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  • Author

    • Johnson, Louisa Catherine
  • Recipient

    • Adams, John Quincy
  • Period

    • Washington Presidency
  • Correspondent

    • Adams, John Quincy

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Documents filtered by: Author="Johnson, Louisa Catherine" AND Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Adams, John Quincy"
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So totally incapacitated do I feel myself for writing were it not through fear of giving you pain I certainly shou’d indulge my avowed aversion to it and decline the task but judging of your feelings by my own think it incumbent on me to avail myself of every opportunity of testifying my affectionate esteem for you I yesterday received yours of the 17 instant in which you desire my opinion of...
How shall I express my impatient anxiety at not hearing from you, five tedious weeks have elapsed without a line to say you are well or that I still retain a place in your remembrance— I learn continually the arrival of the Mails, consiquently am alarmed at your silence— Absence I have often heard is dangerous, were I to judge solely from my own feelings I should say that little was to be...
Permit me to felicitate you on your appointment to the Court of Lisbon which pleasing intelligence I received since my last was written I learn from our friend M r: Hall that it is probable you will return I think I need not tell you how much it will contribute to my happiness to see you yet should you not wish me to accompany you I must entreat you will take another route though I confess I...
Sunday last brought to hand your invaluable letter of the 6 th shall I confess I was nearly too much elated to know what I read having vainly flattered myself from the intelligence I previously received of your immediate return but alas how delusive is hope how was I disappointed to find you might not return till the Spring. You ask my permission to come here Oh my best friend you already know...
How shall I answer my dear friends last charming letter where find words adequate to the pleasure I experienced at reading it the idea of your returning almost compensates for the pain I felt at parting— Yet shall I confess fears arise which never presented themselves before. When I reflect upon the part in life I shall have to act with the little I have seen of the world my conscious...
After waiting with extreme anxiety I recieved my friend your very short letter of the 12 th Ins t which afforded me both pleasure and pain: it has realized an apprehension I had lately entertained, I knew not why of your having erroneously supposed me dazzled with what you stile rank. Permit to say that having always been taught to consider domestic happiness alone permanent I am and sincerely...
How my much loved friend Shall I atone. for the uneasiness my last letter caused you— Could my picture at the moment I read those lines so descriptive of your affectionate pain have proved a true index of my soul it would I am persuaded in your gentle bosom have procured my peace— Allow me to say I saw in yours, or thought I saw an inexpressible something that did not do justice to the...
I have within the last sad hour recieved your affectionate though painful letter of the 12 which caused me more uneasiness than I am capable of expressing; indeed I know not how I shall answer it— Ah my beloved friend how shall I acquire fortitude to bear my present disappointment— You have it is true kindly endeavoured to heal the wound so reluctantly given, but in vain each endearing line...
In my last I told you I believe how inadequate I found myself to the task of answering your very painful letter of the 12 th — Indeed my beloved friend my heart had at that moment recieved so deep a wound I scarce know how I acquired resolution sufficient to acknowledge it— Days are elapsed and I have in vain implored the friendly aid of reason, but she like the world in the hour of trial is...
Agreable to my promise of the 29 th of writing to my beloved friend once a week I now contrary to etiquette enter upon the pleasant occupation— Surely you will acknowledge—when I tell you you are indebted to me four letters I have amply compensated for my former omission— I have vainly expected to hear from you but the winds are unfavorable in a word every thing seems to conspire— I will only...