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    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …
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    • Adams, John
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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Correspondent="Adams, John" AND Correspondent="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson"
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8th. The morning very stormy and a heavy fall of snow sent to decline an invitation to a Ball given by the Officers of the Marine Corps at the Barracks—Went to the Presidents to dine and finding the weather quite clear sent word to Miss Buchanan to make ready to accompany us to the Ball notwithstanding our Apology—The company were nearly all assembled when we arrived—The Vice President and...
1st January. If the weather to day is ominous of the storms of the ensuing year we must not expect much quiet—Let it come—I will not flinch be the end what it may—We went to the Presidents where we found a much larger party assembled than would have been expected considering the difficulties attendant on a sortie in such an inclement day—The Corps diplomatique paid their usual compliment and...
March 4th. Took a long walk the weather being beautiful—returned home to dress for dinner at having a company of 20 to Dine with us—Some of the Ladies who have declined visiting me the whole winter have thought proper to leave cards to take leave—I understand that many of them do not return as their husbands are not re–elected and after the adjournment of Congress they dropt their rank —Our...
I am afraid that Charles has been writing some nonsense concerning Harriet Welsh which has caused you to write so disrespectfully concerning her Charl’s got hold of my papers and contrary to my most positive orders read them and then wrote you something or other not much to his credit—I therefore beg I may hear no more on this subject I am certainly very sorry to hear that you were so...
Your Letter of the 29 reached me safely the day before yesterday and as it contained information concerning your Grandfathers plans I enclosed it to your father to whom it will probably be very interesting— Your regular and constant attention to your College duties gives me the utmost pleasure and though it may not be crowned with as much success there as you hope or have a right to expect...
I am, as well as your father, much delighted at the account you give of your Grandfathers health, and heartily pray that he may long enjoy the pleasure his little Carriage at present affords him—Charles writes me that he is quite sick, and that he would probably visit Quincy in consequence of it. I wish he may, as he does not understand managing himself, and should be under the care of those...
I have just received your Letter and am very much pleased to find you all in such good spirits Why George should have roared so at the idea of your fathers dancing I do not know—but he is not the only one so affected for Mr. Walker of the Senate I thought would have fallen on the floor—Washington is becoming quite dull notwithstanding our wedding we are however to have dancing on Tuesday and...
The plan of your father to follow us as far as the cross roads to Dedham prevented my taking leave of you I therefore hasten to write you a few lines in explanation and to let you know how we go on—Our journey was tolerably pleasant until we reached Blakes at West Greenwich where the Coachman was taken sick and we were obliged to hurry on to New London as I was impatient to consult a...
15 February January —Waked so ill with cramps in my Stomach as to be unable to rise and continued so all day and towards evening was obliged to send for the Doctor who gave me opium the only thing which could afford me relief— 16 Rose much better though still suffering from a stricture across the breast—Remained at home receiving visits until three o’clock—Mr Bailey and Mr. Forbes passed the...
Your Letter pleased and displeased me; the goodness and purity of your motives can never admit of a doubt, but there are ways of doing things which sometimes make them appear harsh and unkind and the general style of your last impressed your father with the idea that you were not so affectionate and kind to your Brother as he could wish for your mutual comfort—Your brothers excentricities of...