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    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Author="American Commissioners" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
Results 61-90 of 280 sorted by editorial placement
Copy: Library of Congress We hereby request That you would pay Such Bills as shall be drawn on you upon Our Acct. by the Honl. Wm. Lee Esqr. or the honl. Ralph Izard Esqr. for any sums they may have Occasion for To the Amount of Two Thousand Louis D’orrs to each of them. We are sir Your most Obedient Humble Servants (Signed) Notation by Franklin: Letter of Credit written to M. Grand for Messrs...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society Yours of the 6th. came to hand in Course; as Mr. W. Lee will be with you before the receipt of this we refer you to him for what has been done as to the Late Mr. Morris’s Papers &c. In regard to the Ship purchased by you, Commanded by Capt. J. Green which you Offer to assign over to the Public account we are content that you do it and Charge the amount to...
LS : South Carolina Historical Society; transcript and two copies: National Archives We have now the Pleasure of sending you the Treaties of Amity and Alliance with France compleated after long Deliberation and signed the 6th. Instant. This is an Event that will give our States such an Appearance of Stability, as must strengthen our Credit, encourage other Powers in Europe to ally themselves...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society We have given Capt. Courter whom we have entrusted with our Dispatches one hundred Louis D’Ors: His Journey to Corogne will be very expensive. He will keep an Account of his Expences which he will give you and we recommend him to you for such further allowance, independant of the Actual expence of his Voyage, as you shall judge adequate to his Services. He...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society We Deliver you herewith our Letters and Dispatches for Congress which you will take Care of, and on no account Let them go out of your Possession until you deliver them up to the Hon’ble Committee of Foreign Affairs. On your embarking secure them in a Proper manner for being Sunk, in Case of being actually taken by the Enemy. We give you 100 Louis D’ors for...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society This will be handed you by Capt. Courter who goes express with our Dispatches to Congress and is to inform you that we have wrote by the Capt. of the Frigate in which Capt. Courter takes Passage, for you to Pay the Capt. of said Frigate the Sum of 15,000 Livres money of France which Letter of ours we are Confident will meet with due honor; and we have...
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; copy: Harvard University Library The News you have receiv’d from England cannot be true. No Treaty would be entred into with Howe by Washington, when the Congress was at hand: And Howe could have no Propositions to make but such as were authoris’d by the Act of Parliament, and had been long since rejected, (viz.) Pardon upon Submission ....
LS and transcript: National Archives; incomplete copy: Massachusetts Archives; copy: Harvard University Library Our Dispatches of Decr. 18. which would have acquainted you with the State of our Affairs here, and our Expectations of a speedy Conclusion of the Treaties with this Court, are unfortunately returned; the French Man of War which went on purpose to carry them, having met with some...
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; copy: Harvard University Library Being desirous of a conference with you on a subject, that appears to us of importance; we shall be glad to meet you here, or at Versailles, as soon as may be convenient to you. We have the honor to be, with the greatest respect, Sir, Your most Obedient and most Humble Servants Notation: 1778. Mars 4. Both...
AL (draft): American Philosophical Society As soon as the Commissioners to this Court shall have completed any Treaties here and it is in their Power to communicate them, you may depend on their Readiness to comply with your Request. And whenever you shall think proper to appoint a Meeting for the purpose of conferring with them on the other Points mention’d in the Letter you honour’d them...
Copy: Connecticut Historical Society The quantity of Stores you have on hand and the difficulty you find in shipping them induces us to accept of Mr. Monthieus proposal of taking his Goods out of the Mercury and loading intirely with the Stores of the public. Mr. Montieu has made that offer taking the same rate of Freight for the whole as was agreed for the quantity actually loaded already. We...
Copy: the Marquess of Abergavenny, Eridge Castle, Sussex (1955) When the Ancestors of the present Inhabitants of the United States of America first settled that Country, they did it entirely at their own expence; The public of England never granted one Shilling to aid in their Establishment. Georgia is an exception for which public grants have been made. Had any such grants been ever made they...
(I) AL (draft): Library of Congress; incomplete LS : New-York Historical Society; copies: Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères, Koninklijk Huisarchief, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two); (II) AL (draft): Library of Congress; copies: Koninklijk Huisarchief, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (three); (III) AL (draft): Library of Congress;...
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères <Passy, April 10, 1778: Mr. Adams, appointed by Congress to replace Mr. Deane, has arrived and will wait on you as soon as he recovers from his voyage. He came on a continental frigate, which took a prize with a cargo valued at £70,000. Congress is detaining Gen. Burgoyne and his army for a breach of the convention, and has more than 10,000...
AL (draft): American Philosophical Society; copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two) We thank you for the civility of your favor of the 30th. ulto. and shall be obliged to you for the earliest communication of any interesting News that may reach your Port. We have the honor to be &c. &c. In Arthur Lee’s hand, on the verso of Bondfield’s letter above of March 30. The...
AL (draft): American Philosophical Society; copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two) We have done by our Friends at Amsterdam, who have followed our Orders, every thing that we thought incumbent on us to do relative to your Affairs, and We do not incline to have any further Concern with them. In reply to Merckle’s letter above of March 26, which Lee endorsed as given...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two) <Passy, April 13, 1778: We are unable to comply with your request because the papers are Mr. William Lee’s; he is in Frankfurt, where you may be able to reach him by letter. Neither can we make further advances. We wish you to account for the goods bought with the funds we provided, but we cannot make a complete settlement; the...
ALS : Harvard University Library; two copies: Massachusetts Historical Society; copy: National Archives <Passy, April 13, 1778: We received yours of the 1st and congratulate you on your voyage. As soon as you are ready, and if you can fully man your ship, we suggest that you cruise in distant seas where the crew will have the chance of ample profits and of best serving their country. But we...
(I) AL (draft): American Philosophical Society; copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two); (II) AL (incomplete draft): Library of Congress We are sorry to inform you, that the state of our funds admits of no farther expenditure without danger of bringing us into great difficulties. It is therefore our desire that you will abstain from any farther purchases, and close...
Copy: Massachusetts Historical Society <Passy, April 15, 1778: Please provide Capt. Tucker with the needed provisions and ask him to be as frugal as possible. We approve the suggestion in your letter of the 10th that pig iron be exchanged for anchors, which are much needed. Ship a chest of medicines and slops for the crew and make sure that the men are properly charged for what they receive.>...
ALS : Harvard University Library; copy: Massachusetts Historical Society We this Moment had the Pleasure of your Letter from Bourdeaux of Ap. 11. and approve of your Activity in getting your Ship ready for Sea. We have this Day dispatched to Captain Palmes your Orders for your future Government, and shall write this Day to Mr. Bondfield to supply you with all necessary Provisions, and are your...
AL (draft): Library of Congress The interest which the public has in the vessel you command makes us regard her as a continental Ship of war. Mr. Hodge and Mr. Ross have therefore no right to direct or controul you. Neither had Mr. Deane alone any right to dispose of the vessel; nor of the produce of the prizes you made, as Monsr. Lagonere informs us he has done. You will give us an account...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives; incomplete copy: National Archives; fragment of ALS : Musée de Blérancourt We have received a Complaint from the remaining Part of your Officers and Crew, of an unfair distribution of Prize Money by Mr. Hodge. To prevent any Such Complaints in future, We desire that you will put your Prizes into the Hands of Messieurs Gardoqui at...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two) <Passy, April 19, 1778: Mr. Deane left no account from you of the approximately 100,000 l.t. in public funds that you have received. Capt. Conyngham writes that you have claimed the Revenge as your and Mr. Ross’s property, and the crew writes that you have taken the cargoes of her prizes and have unfairly distributed the prize...
ALS : Harvard University Library The Bearer of this, Captn. Livingston, is understood by us to be well qualified for the Office of Lieutenant in your Ship. If upon discoursing with him, you should be of the same Opinion, you will fill up with his Name the enclos’d Commission and date the same upon the Day. We leave this Matter to your Judgment; for tho’ we have a good Opinion of the Gentleman...
LS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères <Passy, April 19, 1778: We hear from Bordeaux and Nantes that high insurance rates and British captures create almost an embargo on shipping to America, which defeats the aim of the treaty. We earnestly request you to provide convoys.> Published in Taylor, Adams Papers , VI , 42. In WTF ’s hand.
AL (draft): Library of Congress Your Bill upon our Banker was not paid, because it was drawn without our leave; and before you had sent us the Accounts to shew we were your Debtors. When we have examind your Accounts and found them just; we shall give you Notice, that our Banker will pay your Draft for the Sum due. We conceive you cannot with any sort of propriety require payment sooner. We...
AL (draft): Library of Congress We desire you will not pay Mr. Bersolle’s Bill. His demand for payment before he had sent the Accounts to us and we had examind them, is unjust. You will also avoid for the future accepting Bills which we are to pay; or giving yourself the trouble of doing in our name what you have not our authority to do. We are, Sir, Your most Obedient Servants By Lee; see the...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two); incomplete drafts: Library of Congress <Passy, April 22–May 3, 1778: You wrote us that you would, if desired, send the invoices of goods shipped for the public. We asked for them, to account for the money advanced you. Your reason for refusing, in yours of the 18th, is inadequate; send us all the accounts, and a copy of our...
Copies: National Archives (two), Massachusetts Historical Society Your Bill upon our Banker was not paid, because it was drawn without our Leave; and before you had sent Us the Accounts to shew we were your Debtors, and he could not regularly pay a Bill on our Account, which he had not our Orders to pay. We are Sir, your most obedient Servants. Published in Butterfield, John Adams Diary , IV ,...