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    • Rush, Benjamin
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    • Madison Presidency
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    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Author="Rush, Benjamin" AND Period="Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
Results 11-20 of 71 sorted by relevance
Your letter of August 1st is still unanswered. It is full of truth, and useful information and reflections. I regret that my son did not state the impressment of seamen being in 1807 an Act of the British Government. It would have obviated One of the Objections to the War by the Minority in Congress. Our Country is divided into two great parties called Fedarists and Democrats. The former are...
Although for many years past I have read nothing, but books upon medicine on week days, & upon Religion on Sundays, and have expected to continue to do so as long as I lived, yet you have almost persuaded me to read Fox’s history of James the Second. Your praise of it is enough for me, for I know how much your habits of reading and thinking qualify you to judge of the merit of books that...
Your two letters of yesterday & to day have made me serious. They discover a profound knowledge of times past, present & to come. I have directed one of my daughters to copy two sentences from your letter of this day to be sent to my son Richard at Washington who, poor fellow! is swamped in a beleif of the infallibility and perpetuity of the “powers that are”. I know he reveres your judgment....
Herewith th r ough the politeness of Mr Quincy you will receive the Coins for your son. I regret that some of them are not recently coined. None such have been issued lately from the mint. Your Son Thomas’s friend Mr Erving has paid me for them. Permit me to Congratulate you upon your Son John’s honourable Appointment to a Seat upon the bench of the United States. It gives great Satisfaction...
Act 1. Scene 2nd. Mr Adams alone in his Study. Enter B Rush. A: Aye Rush is that you? What is that paper you hold in your hand? R A Summary view of the physical, moral and immoral effects of certain hymns upon the body & mind of man & upon his Condition in Society. Permit me Sir to request your Acceptance of it. A What must I do with it? R: Send it to the parson of your parish, but if he “too...
I began a long & confidential letter to you two weeks ago upon the Subject of one of your late letters, but an unusual pressure of business has prevented my finishing it. Judge of my the nature & extent of my engagements, when I add, that after lecturing twice, and visiting my normal number of patients this day, and entertaining some of my pupils at tea, I have since written six Answers to...
Mr Jefferson and I exchange letters Once in six, nine or twelve Months. This day I received a few lines from him in which he introduces your Name in the following Words. After mentioning the Visit paid to you by his two neighbours—the Messrs Coles last summer he adds, “Among Other things he [Mr Adams] adverted to the unprincipled licenciousness of the press against myself—adding— I always...
I return you Col Smiths & Dr Waterhouse’s letters The former is replete with good Sense. Alas! the evils of party Spirit! It is a greater Curse to our country than our War with Great Britain. It sacrifices every to itself . Unless appointements are made hereafter with a more wise and impartial hand, our Union cannot last. I am afraid the app situation in the medical department of the Army...
Accept of my thanks for your last letter.—I enclose you a few numbers of the Aurora. Shall we descend in a Calm or a storm to the our Graves? We are told your son is gone to Petersburg to put a torch to the flame of War, and that we are to be Allies of France and of all the powers on the Baltic in it. Mr Jackson has just left our city. He has been visited & entertained by Some of our first...
You have so far outdreamed me in your last letter, that I shall be afraid hereafter to let my imagination loose in that Mode of exposing folly and Vice.—My whole family was delighted in contemplating you upon your rostrum in the Garden of Versailles, and in witnessing the effects of your Speech upon your hairy, featherd and scaly Audience. Let it not be said “De republica America fabula...