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I should sooner have answered your Letter my Son had I not expected to hear that you had received Booth’s Journal the first Number of which was sent to you last Month its he is an object of great respect and attention to our little family here the neglect and coldness with which you appear to treat his literary production has been cause of offence to all and he has determined to retaliate by...
It is impossible for me to express the happiness I feel at the news which comes by so many different channels from Boston concerning you, & which has been so agreeably confirmed by yourself. the rapid improvement which is evident in your style & writing is itself a sufficient indication of the pains you are taking to cultivate your mind, and take all the benefit and advantage which your father...
Feby. 18th The Evening brought my expected guests or rather a small part of them and on the whole the party appeared to enjoy themselves tolerably well—The night was fearfully cold and my company left me early on account of the complaints of the Coach men who refusd to wait for them—We are drawing near a conclusion and I certainly shall not regret it—Some Music and some dancing— 19 Went out...
You tell me that the highest prize in the Lottery is only 5000 dollars therefore you have not purchased my Ticket as I wished to make an experiment of your luck I suppose you think 5000 dollars a paltry prize however I should like you to purchase me a ticket in any of the Lotteries in which you can procure one for $4 and 50 Cents, or 5 which I see advertised in all the Boston papers and beg it...
I yesterday received your highly complimentary Letter which of course gratified my affection very much. I will not say my vanity for I am by no means certain that your praise is merited; on the contrary I am almost always dissatisfied with my own Letters, which are always dictated by the impulse of the moment; very useless, and little or no attention paid either to language or style—In writing...
The day before yesterday our City was enlivened suddenly by the report of the ratification of the Spanish Treaty and every thing looked gay excepting my husband who gave no credit to the news when yesterday morning a cloud in the form of Capt Reid of the Hornet dispersed our sunshine and confirmed Mr. As doubts and destroying all the fond hopes of the too credulous citizens—Congress will of...
I will not apologize for not writing as I hate excuses none especially when they are bad or indifferent I hope your character is not changed for the worse and that whatever change may have taken place in you that your principles are still sound and fixed not withstanding I am aware that the theological controversies that are so fashionable in your part of the world are more calculated to...
& Miss Mason Capt & Mrs. Crane Mr. Kerby with several others Members of Congress—Mr. Petry came in the Eveng. and talked freely of the Bonaparté family He told me that while he was in Poland Napoleon was very much attached to a beautiful Polish Lady and that he (N.) rode fifteen miles every night during a fortnight at the risk of his life through the enemies Country to visit her—He likewise...
I am so concerned about Charles that I once more write to you on the subject and beg of you to let me know how he gets on and if you think there is any prospect of his being dismissed from College. His spirits appear to be so bad that I hope his fears are greater than there will be occasion for. But your utter silence concerning your brother is so extraordinary and when you consider his age so...
Your Letter distressed both your father and myself on account of the painful news it contained—but we were neither of us displeased with you as we were perfectly sensible of the motive both of duty and affection by which you were situated—We are still very uneasy at your Grandfathers situation altho I have had a letter from him since the receipt of yours which has induced us to hope that both...
8th: March—Was very unwell all the morning and the weather was extremely disagreeable—In the evening went to the Drawing Room which was very full—The wedding much talked of in consequence of which the Russian Minister asked me when they might pay their respects and offer their congratulations I told him I understood they were to receive their friends without form or ceremony I believed in the...
Your Letter and the pleasing information it contains has greatly delighted your father and I think you will now be rewarded by his full approbation of the exertions which you have made and which at last have proved successful—We shall certainly visit Boston as I wrote you and George has engaged to study with Mr Webster who is now here—Miss Hopkinson is at Alexandria to which place I took her...
As I know how much your time must be engrossed by your studies my Dear John altho’ the temporary loss of your correspondence will grieve me I will submit to it most patiently on account of the motive which does you so much honour—I observe that you appear to be a little mortified in your last Letter at what I remarked in one of my former ones which you somewhat misunderstood—The observation I...
You have at last much to my satisfaction, renewed a correspondence which ought never to have been interrupted, and that in the most acceptable manner to your parents, by an assurance of future attention and regularity—The accounts we receive of your conduct are very flattering, and we receive them as an earnest of what we may hope and expect as you advance in life, to reward us for the many...
I am much pleased my Dear John by your Letters and hasten to answer the last which was received the day before yesterday—It was my intention to send you Miss Aikens Elizabeth but there is not a copy of it to be procured and I have not yet fixed upon any thing to supply its place—The books you mention have not fallen in my way and I have hitherto had no opportunity of perusing them but I agree...
Altho’ I write with difficulty I cannot resist the temptation and must gratify myself by writing to you and my Dear Charles even if I pay dear for it—Upon one subject the nearest to my heart I will say nothing lest I should say too much—In this world we must innure ourselves to disappointments and we must learn to meet them with patience and only remember them as incitements to greater...
Your last Letter my Dear John was indeed filled with grievous news and I sincerely pity the afflicted family who are left in a situation so melancholy—The shock must no doubt have been severe to your Grandfather although it was expected; but the strongest minds insensibly repel the idea of death until the inevitable doom is sealed, and we cannot fly from conviction by its sad and solemn...
Your sudden silence after the affectionate and unremitted attention you shewed during your dear Grandmothers illness and the total want of information since on the subject of the family in general has occasioned both your father and myself much uneasiness and we are counting the mails every day to meet fresh disappointment Your Fathers Messenger has just been and I flew down in the hope of...
December 11th. Went into Georgetown to see Mrs Otis, was not admitted Called on Mrs Smith and Mrs Frye both very well returned home to dinner Dr Forsythe from South America called in the evening, He too was soliciting a place to which a deaf ear was turned. 12th—Not well and could not go to church; the day cold and disagreeable Mary much better. Evening alone. 13th—Went out and paid visits and...
14th December. We were all so exhausted that we determined to keep quiet all day at home. Received a Note from a Milliner requesting I would go and look at his things, this is a thing which has happened several times—Am I so much in vogue? I am solicited to take great care of myself this Winter and not to get sick, Are People afraid of closed doors again? What a hollow hearted World How much I...
Feby. 27 Remained at home all the morning—Mr. Adams dined with Mr. Lowndes—In the evening went to the French Ministers where Mr. A accompanied me it being their last public night—God save the King produced a great effect I understand last night, and the papers are to ring with it tomorrow—The managers—Those of whom were Members of Congress had determined it should not be played, and Mrs. Peter...
I was seriously concerned to hear of your illness and am still considerably uneasy of lest you should by any imprudence have a relapse and I entreat you will be particularly careful of the Night air—You must write me frequently even if it is only to say “I am well ” as I shall be very anxious for some time I presume you are taking the Bark? what Phyissian attended you? was your complaint...
I am very uneasy my dear John at your indisposition more especially as you do not mention its nature—I hope the heaviest part of your labour is now terminated and that you will ere this Letter reaches you have acquitted yourself with honour and applause. I regret very much not being present at your exhibition still more that your father has been disappointed in consequence of the delay of the...
Your Letter my dear John was brought me just before dinner and I hasten to answer it more particularly that part of it in which you mention that Messrs. Calvert and Taylor intend leaving Cambridge a week sooner then than the commencement of the Vacation and I am authorized by your father to tell you to present his compliments to Dr. Kirkland and request he will permit you to leave Cambridge at...
Yesterday brought me your Letter my Dear John and your father and myself were both pleased to see the account you give of our dear fathers health for whom we have been very anxious for some time—According to your account I am a little afraid you will get spoilt among so many belles who will so inflate your natural vanity that you will be likely to share the fate of Narcissus—Some of these...
Your last is written under such disagreeable circumstances it partook a good deal of your general discomfort in its tone and expression. I have therefore delayed my answer until your difficulties shall be smoothed and your usual equanimity returned when I know my Letter will be welcome and you will not misconstrue the affectionate anxiety of Parents who have perhaps an exaggerated idea of the...
23 March—Our City is more and more deeply unwell of fears and gloom and every moment seems to teem with more troubles—A hundred different stories are in circulation concerning this dreadful affair and I am told that his Wife has not seen him since the night before the Duel took place as instead of breakfasting at home he stopped at the Congress Hotel and there ate an unusually hearty meal...
It is so long since I have written I feel that it is difficult to offer an apology for my silence or rather such an one as would prove satisfactory: it however proceeded from the extreme dullness of the City and the excessive heat of the Summer in the first place; a journey to visit my relations in Frederick in the second; and a severe indisposition in the third which confined me to my bed...
An indisposition which confined me to my bed in the first instance and moving in the next into our house in F Street has prevented my answering your Letter earlier and my papers are all in such confusion that I cannot pretend to find it now so as to answer it correctly— Our House will hardly be well fixed before you come on and at present Charles is obliged to sleep in the Drawing room which...
Do not suffer your failure to mortify you too much my dear John—It was accidental and must not prevent your future efforts—Fortune will at length smile propitious and reward your amiable exertions—I feel most sensibly for the pain you must have suffered and only wish I had been present to alleviate it—Your Father will perhaps be a little disappointed but your desire to excel will meet with its...
8th. The morning very stormy and a heavy fall of snow sent to decline an invitation to a Ball given by the Officers of the Marine Corps at the Barracks—Went to the Presidents to dine and finding the weather quite clear sent word to Miss Buchanan to make ready to accompany us to the Ball notwithstanding our Apology—The company were nearly all assembled when we arrived—The Vice President and...
1st January. If the weather to day is ominous of the storms of the ensuing year we must not expect much quiet—Let it come—I will not flinch be the end what it may—We went to the Presidents where we found a much larger party assembled than would have been expected considering the difficulties attendant on a sortie in such an inclement day—The Corps diplomatique paid their usual compliment and...
March 4th. Took a long walk the weather being beautiful—returned home to dress for dinner at having a company of 20 to Dine with us—Some of the Ladies who have declined visiting me the whole winter have thought proper to leave cards to take leave—I understand that many of them do not return as their husbands are not re–elected and after the adjournment of Congress they dropt their rank —Our...
I am afraid that Charles has been writing some nonsense concerning Harriet Welsh which has caused you to write so disrespectfully concerning her Charl’s got hold of my papers and contrary to my most positive orders read them and then wrote you something or other not much to his credit—I therefore beg I may hear no more on this subject I am certainly very sorry to hear that you were so...
Your Letter of the 29 reached me safely the day before yesterday and as it contained information concerning your Grandfathers plans I enclosed it to your father to whom it will probably be very interesting— Your regular and constant attention to your College duties gives me the utmost pleasure and though it may not be crowned with as much success there as you hope or have a right to expect...
I am, as well as your father, much delighted at the account you give of your Grandfathers health, and heartily pray that he may long enjoy the pleasure his little Carriage at present affords him—Charles writes me that he is quite sick, and that he would probably visit Quincy in consequence of it. I wish he may, as he does not understand managing himself, and should be under the care of those...
I have just received your Letter and am very much pleased to find you all in such good spirits Why George should have roared so at the idea of your fathers dancing I do not know—but he is not the only one so affected for Mr. Walker of the Senate I thought would have fallen on the floor—Washington is becoming quite dull notwithstanding our wedding we are however to have dancing on Tuesday and...
The plan of your father to follow us as far as the cross roads to Dedham prevented my taking leave of you I therefore hasten to write you a few lines in explanation and to let you know how we go on—Our journey was tolerably pleasant until we reached Blakes at West Greenwich where the Coachman was taken sick and we were obliged to hurry on to New London as I was impatient to consult a...
15 February January —Waked so ill with cramps in my Stomach as to be unable to rise and continued so all day and towards evening was obliged to send for the Doctor who gave me opium the only thing which could afford me relief— 16 Rose much better though still suffering from a stricture across the breast—Remained at home receiving visits until three o’clock—Mr Bailey and Mr. Forbes passed the...
Your Letter pleased and displeased me; the goodness and purity of your motives can never admit of a doubt, but there are ways of doing things which sometimes make them appear harsh and unkind and the general style of your last impressed your father with the idea that you were not so affectionate and kind to your Brother as he could wish for your mutual comfort—Your brothers excentricities of...
read my Letter attentively and then tell me if you perceive any thing like harshness abou ? in it. Deep anxiety on account of your brother whose representation of his terror as to his prospects had very much affected me and a fear that you might think yourselves harshly treated made me express myself perhaps in stronger terms terms than I was aware of but could you have read my heart while I...
My Lecture was intended to warn you against imprudently expressing your feelings even in a good cause, and to guard you against misconstruction. I know your heart, and how utterly incapable you are of so selfish a feeling as that I mentioned in my last; but every body has not the same acquaintance with you, and are therefore liable to misjudge you—Your reason for making your visits less...
Having observed in the papers that the reason assigned for your declining to accept the invitation on the 4h. was on account of indisposition Mr. Adams and myself are anxious to hear from you and to be assured that it was rather the dread of over fatigue than real indisposition which caused your refusal to attend. It would have been altogether improper to make such an exertion and I rejoice...
3 April—Mr: Lowndes spoke against Mr: Cs resolutions Mr Archer of Virginia is in favour being he made a speech which however did not excite much admiration—He is a disagreeable pedantic prejudiced Virginian—A would be Randolph without merits the most necessary ingredient to promote the likeness— 4. Charles still continues quite an invalid—It was this day that the Debate took place in Congress...
My Brother much as usual. The impossibility of hastening the cure of his very painful desease in consequence of this heat affects his spirits very much and makes him fretful and gloomy; ever anticipating evil, and unwilling to enjoy present good—Poor fellow—it is surely very hard to know he would be relieved in a few days, and at the same time to suffer ly the pain, but the idea which the mind...
I do not know if I ought to congratulate you or not on your acceptance of the trouble and anxiety attending you as a Member of the Convention my dear Sir but I hope it will yield you amusement and vary your occupations we rely on your making it as easy as little laborious to yourself as possible— Congress has convened again and as you will perceive by the papers of the day they have assembled...
I last evening received your Letter of the 20h with great delight and assure you I require nothing but your word to satisfy me regarding your conduct having always had full reliance on your respect to truth—When I wrote I had heard a terrible account of the rebellion and was excessively alarmed at the consequences for you under this impression and trembling with lest George in his desire to...
My visit is delayed In consequence of the celebration of the 4th July a day of double interest to me, as the anniversary of our Independence, and of the birth of our dear John—You will have seen by the papers that your Son is to perform a conspicuous part on this occasion, for which he is all ready and thoroughly prepared—The President is here and has been invited to dine with the company, but...
Your Letter of the 22 enclosing the lines you wrote arrived yesterday and both your father and myself were much pleased with them—The idea is very pretty, and the verse nearly correct, and the two last lines are very very good, the language being truly poetical, and the image is delicate and pathetic—I laboured some time to work on the idea, but could do nothing that pleased me half so well as...
16 April—Went to Church at the Capital not full at all. Afterwards paid some visits—The remainder of the day at home— 17 No occurrence of importance—paid some visits and passed the day at home—Mr: A– dined at Mr: Politeca’s the Russian Ministers—the dinner given to Gen Vines the new Spanish Minister—much curiosity and anxiety expressed concerning the Negotiation 18 Went out in quest of company...