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    • Adams, John
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    • Adams, Abigail (daughter of JA …
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    • Revolutionary War
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    • Adams, John

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail (daughter of JA and AA)" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Correspondent="Adams, John"
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Your Solicitude for your Papa is charming: But he is afraid to trust you to the uncertain Elements, and what is infinitely more mischievous, the follies and depravities of the old world, which is quite as bad as that before the Flood. He has therefore determined to come to you, in America, next Summer, if not next Spring. Duty and Affections where due. RC or Dupl , in Charles Storer’s hand (...
In your letter to your brother, which is a very pretty one, you express a wish that you understood French. At your age, it is not difficult to learn that language; patience and perseverance is all that is wanting. There are two ways, which are sure. One is to transcribe, every day, some passages from the best authors. Another is to conjugate the verbs, in writing, through all the modes and...
By this time, I hope, your inclination to travel has abated, and the prospect of peace has made you more contented with your native country. You little know the difficulties of a voyage to Europe, even in time of profound peace. The elements are as unstable in peace as in war, and a sea life is never at first agreeable, nor ever without danger. In foreign countries few persons preserve their...
I hope by this Time, you can write an handsome Hand; but I wish you would, now and then, send a Specimen of it, to Philadelphia to your Pappa, that he may have the Pleasure of observing the Pro­ ficiency you make, not only in your Hand Writing, but in your turn of Thinking, and in your Faculty of expressing your Thoughts. You have discovered, in your Childhood, a remarkable Modesty,...
Your obliging letter of 3d September, I have received, and read with all the tenderness of a father deprived of the dearest, and almost the only enjoyment of his life, his family. I never receive a packet from your mamma without a fit of melancholy that I cannot get over for many days. Mine has been a hard lot in life, so hard that nothing would have rendered it supportable, especially for the...
If I could send you some of the Lemons, Oranges, or Water Melons of this Place, it would give me more Pleasure than you. But there are very seldom merchant Vessells at this Place from America. We are here in the Latitude of 43, which is better than half a degree farther north than Boston, yet there has not yet been the slightest frost. The Verdure on the Fields and in the Gardens is as fresh...
I have been this Afternoon, to a Place of Worship, which I never attended before. It is the Church of the Scotch Seceeders. They have a tolerable Building, but not yet finished. The Congregation is not large, and the People are not very genteel. The Clergyman, who officiates here, is a Mr. Marshall, a Native of Scotland, whose Speech is yet thick and broad, altho he has officiated in this...
I cannot recollect the tenderness and dutiful affection you expressed for me, just before my departure, without the most sensible emotion, approbation, and gratitude. It was a proof of an amiable disposition, and a tender feeling heart. But my dear child, be of good cheer; although I am absent from you for a time, it is in the way of my duty; and I hope to return, some time or other, and enjoy...
I have received your charming letter, which you forgot to date, by Mrs. Rogers. Your proposal of coming to Europe to keep your papa’s house and take care of his health, is in a high strain of filial duty and affection, and the idea pleases me much in speculation, but not at all in practice. I have too much tenderness for you, my dear child, to permit you to cross the Atlantic. You know not...
I condole with you, most sincerely, for the loss of your most worthy grandmamma. I know you must be afflicted at this severe stroke. She was an excellent instructress to you, and a bright example of every amiable virtue. Her piety and benevolence; her charity; her prudence, patience, and wisdom, would have been, if it had pleased God to spare her life, an admirable model for you to copy. But...