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12. December Mrs Frye called today to see me and I went with her to the Kings Picture Gallery and appointed Monday for her to sit to him—Her husband has one of the vilest things I ever saw which was taken by some miserable dauber —it is not fit to adorn a sign post—Had 21 visits and went out to see Mrs Calhoun Mrs Findlay, & Mrs Ingham—The former is a respectable looking elderly Lady the...
Decbr. 3 A Snow Storm—No visitors—In the evening a small party in consequence of the extreme severity of the weather—It was however tolerably pleasant—Dr. & Mrs. Thornton Mrs Key Mr & Miss Tayloe, Mr Mrs. & Miss Pleasanton, Major and Miss Selden, Dr Wrightman, Miss Hanson, Miss Aldrich Miss Forrest, Judge McLean, Mr Cook of Illinois Mr. Rhea, Mr Lear Mr. Coxe Mr. Elgar and Dr. Huntt with the...
1 December 1822 This day being in tolerable health I renew my journal with the intention to pursue it through the Winter This Winter in consequence of the intriguing for the Presidency will be such an one as will furnish sufficient incident to make it interesting—As however I collect most of the news from mere publick rumour I do not vouch for the truth of it and it will of course be subject...
I have been so much engaged the last week at races parties and Ball it has been impossible for me to answer your last Letter or to write to Charles Eclipse as you have heard ran down poor Sir Charles who was totally unfitted by his lameness to oppose the pride of the North and I confess the race as it appears to me was altogether so unequal I cannot see any thing to boast of on the winning...
It is sometime since I have written you in consequence of indisposition I have therefore two of your Letters unanswered— It was scarcely possible for so great a belle as Miss A Quincy to take particular notice of a certain young gentleman without my hearing of it—publick rumour has many tongues and though you may not yet be a subject of sufficient importance to excite attention the young Lady...
Your last is written under such disagreeable circumstances it partook a good deal of your general discomfort in its tone and expression. I have therefore delayed my answer until your difficulties shall be smoothed and your usual equanimity returned when I know my Letter will be welcome and you will not misconstrue the affectionate anxiety of Parents who have perhaps an exaggerated idea of the...
I sent you from Philadelphia an odd volume of A Sketch of Old England which I wrote your name in and addressed to Quincy—The second was stolen from me but as their some good matter in the first and as it is a book in which there is no history to break it would be worth reading though it cannot rank as a perfect work in your collection—I shall soon send you the favorite of Nature which is said...
Do not suffer your failure to mortify you too much my dear John—It was accidental and must not prevent your future efforts—Fortune will at length smile propitious and reward your amiable exertions—I feel most sensibly for the pain you must have suffered and only wish I had been present to alleviate it—Your Father will perhaps be a little disappointed but your desire to excel will meet with its...
I am much pleased my Dear John by your Letters and hasten to answer the last which was received the day before yesterday—It was my intention to send you Miss Aikens Elizabeth but there is not a copy of it to be procured and I have not yet fixed upon any thing to supply its place—The books you mention have not fallen in my way and I have hitherto had no opportunity of perusing them but I agree...
Your Letter of the 29 reached me safely the day before yesterday and as it contained information concerning your Grandfathers plans I enclosed it to your father to whom it will probably be very interesting— Your regular and constant attention to your College duties gives me the utmost pleasure and though it may not be crowned with as much success there as you hope or have a right to expect...
It is very long since I had the pleasure of writing to you. considering George a better correspondent I resigned the pen to him but being here and out of the way of hearing from you so often as I used I am induced to write and recal to your recollection some of your old friends who make frequent enquiries concerning you— Among them and perhaps the first in rank is Mrs. Powell whose age and...
My Brother much as usual. The impossibility of hastening the cure of his very painful desease in consequence of this heat affects his spirits very much and makes him fretful and gloomy; ever anticipating evil, and unwilling to enjoy present good—Poor fellow—it is surely very hard to know he would be relieved in a few days, and at the same time to suffer ly the pain, but the idea which the mind...
I yesterday received your Letter which was forwarded to me by George from Washington—Your Uncle is under the hand of Dr. Physick and it is impossible for us to know whether we can get on to Boston or not rely on it that my desire to see you would induce me to make some great effort but I shall insist on seeing you in the Winter and after that you may perhaps have an opportunity of seeing us...
read my Letter attentively and then tell me if you perceive any thing like harshness abou ? in it. Deep anxiety on account of your brother whose representation of his terror as to his prospects had very much affected me and a fear that you might think yourselves harshly treated made me express myself perhaps in stronger terms terms than I was aware of but could you have read my heart while I...
I have been much gratified at hearing of your success at the Exhibition which news has reached us in a variety of ways—It has however been suggested that your success would have been still more complete if you had spoken a little louder but this is a defect which I hope you will outgrow as your voice strengthens and by acquiring a habit of speaking in publick— I wish you would tell Mr Boylston...
I am so concerned about Charles that I once more write to you on the subject and beg of you to let me know how he gets on and if you think there is any prospect of his being dismissed from College. His spirits appear to be so bad that I hope his fears are greater than there will be occasion for. But your utter silence concerning your brother is so extraordinary and when you consider his age so...
I will not apologize for not writing as I hate excuses none especially when they are bad or indifferent I hope your character is not changed for the worse and that whatever change may have taken place in you that your principles are still sound and fixed not withstanding I am aware that the theological controversies that are so fashionable in your part of the world are more calculated to...
I yesterday received your Letter and was very much concerned to observe the depression of spirits under which you laboured, but the rapid approach of Spring will I hope restore you to all those blithsome feelings which are so charming and so natural to your nature character and disposition—. It is too true alas that in the attainment of the knowledge of human nature we are obliged to wade...
Being very well I hasten to write you and although you disclaim all merit in a certain transaction still to repeat my approbation of a conduct which does you so much honour and which I hope (although you must not expect) will be rewarded by the improvement and merit of its object—Should this not happen do not suffer the disappointment to mortify or wound your feelings or to damp any future...
Being much better in health I seize the opportunity of writing a few lines to you and your brother— There are some actions my Son that are altogether above praise and that can only be rewarded by the consciousness of having done well and deserved the approbation of the virtuous and the good—rest assured that such actions sink deep into your Mothers heart and that she prays fervently to her...
Altho’ I write with difficulty I cannot resist the temptation and must gratify myself by writing to you and my Dear Charles even if I pay dear for it—Upon one subject the nearest to my heart I will say nothing lest I should say too much—In this world we must innure ourselves to disappointments and we must learn to meet them with patience and only remember them as incitements to greater...
I should have answer’d your Letter earlier could I write with my accustomed care but it fatigues me so much I feel too much inclined to neglect my usually pleasant occupations— I received a Letter yesterday from your brother which indicates a very seriously discontented mind and makes me very apprehensive that his disposition is acquiring a habit of complaining and uneasiness calculated to...
I make no charges against you what ever and on the contrary am delighted to find that if I did you can so easily exonerate yourself from them—What I meant in my last Letter was simply to put you on your guard and to inform you that such a plea was made to your father as a reason for your not having risen higher in your Class— Georges pen is so prolific and his style so pleasant I believe I...
When at Quincy you have often reproached me for being prejudiced concerning the Unitarians and not willing to listen to listen to the truth—I now candidly confess that I understand so little what the difference is between this and other sects I should feel very thankful if you would enlighten my underst and ing upon these points at the same time requesting you not to refer me to long...
Since my return home George has so well supplied my place in writing to you and we have had so few events (save melancholy ones) to detail that I find it scarce possible to address you on any subject that can excite a moments interest—The family generally are well and Georges health we hope is rappidly mending— This day the new Spanish Minister was introduced to the President this day . He is...
In answer to your Letter of 17 which I received last evening I have only to beg that you will keep up your spirits and make every exertion to remove the impressions which your father received during his visit to Cambridge and which he is too just to retain if you convince him by your application and industry that those impressions are incorrect—Your frequent and injudicious declarations that...
The plan of your father to follow us as far as the cross roads to Dedham prevented my taking leave of you I therefore hasten to write you a few lines in explanation and to let you know how we go on—Our journey was tolerably pleasant until we reached Blakes at West Greenwich where the Coachman was taken sick and we were obliged to hurry on to New London as I was impatient to consult a...
Your father yesterday performed his part to admiration and there was as much general satisfaction expressed as could possibly be expected in a place where so many great interests and powerful passions are ever at work—He looked better than I ever saw him and was less fatigued than could have been expected or hoped It was the anniversary of your eighteenth birth day and the mingled feelings of...
My visit is delayed In consequence of the celebration of the 4th July a day of double interest to me, as the anniversary of our Independence, and of the birth of our dear John—You will have seen by the papers that your Son is to perform a conspicuous part on this occasion, for which he is all ready and thoroughly prepared—The President is here and has been invited to dine with the company, but...
Your Letter pleased and displeased me; the goodness and purity of your motives can never admit of a doubt, but there are ways of doing things which sometimes make them appear harsh and unkind and the general style of your last impressed your father with the idea that you were not so affectionate and kind to your Brother as he could wish for your mutual comfort—Your brothers excentricities of...
Your Letter reached me last Eveng. and I am very sorry to learn that your Grandfather is so feeble as it is a symtom which I am apprehensive which indicates a decay of constitution which may lead us to dread a close of his career much earlier than we any of us anticipate—Mrs. Clark’s accounts from Quincy differ very much according to her and Mrs. French and I think she would be wiser if she...
Your Letter pleased both your father and myself as your reasoning is very good and shows reflection and forethought I beg as a favour that you will take pains to intimate as delicately as you can that I have no thought of bringing either of the Girls home with me as your father will not hear of it on the very ground which you have represented—The perpetual round of company in which I live in...
Mr Roach with his Sister and daughter are to dine with us to day he tells me that he had the pleasure of seeing you and that you were in perfect health Our City is full of strangers and we have been as dissipated during the last week as we generally are in the Winter The weather is more variable and altogether worse than I ever remember it and we can scarcely be said to have left off fires...
It is now I suppose nearly a vacation time with you and you will take your flight to Quincy for a fortnight where you will no doubt enjoy yourself very much in the Society of your indulgent Grandfather and the family— Do tell me are there any hopes of Mrs. Clark’s forming a second connection—Beware of getting entangled in a quarrel with her during the vacation no matter from what cause or...
Your reproach my dear Sir was very keen and keenly felt because conscience pointed its force and added mortification to its merited sting—To make excuses will not repair the fault and the only rational one I can offer is that I have been waiting impatiently for the publication of the weights and measures and was really entirely decieved as to the length of time that had elapsed since writing...
You become so testy I almost begin to feel disinclined to write to you at all as my Letters instead of contributing to your happiness appear to produce a contrary effect—I do not think you more wild than young men of your age generally are but I think you suffer your passions frequently to master your reason and on this account I have sometimes been apprehensive that you might suffer severely...
Your last Letter is as wild yourself you will acknowledge that is saying something? As to Diana Vernon’s they begin to be so common with us that every beau call’s his fair one by that appellation— Your aversion to thirty five is greater even than I imagined it is a bad sign as I fear you will at last be caught by some fair smiling face which may carry more years over it’s head than you...
I feel a little uneasy about you and therefore write you again to give you a timely caution as there are whispers concerning the restlessness of your Class which lead me to dread an explosion Your own sense my dear Boy will teach you how foolish and imprudent it is to run any risk of expulsion or even rustication as the loss of a year to you who are so desirous of obtaining your liberty would...
I will answer your last Letter by saying that your most horrible is altogether thrown away as neither of the young Ladies who remained with us were very beautiful or fascinating but good natured pleasant girls who amused me very much by their musical talents and the eldest by a highly cultivated mind—Their ages would not have frightened you but their tall Grenadier look might have intimidated...
I have been so much indisposed it has been almost impossible for me to keep my journal and my family has been too large to admit of sufficient quiet to do any thing but partake of the amusements of the place which however have been but few comparatively speaking. It has been remarked frequently that there has never been so gloomy a session as the present and I doubt if there ever was one which...
Decbr. 3d Did not attend at Church Mr Ryland was to preach and his last sermon was such a strange medley of scraps and ends miserably put together I did not feel tempted to go again—remained at home all day. 4th The day was stormy and disagreeable—In the Eveng went into George Town to fetch Fanny Johnson. The Stage had not arrived and we drove to Mrs. Frye’s where we took Tea—She mentioned...
29th Rode out and called on my patient who is fast recovering and able to raise his broken arm—In the Evening went to the Drawing Room it was well attended though not crowded—I was teazed in the course of the evening with questions concerning how I should conduct myself in that House as mistress of it for a time for it was likely I should be there in four years I laughed and said that I...
I last evening received your Letter of the 20h with great delight and assure you I require nothing but your word to satisfy me regarding your conduct having always had full reliance on your respect to truth—When I wrote I had heard a terrible account of the rebellion and was excessively alarmed at the consequences for you under this impression and trembling with lest George in his desire to...
Novbr. 22 Spent the day at home excepting about an hour in which I paid a number of visits—Dr. Thornton called in late last Evening and chatted some time His conversation is indeed a thing of threads and patches certainly amusing from its perpetual variety—He is altogether the most excentric being I ever met with possessing the extremes of literary information and the levity and trifling of...
18th Received a number of visits and returned a few.—Mr Poletica passed the Evening with us—Talked much of his tour thro’ the Western States and appeared much pleased with his visit to Boston He informed us he had seen a gentleman lately from England who mentioned that the Queen had twice been seen drunk in Parliament before he left that Country— 19 Visitors came so early and staid so long I...
I do not know if I ought to congratulate you or not on your acceptance of the trouble and anxiety attending you as a Member of the Convention my dear Sir but I hope it will yield you amusement and vary your occupations we rely on your making it as easy as little laborious to yourself as possible— Congress has convened again and as you will perceive by the papers of the day they have assembled...
How grieved I am my dear John at the news we have just received you may concieve who knew what an effect the same circumstance produced on me on a former occasion—Your father and I are in a state of great anxiety for the consequences of your fault and impatiently wait for the result which must fix your future destiny—Write me immediately and let me know how the Government feel towards you so...
An indisposition which confined me to my bed in the first instance and moving in the next into our house in F Street has prevented my answering your Letter earlier and my papers are all in such confusion that I cannot pretend to find it now so as to answer it correctly— Our House will hardly be well fixed before you come on and at present Charles is obliged to sleep in the Drawing room which...
It is so long since I have written I feel that it is difficult to offer an apology for my silence or rather such an one as would prove satisfactory: it however proceeded from the extreme dullness of the City and the excessive heat of the Summer in the first place; a journey to visit my relations in Frederick in the second; and a severe indisposition in the third which confined me to my bed...
As I have already said every thing on the subject of your last which was necessary I will only make one observation which is that reputation is always proved by actions and the less we say about generally the better we guard it and preserve it— You are now verging on the Vacation. Are you likely to have a brilliant Commencement? who are the graduates of Note?—Who makes an entertainment?—. We...