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    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …
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    • Adams, John
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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Correspondent="Adams, John" AND Correspondent="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson"
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As I know how much your time must be engrossed by your studies my Dear John altho’ the temporary loss of your correspondence will grieve me I will submit to it most patiently on account of the motive which does you so much honour—I observe that you appear to be a little mortified in your last Letter at what I remarked in one of my former ones which you somewhat misunderstood—The observation I...
You have at last much to my satisfaction, renewed a correspondence which ought never to have been interrupted, and that in the most acceptable manner to your parents, by an assurance of future attention and regularity—The accounts we receive of your conduct are very flattering, and we receive them as an earnest of what we may hope and expect as you advance in life, to reward us for the many...
I am much pleased my Dear John by your Letters and hasten to answer the last which was received the day before yesterday—It was my intention to send you Miss Aikens Elizabeth but there is not a copy of it to be procured and I have not yet fixed upon any thing to supply its place—The books you mention have not fallen in my way and I have hitherto had no opportunity of perusing them but I agree...
Altho’ I write with difficulty I cannot resist the temptation and must gratify myself by writing to you and my Dear Charles even if I pay dear for it—Upon one subject the nearest to my heart I will say nothing lest I should say too much—In this world we must innure ourselves to disappointments and we must learn to meet them with patience and only remember them as incitements to greater...
Your last Letter my Dear John was indeed filled with grievous news and I sincerely pity the afflicted family who are left in a situation so melancholy—The shock must no doubt have been severe to your Grandfather although it was expected; but the strongest minds insensibly repel the idea of death until the inevitable doom is sealed, and we cannot fly from conviction by its sad and solemn...
Your sudden silence after the affectionate and unremitted attention you shewed during your dear Grandmothers illness and the total want of information since on the subject of the family in general has occasioned both your father and myself much uneasiness and we are counting the mails every day to meet fresh disappointment Your Fathers Messenger has just been and I flew down in the hope of...
I was seriously concerned to hear of your illness and am still considerably uneasy of lest you should by any imprudence have a relapse and I entreat you will be particularly careful of the Night air—You must write me frequently even if it is only to say “I am well ” as I shall be very anxious for some time I presume you are taking the Bark? what Phyissian attended you? was your complaint...
I am very uneasy my dear John at your indisposition more especially as you do not mention its nature—I hope the heaviest part of your labour is now terminated and that you will ere this Letter reaches you have acquitted yourself with honour and applause. I regret very much not being present at your exhibition still more that your father has been disappointed in consequence of the delay of the...
Your Letter my dear John was brought me just before dinner and I hasten to answer it more particularly that part of it in which you mention that Messrs. Calvert and Taylor intend leaving Cambridge a week sooner then than the commencement of the Vacation and I am authorized by your father to tell you to present his compliments to Dr. Kirkland and request he will permit you to leave Cambridge at...
Yesterday brought me your Letter my Dear John and your father and myself were both pleased to see the account you give of our dear fathers health for whom we have been very anxious for some time—According to your account I am a little afraid you will get spoilt among so many belles who will so inflate your natural vanity that you will be likely to share the fate of Narcissus—Some of these...