You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Adams, John Quincy
  • Period

    • Confederation Period
    • Confederation Period
  • Correspondent

    • Adams, John Quincy

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 6

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Confederation Period" AND Period="Confederation Period" AND Correspondent="Adams, John Quincy"
Results 1-10 of 60 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
This evening as I was Setting, with only your sister by my side, who was scribling at the table to some of her correspondents, my Neighbour Feild enterd, with “I have a letter for you Madam”; my immagination was wandering to Paris, ruminating upon the long, long absence of my dear son, and his parent; that I was rather inattentive to what he said, untill he repeated; I have Letters for you...
Your Letters by Mr. Thaxter I received; and was not a little pleased with them; if you do not write with the precision of a Robertson, nor the Elegance of a Voltaire, it is evident you have profited by the perusal of them. The account of your northern journey and your observation upon the Russian Goverment; would do credit to an older pen. The early age at which you went abroad; gave you not...
As I did not write you by the last conveyance I will not omit the present. I supposed your sister had got a Letter for You, but I found afterwards that she did not send it, because she could not please herself. This Week I received your trunk which Mr. Dana brought with him. You cannot conceive the pleasure I took in looking it over. The Books it is true were in a language that I understand...
I have been much dissapointed in not receiving any Letters from your Father or you by the late arrivals from England. Capt. Lyde, and a Brig have come in very short passages, but not a single Letter. This is very painfull as well as unfortunate for me just at this period. I thought it not prudent to take passage for Europe untill I heard from your Pappa. If I had received letters I should have...
At Amsterdam I received your Letter of the 18 and to day that of the 20th. Write me, when you Ship the Books for Rotterdam, and by what Captain what Vessell and to whom addressed. Your principal Attention Should be to Parliament, and the Bar at present. Your Stay will be short and you will not probably have another Opportunity of being much in London, for upon your Return I shall keep you very...
There is no Accomplishment, more usefull or reputable, or which conduces more to the Happiness of Life, to a Man of Business or of Leisure, than the Art of writing Letters. Symplicity, Ease, Familiarity and Perspicuity, comprehend all the necessary Rules. But these are not acquired without Attention and Study. The Habit you now form will go with you through Life. Spare no Pains then to begin...
Last night I received yours of the 1. with the Letter from your Mother to you, by which it appears so uncertain when She will arrive or embark, that if you can persuade Mr. Smith to come over here with the Ladies when they arrive, I would not have you wait for them. Make a Visit to Mr. Whitefoord, and ask the favour of him in my name to procure you a Place in the Gallery of the House of...
A young Gentleman of 17, must not talk of low Spirits for Small disappointments. He must reconcile his Mind to them. He will meet with many. My Friend Dr. Warren often told me, I was the most uniformly lucky Man, he ever knew, and indeed I must acknowledge, I have been often fortunate, both before and Since his Compliment. Notwithstanding which my Life has been a Series of dissappointments,...
I received your Letter of the 15th. on the 18th. and that of the 18th. this moment, and am happy to find that you Spend So much Time and take so much Pleasure in Chancery and Parliament. Present to Mr. Vaughan and Mr. Whiteford, my Thanks for their Politeness to you. I want to know if the Books are on their Way. You Should tell me Something of them in every Letter untill they are gone off, by...
I have the Pleasure of yours of July 30. and advise you to purchase the Coach and prepare every Thing to set off with me to Dover in a Week from this Day. I will not loose a Moment, of the agreable Company, that I can avoid. Indeed I have repented 20 times that I did not go with you. The Pas of Calais and the Pas of Harwich will make me sick, but do me no harm. Purchase Johnsons Lives of the...