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This day two hundred years our adventurous Ancestors landed at Plymouth—and two years hence will compete two hundred years since a more jolly company of them landed at Mount Wollaston—I have been made an honourary member of the new Plymouth Institution, and have been urged with warm invitations to go and Celebrate the day, and hear the Oratory of Mr Webster which I doubt not will be...
Thanks for your Journal of the 26th. There is in human nature a germ of superstition, which has cost mankind very dear, and there is an other germ the love of finery, and which has done almost as much harm, and both have been employed with great sagacity by temperal and spiritual politicians to debase, degrade and subdue mankind, even with their own consent under the cruel iron rod of...
Thanks for your Journal of the 26th. There is in human nature, a germe of superstition which has cost mankind very dear; And there is another germe, the love of finery, And which has done almost as much harm, And both have been employed with great sagacity by temporal, and spiritual politicians, to debase, degrade and subdue mankind, even with their own consent under the cruel iron rod of...
Last night I received and read your lovely Letter of the 11th: As the three Cantabridgeans were here—they and I and all the family Uncle Aunt and Cousins all enjoyed the Luxury of it at Supper. It made a great impression on all of Us, especially upon George who with great dignity enjoined it upon his Brothers to lay the contents of it to heart. We all rejoice in the hope of seeing you in July...
As I consider y’r ladyship as always imprison’d during a session of Congress I congratulate you upon y’r jail delivery by their rise they have not been very angry during this session consequently not very entertaining—our two sons arrived here in good health & spirits at the proper season and a furious snow wh’ blocked up all the roads detain’d them here for three or four days and enliven’d my...
I have to thank you for two amiable letters—the last is of too great importance for me to answer, to your satisfaction, or my own—I am myself too much under the influence of prejudices to have ever, have, reproached you seriously with yours. —As long as association of ideas and feelings and the consequent power of habit shall be a constituent part of the constitution of human nature; so long...
Mr Henry Warren, a Son of your late friend Dr John Warren—and a young lawyer of promising hopes is a bout to travel to Washington—and will have the honour to deliver you this letter—I hope you will receive him with the utmost cordiality, for his Name and Blood are very dear to me The last news we have from your Sons—was their visit to Mr Boyleston last Saturday—In fine health and Spirits—to...
one week more will effectually relieve you from your ennui which perhaps may be succeeded by fatigues more difficult to bear—if not more dangerous to Health— Kings of England when they have wished to carry some great point with Parliament, have informed that Assembly that the Eyes of all Europe were upon them it—and it may be safely said that the eyes of all Europe, and of all America North...
Your Journal beginning the third of the month has given me great pleasure. You are much to be envied and much to be pitied; such a variety of good Company is very desirable, but so much cerimoney and such fatigues must be rather burdensome.— We have received this morning the annunciation of Mr. Clays “GREAT UNKNOWN VOLUME OF GHENTISH HISTORY ” It will appear I presume at least as soon as the...
I have received your journal to the third of June—which is entertaining and Instructing as usual— We have reports in circulation here that many Mr Randolph or Roanoke is in a state of insanity—and many say he is confined—I wish to know the truth—for although Mr Randolph has appeared through his whole public life to be possessed of a Demoniacal Spirit of Malice and Vengence without cause...
If Nature in scattering her bounties had bestowed upon me the genius of a Poet or a Painter I would entertain you with a description of a scene of sublimity, beauty, and novelty, such as eighty four winters never before presented to my sight: when I arose in the morning, the Sun was rising, the heavens were not of Brass but the Sky was a vast concave of clear blue marble and the earth was of...
As I take a great interest in your pleasures, and your troubles, your last Journal has given me a large share of both—the social scenes are delightful and the prospect of trouble is afflicting—I am interested too in the Journey of our Collegians who came here on Thursday—sett all the Tailors with their Needles in Motion—and on Saturday went to Boston with their Uncle who fitted them off with...
I have received your journal to the third of June—which is entertaining and Instructing as usual— We have reports in circulation here that Mr. Randolph of Roanoke is in a state of insanity, and many say he is confined—I wish to know the truth—for although Mr. Randolph has appeared through his whole Public life to be possessed of a Demoniacal Spirit of Malice and Vengeance without cause against...
Your journal to the 21st. ult—has given me much amusement and much pleasure I want to touch upon twenty things but that number is too great. The Missouri question is the most magnificent and portentous. I have no doubt of the right of Congress to stop the progress of Slavery, and if I were disposed to give you my reasons I Should think it unnecessary since I have read a review of Judge Story &...
Your favor of the 16th. is a reviving cordial in which I have languished for a fortnight—But I have to complain, that it is only two days, since I heard since I heard of George’s misfortune. I suppose it has been concealed in tenderness to me, but I wish to hear the worst of bad news from the begining. This tenderness for me has concealed many misfortunes which if they had been communicated to...
your journals grow more and more entertaining and instructive—you ask my Opinion of General Jackson—and you shall have it—Hero and a Conqueror I cannot say that he has transgressed the Law of Nations in any one point—certainly neither Spain nor England has any right to complain; if he has transgressed any punctilios of the Constitution neither Spain nor England have anything to do with...
I have received yours of the 3d.—I can only say if Susan will return to me with her Child and live in my complicated Family—she will be welcome to my heart—I will protect her at all hazards, as long as I live, and I will keep peace in my house, as long as I shall have the means, and the power—she must return to me, and there must not and shall not be family bickerings— Your Children have given...
I thank you for your journals and pray you to continue them for they are a refreshing amusement to me in my desolation and solitude for such is my real condition through your three Sons visit me commonly once a week and cheer my drooping spirits and although my neighbours and friends are universally kind to me and solace my sorrows as much as they can and what is much more even my enemies seem...
I have received your last Journal, and thank you for it. When the Lady asked you which you prefered, the Illiad, or Paradise lost, you should have answered her as we New-England people do, by asking her another question, pray Madam do you read the Illiad in Greek, or in Pope. I wonder not that you threw your arms round your husband upon reading his answer to General Smyth, I would have done...
your Journal interesting to me like all the former, has been received up to the 29th of March.— The people of this Country when they are prejudiced against a Man, or a Name,—will not suffer him to take the least notice of any of his relations, however distant—tho their merits and service’s may have been ever so great—but when they are prejudiced in favour of a Man, or a Name they will applaud...
I have received your journal to the 17th. April, which like all your other journals has afforded me a delicious entertainment though they contain so many lamentable historys Decaturs fall is an awfull event if their is anything awfull in this lower World— I have read Ivanhoe and there is nothing more awfull in that—my Taste Coincides with yours in this instance entirely—the divine Rebecca far...
Thanks for your favor of the third—With great pleasure I learn that you are all convalescent, and that your Brother is well and intends us a visit with you—Our John performed his part at the Exhibition with applause and approbation; But something has happened since, that has brought him here, where I wish he could remain, till next August twelve months, but I cannot advise him so, for his...
With no less gratitude than astonishment I have received your Alcibiades,—and your Sons shall have it—but I am really concerned for your Health. How it is possible that a Gay Lady of Washington amidst all the ceremony’s, frivolity’s, and gravities, of a Court, and of a Legislature—Can find time to write so many and so excellent Letters to me; to her Children, and at the same time, translate...
If after your example I could have keept a Journal—from the fifteenth of November, to the eighteenth of December—I could have given you a Curious history— I have had the Influenza, and with great difficulty have got the better of it—but not perfectly cured—I attended every day the Convention and the Air of that Hall—Instead of curing my Cold imperceptably increased it from day to day—And the...
I have this moment received your journal up to the 15th. of this Month—and I hasten to answer the last question in it Mr John Randolph certainly never wrote to me requesting letters of recommendation for any of his friends—And if any one has reported such a Slander of him, it is certainly very abusive—I cannot imagin who can have suggested such an idea to you—he would scorn the imputation with...
I have to thank you for two amiable letters—the last is of too great importance for me to answer to your satisfaction or my own. I am myself too much under the influence of prejudices to have ever reproached you seriously with yours. As long as association of ideas & feelings and the consequent power of habit shall be a constituent part of the constitution of human nature so long will all men...
I can hardly believe my Eyes when I look upon your letter of the 13th. of October at Philadelphia, and recollect that it has not been acknowledged; and the comfortable intelligence of your safe arrival in that City, ought not to have been so long forgotten: Since that time, we have no intelligence from your family except a letter from Master Charles, to Master Thomas, by which I am happy to...
your Letter has given me great delight Mrs Monroe has done herself great honour, and a durable Service to her Country, by the Example She has Sett by reversing the System of dissipation of her Predecessor. Madam Bingham and the Queen of France are not proper Models for a “Presidante” of the U.S. I most cordially approve of your Plan and that of your husband They wish him to Spend whole Nights...
yours to the 6th. is received, Our Sons of Harvard took leave of us this Morning for Cambridge in good health and Spirits—they arrived here the 16th. somewhat fatigued but very well—Their Uncle is gone to Boston with them to fit them out for Cambridge— I have this Morning learnt the death of my Patriarchal friend William Ellery in his 94th. year—which is a greater age than human Nature can...
Your last journal has so much Philosophy, and Religion, in it—that I am convinced you are a sincere inquirer after truth—God bless and Prosper you in the pursuit.— I am Informed by your Son—my dear Name Sake—that you propose to be here by the first of July—I pray you to be sure—that you arrive hear before that day.—bring your Husband with you—If the President can wander round the Universe and...
My thanks are due to you, for your kind favour of the 27th. of January—I am sorry to hear that you have been so seriously indisposed—I have been myself confined to my House since the 18th. of December, thirty odd days in punctual attendance in Convention; And almost as many luxurious dinners in the best of Company in the World—And as many Visits to Widows, as if I was looking out for another...
Your Journal to the 20th has Sett me on fire. Give my respectfull Compliments to Mr Clay and tell him that I Sincerely Unite with You—in Your request that he would bring in a Bill to Settle the Ettiquette of the United States. The debates in Congress Upon that important Subject, will amuse, divert, instruct and edify me to the End of my Life. I pitty Mrs Monroe; I pitty Mrs H; but above all I...
I am glad to learn from your favour of 25. of May, that you have Seen Mr and Miss Roach. They had Eyes and Ears to perceive the eternal person; but not feelings to Sympathize with the internal Griefs Paines Anxieties Solicitudes and inquietudes within. I will not however complain. No Man had ever more cause of Gratitude. In all the Vicisstudes terrors, Vexations and Perplexities and Agitations...
With high spirits I received the hand writing and the journal of the 1st. of this Month. I opened gay hopes before me for the Winter I rejoice in the recovery of you health, and to hear of the good health of you all— Mr. Adams, his Lady and Son appear to enjoy a serene and patient tranquility under the pelting of this pitiless Storm of political hail the thunder is not loud, and the Lightning...
Your journal ending 13th feb has given me a mixture of allarm and delight, allarm for your health and delight in your reflections. Mr. Jeffersons advice to translate the friendly epistle Don Onis and Mr. Irving into French and send them to Europe made me laugh outright—the expectation from Mr. Madison of a condemnation of his friend Monroe made me smile—but the threat to apply to me to condemn...
One Week more will effectually relieve you from your ennui, which perhaps may be succeeded by fatigues more difficult to bear, if not more dangerous to Health— Kings of England when they have wished to carry some great point with Parliament, have informed that Assembly, that the Eyes of all Europe were upon it—And it may be safely said that the Eyes of all Europe, and of all America, North and...
I have received your last Journal and found it entertaining though you seem to think so little of it; I have infinitely less to write to you, Though you seem to think your journal infinitely little, nevertheless as our friend Shaw is with me, and willing to write for me, I will gossip with you a little.— The Newspapers of this part of the World are blazing with republications of Mr. Adams’s...
Your journal up to the 20th. has as usual given me much pleasure and information; it shows very sufficiently that the great exertions which your situation demands of you, have exhausted your strength and rendered a relaxation absolutely necessary for you; I rejoice therefore that Congress have but three or four days to live; and when that body expires you will be at liberty; and when that body...
My Eyes were delighted with your handwriting this Morning—And my heart Cheered with the Contents of the letter Your apology for the interruption of your Correspondence is amply sufficient, and indeed as I have previously found in my own reflections apologys for you, It was more than was necessary—I am delighted with your studing Latin—The Town of Quincy have been pleased to Elect one a Member...
Compliments of the Season, and what is better prayers that you may enjoy the present year and as many future years as you can endure in health Peace and Competence—I congratulate you, on your having your Olive plants round about you—though the two Collegians have not been dutiful enough to send me a journal of their journey—nor an account of their arrival at their Paternal Mansion—a Residence...
Oh! that I could visit Philadelphia! and run about as I did Forty Eight years ago—to Roman Catholic Churches, Quaker meetings Anabaptist Churches, Methodistical Churches, Swedenborgian Churches—and Presbyterian Churches Not one Congregational Church could I find. Nor of a Unitarian Church was the possibility conceived by any one in that City. Tell Mrs Powell however, that I would now visit her...
Your journal which has become a necessary of life to me has failed me for so a long a time but I must excuse it because it too severe a tax upon you & I hope & presume that George is too deeply absorbed in the studies of his profession to be able to spare time to copy your records. We are here in a newspaper flurry of flickerings for Govenor & they will associate your husband with Mr Otis as...
Wonderful Woman, wife of a wonderful Man, How it is possible for you with your delicate Constitution and tender Health, to go through such a hurry of Visits, Dinners, and parties, Converse with such a variety, of Characters, masculine, and Feminine, and at the same time keep so particular a Journal. Yours of the 14th of December, up to the 30th. has arrived this Morning. your journal is a kind...
Human Life has been to me a State of trial from my Cradle to this seventh month of my Eaighty fourth year.— I believe enough of the Apocalypse to be perfectly convinced—“that “be thou faithful unto the death, and thou shalt receive a Crown of Life.”— Susan may depend upon it that her Mother, her Sister, her Brother in Law, her Female Associates in Quincy, and its neighbourhood, have been more...
I hope We have not forgotten each other! We wait with impatience for the weighty and immeasurable Report. I am afraid I shall not live long enough to read it, if to see it. Our Harvardinians call upon Us, now and then and are always received with open Arms. George continues to maintain his Character as a Speaker; John is coming to consideration. But Charles is the reserved and the thoughtful...
I have received your Journal to the 22d March—and have read them with so much delight—that I long to receive those that are to come as far as the present day— Before I proceed to any other topic, I here comply with Mr Adams request—and inclose the Seal of his Mothers Arms—By the Greyhound for the Crest—and the Birds, I conclude her ancesters were Country squires and Sportsmen—whether the birds...
Your journal which has become a necessary of life to me has failed me for a long time, but I must excuse it because it is too severe a tax upon you, and I hope and presume that George is too deeply absorbed in the studies of his profession to be able to spare time to copy your records. We are here in a news-paper flurry of flickenings for Governour and they will associate your Husband with Mr....
Your three last journals are three Pearls—I have not been able to thank you for either—untill now, they bear the form and impression of the age—they let me into the Characters of Statesmen, Politicians, Orators, Pacts, Courtiers, Convivialists, dancers Dandy’s and above all, of Ladies of whom I should no Nothing, without your kind assistance—I am a little surprised at the depth of your...