot, that I could not answer your last kind Letter so soon as I ought, to thank for the flattering kindness with which you received my ridiculous labours Believe me they it were not attended with fatigue, and did not at all interfere with my other avocations and are hardly worthy of the praise...
I yesterday received your Letter of the 15 instt. and really can scarcely find an excuse for my long silence both to you and to Charles whose Letters afford me so much real pleasure—The Legacy of the picture must be very delightful to you, both as a proof of your Grandmothers kind and affectionate remembrance, and as a very good likeness of a father whose extreme tenderness and indulgence to...
Worn out by fatigue parties influenza and all sorts of weariness both of mind and body I have really been too idle to attend to my correspondence and have scarcely taken a pen in my hand—The apology is a poor one but such as it is you must be content to accept it for it is the truth— The City has been profoundly dull since the adjournment of Congress and we have had but one event to enliven us...
This Letter will reach you I hope on Saturday evening and present you the sincere congratulations of your Mother who is truly happy to have given birth to a Son hitherto so worthy of her fondest affection—may evry future year add to the joy which at present fills her heart and insure not only her love but every blessing of which mankind is susceptible; the respect of your fellow Citizens, and...