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    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …
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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Correspondent="Adams, John" AND Correspondent="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson"
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Feby 13—A very bad cold—The day very stormy which prevented my going out—Mr. Bailey passed the evening with us—The question on Genl. Jackson’s affairs appears to be given up in the Senate—The popular opinion is too favourable—and though the Gentleman from Georgia who is to take the lead, might have found it useful in procuring the attention of the Ministry in the Country which he is about to...
Feby. 18th The Evening brought my expected guests or rather a small part of them and on the whole the party appeared to enjoy themselves tolerably well—The night was fearfully cold and my company left me early on account of the complaints of the Coach men who refusd to wait for them—We are drawing near a conclusion and I certainly shall not regret it—Some Music and some dancing— 19 Went out...
Your two last Letters would have been answered much sooner if they I had not been constantly engaged and prevented either by visitors at home or visiting abroad from writing or in fact doing anything—I think still you were mistaken about your having a Letter on my file which I had not attended to but you have assigned so excellent a reason for your silence which I ought to have recollected...
Feby. 27 Remained at home all the morning—Mr. Adams dined with Mr. Lowndes—In the evening went to the French Ministers where Mr. A accompanied me it being their last public night—God save the King produced a great effect I understand last night, and the papers are to ring with it tomorrow—The managers—Those of whom were Members of Congress had determined it should not be played, and Mrs. Peter...
March 4th. Took a long walk the weather being beautiful—returned home to dress for dinner at having a company of 20 to Dine with us—Some of the Ladies who have declined visiting me the whole winter have thought proper to leave cards to take leave—I understand that many of them do not return as their husbands are not re–elected and after the adjournment of Congress they dropt their rank —Our...
8 March—Had a party of 48 or 50 in the evening which was less dull than I could possibly have flattered myself—Cards & music—Mr. A. dined with Genl Jackson who seems to think he is not fairly treated by the Executive—Engaged to accompany Mrs. Middleton to the theatre tomorrow evening— 9th. So unwell all day was obliged to stay at home and nurse—Reading Mr. Laws Book on Instinctive Impulses—It...
My Lecture was intended to warn you against imprudently expressing your feelings even in a good cause, and to guard you against misconstruction. I know your heart, and how utterly incapable you are of so selfish a feeling as that I mentioned in my last; but every body has not the same acquaintance with you, and are therefore liable to misjudge you—Your reason for making your visits less...
You reproach me unjustly my dear John and I suspect you received a long letter from me the 15 or 16 of the Month, in answer to your last; so that I am not so heavily indebted as you pretend It is very flattering to me, and affords me unspeakable pleasure, to find you so desirous of obtaining Letters from me, and it is so gratifying to me to seize every opportunity of evincing my affection for...
Your Letter of the 22 enclosing the lines you wrote arrived yesterday and both your father and myself were much pleased with them—The idea is very pretty, and the verse nearly correct, and the two last lines are very very good, the language being truly poetical, and the image is delicate and pathetic—I laboured some time to work on the idea, but could do nothing that pleased me half so well as...
I have been so unwell the whole of this week my dear John, it has not been in my power to answer your Letter as soon as I wished—I observe all you say, and only answer that when you read Books worthy of remarks I will write you as fully as I do Charles who almost always gives me a subject—The Children of the Abbey, is a pretty thing, excessively romantic, but not calculated by any means to...