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Two vessels are notified, one for England, the other for Hamburgh. I will write by both, but the pleasure and freedom of communication, is much damp’d by the restraints of Station, and the apprehension of Capture. It is now several Months since I took my pen to address you. I believe my last date was in December. I have since written largly to Thomas, but fear my Letter is still waiting a...
Yes, my friend you have answered me as I deserve, and made me feel the striking difference between us, from the moment I had dispatched that letter, I regretted my folly, and felt sincerely ashamed of my ridiculous conduct— Dictated by anger, without time for reflection, I scarcely know what I wrote— you appeared to think I had not acted with delicacy, and my pride was wounded at the manner in...
General Pinckney and his family have arrived at Amsterdam; but as I have not seen him I presume he did not pass through this place. On the other hand Mr: Monroe has arrived in Paris, upon his return from his tour through this Country.—What was the cause of Mr. Pinckney’s being ordered to leave France is yet unknown.—But the conduct of the french Government and its dependents, at the same time...
I hope we shall never get into a habit of writing to one another angry and kind Letters alternately, for it would be far from promoting the happiness of either. Your obliging favour of the 7 th: inst t: came to me yesterday. It gave me great pleasure which I will not mingle, with other sentiments by dwelling upon a topic necessarily disagreeable.— I wish it were in my power to write you always...
I have recieved your letters of Jan ry. 28. and 31. which have afforded me more real satisfaction, than I have latterly been accustomed to experience— I think, I have at length discovered the meaning, of those very disagreeable expressions suspicion , and distrust , and can assure my best friend, if he alludes to what I said, respecting the circumstance that happened in our family, from the...
Since I wrote you last I have been in constant expectation of seeing General Pinckney here, and in hopes that from conversation with him, I might have some new circumstances of interesting information to communicate to you. My letters from Paris mention that he was to leave that place on the 2d: of this month.—Some accident must have delayed him as he has not yet reached this place. As soon as...
I was reflecting this morning, with what peculiar force and propriety, I could make the application of these tender and affectionate lines of Hammond, and how much more truly they were suited to the object of my constant love than to the person for whom they were originally destined, when your Letter of the 31 st: of last month was brought me. … It put an end at once to the delicious...
Since I had the honour of writing you I have been informed that about a year ago a workman in the sword manufactories at Sohlingen , a hilt founder by the name of Alte, was induced in consequence of the unsettled and distressed situation of that part of Germany to go to America and before he went had the Sword made according to his own fancy, with the intention as I understand of presenting it...
Though not many days have elapsed since I wrote you last, and I scarcely know what I can write for your amusement, I cannot omit the acknowledgment of having recently received your kind Letter, dated November. 11. which besides the pleasure which your Letters always afford, had the additional merit of relieving me from great anxiety on account of your health. The address of the President...
Your Letter of the 20 th: of last month, which I received a few days ago has taken from my bosom one of its heaviest weights. The imputation of unkindness to you, was one of those which it was least able to bear with fortitude, and to be relieved from which would alone have been equivalent to the most delicious gratification. Besides which it is full of the tenderness which I love and the...
Since I wrote you last I am informed that the French Directory have ordered Mr. Pinckney to leave France, and as he has determined to come into this Country, and wait here for the orders of the Government I expect to see him, from day to day—At the time when the refusal to receive him took place an intimation was given him that it was expected he would depart, but he refused to go without a...
A few days ago, I received at once your Letters of Novr: 11. from Quincy and of Decr: 5. from Philadelphia. In the course of three or four days indeed, I had a flood of American Letters pouring upon me, and can no longer complain of that inattention and neglect which an interval of three or four months had occasioned me to mention in my last Letter. Very soon after you wrote, the Elections of...
The day after I wrote you my last Letter, which was on the 28 th: I received your Letter of the 17 th: — It has given me as much pain as you expected, and more than I hope you intended. It has never been my intention to speak in an “authoritative,” a “commanding,” an “unkind” a “harsh” or a “peremptory” stile to you, and it distresses me to find that you think my letter of Dec r: 20. deserving...
Yes, my beloved friend, my spirit is roused , and I am determined to bear with fortitude what it is vain to lament— E’re this, you will have recieved my letter in answer to yours of December the 20, in which I have explained my sentiments as clearly as possible, it probably has displeased you, but remember my situation admits not of hesitation, or affectation , and though while I wrote it I...
I am to thank you for your obliging favour of the 30 th: of last month, which I received a few days ago.— I have given due attention to your observations contained in it.— If the approbation of my Countrymen were the only motive which I felt myself obliged to compare in the sacrifice of domestic happiness which I find myself obliged to make, I should not hesitate a moment in taking a different...
Almost immediately after I had dispatched my last, I recieved yours of 31 st December, and was delighted to see that you were again become the tender and affectionate friend I had always found you. All the family but me recieve letters from Boston, and Tom excuses himself by saying, it is generally supposed I am married and have accompanied you to Lisbon. he desires Mama to send him my...
A few days ago, I received a Letter from my father dated at Quincy the 28 th: of October, and brought by a vessel directly from Boston. But there came with it, none from you either to my brother or to me, and my father does not mention the state of your health, so that we are much concerned about it, particularly as a Letter from M r: Cranch at Washington, written in September mentions by...
I have recieved your very decisive letter of 20 th December, which has astonished and mortified me so much, that I can scarcely believe you recollected to whom you were writing— You seem to complain of a want of confidence on my part, and tell me it is what you have repeatedly solicited and what you again think it necessary to recommend— Surely you cannot imagine the authoritative stile of...
I received yesterday your favour of October 23 and it is by several weeks the latest Letter that I have from America.—It tells me that the Elections were going on with as little bitterness as could be expected, and this in the present circumstances is grateful intelligence. But all my American correspondents public and private as they appear to care nothing about the affairs of Europe, seem...
How painful it is to me, my amiable friend to feel the assurance that my Letters for which you wait with so much anxious expectation, when they arrive, can bring to you none but unacceptable news, and that they can relieve you from suspense only by the confirmation of disappointment. My Letters of November 19. December 5. 13. 20. and 31. are most probably before this time all in your hands....
In my last I mentioned having recieved yours of the 13 December, which time our general regulator opposed my answering— Shall I my best friend acknowledge the confession you there make, affords me no small satisfaction. I know not if it is the result of vanity, but am pleased to find a mind energetic as yours, own the theory of fortitude to be easier than the practice— I have frequently...
I received some time since your favour of Nov r: 29. and this morning that of Dec r: 16. You mentioned in the former your intention to take measures if possible which might secure my wishes, but that you could not fix upon them without first receiving Letters from your partners in America.— Not having it in my power to conjecture what you contemplated, I had hitherto postponed an answer until...
Since my Letter of the 20 th: I have not enjoyed the pleasure of receiving any from my friend, but I do not forget the mutual engagement of writing every week, and I cannot close the year in a better or more agreeable manner than in conversing with her— There are some particulars in your Letters of Nov r: 29. and Dec r: 6. which require a reply from me, which time did not allow me to give in...
I have recieved your letters which afforded me infinite pleasure as they assured me you were well and in good spirits— You tell me you are to remain at the Hague, and that you hope a greater distance, and longer time of seperation than we had contemplated, will have no effect upon my affection— I am almost angry when I read that part of your letter, as it implies a sort of doubt which I am...
The enclosed extract of a Letter from Paris, which has been communicated to me, contains certain paragraphs from the Rédacteur a newspaper used by the French Directory for their official and non-official publications. It explicitly denies as you will observe that the Directory have determined to suspend their intercourse with the Government of the United States. It is among those paragraphs...
It is a long time since I have had the pleasure to receive any letter from you. I suppose you spend so much time in dandling your offspring that you have none left to think of Collaterals. But what makes me most impatient is that you do not send us even the Newspapers until they are six months old. Here have arrived since the beginning of the Summer twenty or thirty vessels from New York...
The french Directory have refused to receive Mr: Pinckney as Minister from the United States, and have taken a resolution, that all communication between them and the American Government shall be suspended untill the wrongs of which the French Republic has a right to complain, shall be repaired. The motives alledged for this proceeding are said to be that the Treaty between the United States...
I have this morning received your two Letters of Nov r: 29. and December 6. The pain which the prospect of an inevitable continuance to our separation has given you I readily believe, and I know too well from my own experience its force. At the same time I rejoyce in finding that you have the fortitude to support it; you have seldom as you say been taught in the school of disappointment: your...
In my last Letter I purposed giving you an account of the measures which have been taken upon the Constitution produced after seven months labour by the Committee appointed to draw it up. But after mentioning the frowns which had been cast upon it while yet in embryo, by the citizen Noël, it would be perhaps superfluous now to relate how soon after its birth it has been overlaid.—The principal...
I received at Amsterdam on the 5th instt the Letter which you did me the honour to write me on the 12th of September, and immediately made enquiries to ascertain whether there was at Amsterdam a person by the name of Sollingen. I could trace no such person, but am informed that Sollingen near Dusseldorf in Germany is a place where there are noted manufactures of arms and sword-cutlery. I have...
Agreable to my promise of the 29 th of writing to my beloved friend once a week I now contrary to etiquette enter upon the pleasant occupation— Surely you will acknowledge—when I tell you you are indebted to me four letters I have amply compensated for my former omission— I have vainly expected to hear from you but the winds are unfavorable in a word every thing seems to conspire— I will only...
As I came through New York, where I found your Sister and your Brother and their families in good health I rec d your Letter N o. 24. and upon my arrival here, presented it to The President together with the preceeding Numbers to 19 inclusively. I dined with him on Saturday when he returned me the Letters, with an Eulogium. He Said that “Things appeared to him exactly as they do to your son”...
I have just now received, my dearest friend, your letter of the 15 th: of last month, since which I hope you have before now received two from me; and would to Heaven, they could have been such as would have been more conformable to our mutual inclinations, or that I could now give you tidings more agreeable for me to communicate or for you to receive.— Instead of which a Letter from America,...
In my last I told you I believe how inadequate I found myself to the task of answering your very painful letter of the 12 th — Indeed my beloved friend my heart had at that moment recieved so deep a wound I scarce know how I acquired resolution sufficient to acknowledge it— Days are elapsed and I have in vain implored the friendly aid of reason, but she like the world in the hour of trial is...
William Shaw came from Boston last Evening to keep Sabbeth with me and brought me your Letter of August 16. 1796 which came by way of N York, and one for your Father of 13 th . he Sat out for Philadelphia on the 23 of this Month. I forwarded it to him this morning. it was the Duplicate which first came to hand, and tho it almost put out my Eyes to read it, I did, and made a coppy of it before...
I have within the last sad hour recieved your affectionate though painful letter of the 12 which caused me more uneasiness than I am capable of expressing; indeed I know not how I shall answer it— Ah my beloved friend how shall I acquire fortitude to bear my present disappointment— You have it is true kindly endeavoured to heal the wound so reluctantly given, but in vain each endearing line...
I received yesterday your favour of August 7. The first time I have had the pleasure of a letter from you since the same date. I have also to acknowledge an unusual interval since my last to you was written. I shall not plead in excuse that a very considerable American correspondence, which I find myself obliged to furnish altogether on my part, with few returns of any kind, and those few...
The day after I had sent away my last Letter, I received yours of the 1 st: inst t: which relieved me from an anxious apprehension that you were unwell, or indisposed. The picture resumes whatever it can express of that mild and gentle disposition which is one of the greatest ornaments of the original, and which in my eyes is of more worth than graces or beauty, riches or honours. You will...
I received a few days ago, your favour of August 10 th. it mentions a previous letter of July 11 th. which has not yet reached me. The latest date from you before this last is of June 10. From my father I think I have none since May.— The appointment to the mission of Portugal, I find from your Letter was as I had before concluded, unknown to my father. I have already written you upon the...
I received by the last Post, two Letters from your Pappa, my amiable friend, and looked in vain for a line from you. Not a syllable even to tell me you were well. I found indeed from your Pappa’s Letters that you had not at their date received my last, and therefore upon the rigour of etiquette, you were not obliged to write. I shall not complain, and attribute your silence rather to your...
I have to acknowledg the receipt of two kind Letters from You Since I wrote You last, No 21 from the Hague June 30. and No 22 July 25. for both of them accept my Cordial Thanks. Letters from either of my sons, give me a flow of spirits for a week, and a Durable gratification in the perusal of them, as they contain judicious reflections and observations which would do honour to the most...
I know not where to find you—Whether in Holland England or Portugal—Whether to address you as a married Man or a Single one. And I am equally at a Loss what to write to you. one thing I am at no loss to say that your Letters have continued up to N o. 23. inclusively to delight and inform me, and that I beg you not to be discouraged from continuing your favours, by my Remissness in Writing Our...
How my much loved friend Shall I atone. for the uneasiness my last letter caused you— Could my picture at the moment I read those lines so descriptive of your affectionate pain have proved a true index of my soul it would I am persuaded in your gentle bosom have procured my peace— Allow me to say I saw in yours, or thought I saw an inexpressible something that did not do justice to the...
I have this Morning, filed in order your Letters and have now in one bundle before me from N o. 6 to N o. 23 inclusively and will take care they shall not be again Seperated. The Western Posts are all delivered, and the Commissions in a good Way.— M r King and M r Gore in England and I hope M r Pinkney in France, will be your Friends bothe Personally and Politically. You are destined to...
I have received your letter of September 7 th: with the account current, which as you observe, though not altogethe mercantile in point of form is fully intelligible and satisfactory. As I shall as soon as it is in my power authorise you to make another draught on my account, I shall remind you of two directions contained in my former letters and from which it is my wish that you will in no...
After reading your letter of the 30 th: of last month which I received this morning, I looked at your picture, and methought it looked unusually cool. — I read the letter a second time, and upon again turning to the picture, it seemed to look severe — Upon a third reading, I dared not again consult the portrait; I feared to find it disdainful — Between us two, my lovely friend let there be...
Your favor of the 13 th came to hand on the 26 th. by which I find that you had not determined on the time of your departure or the Rout you should persue, tho you say you should prefer that by way of England if you are permitted & a Passage in a Neutral Vessell could be obtaind to carry you to your destination; I donot know the propriutory or Impropiutory of your comeing this way, therefore I...
After waiting with extreme anxiety I recieved my friend your very short letter of the 12 th Ins t which afforded me both pleasure and pain: it has realized an apprehension I had lately entertained, I knew not why of your having erroneously supposed me dazzled with what you stile rank. Permit to say that having always been taught to consider domestic happiness alone permanent I am and sincerely...
The want of opportunity, and leisure, has a long time prevented me from writing you. The ship Mary Peggy, from Georgetown for Amsterdam has moved down & now lies in the stream opposite my house, waiting for the wind & tide. I have tried for a fortnight past to get a moment’s leisure to write you, but Mess rs. Morris & Nicholson are now here and their business together with the settlement &...
I have received, my amiable friend, your letters of the 19 th: and 28 th: of last month, and am properly grateful for the readiness with which you consent to accompany my rambling destinies. The sacrifice which you will be obliged to make in quitting your paternal roof, is so great, that it gives me not a little anxiety. To give you a substitute for it, I cannot expect. That you should ever...