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Mr: Robert Bird, the bearer of this letter, is a respectable merchant of this place, a brother of the Gentleman with whom you had the pleasure of an acquaintance some years since, at New-York. He proposes making a tour in the United States, during the ensuing Season, and I am happy to have this opportunity of introducing him to your acquaintance, and recommending him to your attentions. I am,...
I have entered upon my business, and have many things to say to you, but find myself at present, pressed for want of time. The newspapers to this date are enclosed. By the next opportunity I hope to write you largely, and I wish it may then be in my power to give you an opinion more favourable, of the dispositions entertained here towards the United States than my present expectations will...
The Hague, February 2, 1795. Discusses the political situation and the money market in Europe. LC , Adams Family Papers, deposited in the Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. This letter is incorrectly addressed to H as Secretary of the Treasury. He had resigned from that position on January 31, 1795, and was succeeded by Oliver Wolcott, Jr. See H to George Washington, January 31, 1795 ,...
I have a few papers to send you, and cannot omit the occasion to say a few words, though I have but very few to say. Our own affairs are at a stand. Mr: Pinckney will be here in the course of this week, and I have not chosen to do any thing conclusive before his return.—I believe there are people here, who like Publicola much better than they think of its reputed author. You have long known,...
The bearer of this Letter Mr: Montfort is a clergyman who being compelled to leave his Country, has for some time past found a refuge in this; but is at present obliged also to retire from hence. He has some expectation of going to America; and being unacquainted with the Language and altogether unknown there, he has requested some Letter that should bear testimony in his behalf. Without...
The bearer of this Letter, Mr. D’Hauteval, is a french Gentleman from the Island of St. Domingo, where he had lately the misfortune to lose a plantation of great value, by the devastation of the insurgent negroes. He has been about two months in this town, where I have frequently had the pleasure of meeting him in Company, and where his amiable manners have entitled him to as much esteem, ás...
Since my last Letter (15.) nothing very material has occurred. The newspapers enclosed will shew you the degree of opposition that is made against the Convention bills as they are called. The City of London has instructed its members to vote against them. They will however pass. I know not whether you have seen the review of the new Edition of your book, and therefore send the monthly Review...
Mr: Pinckney has returned, and of course my business here ceases. I am yet waiting however for orders enabling me to return to the Hague. I expect them with a little impatience, having many reasons to wish myself away from hence. The newspapers sent herewith contain intelligence of two important Events. The armistice concluded between the french and Austrian armies on the Rhine; and the return...
In addition to the letters and Packets which I have already sent by the present conveyance, I now enclose the newspapers up to this day. This contains intelligence of very considerable importance, which proves that the king of Sardinia has been compelled to enter into negotiations for Peace with the French Republic, and to surrender two strong fortresses as a preliminary to obtain a suspension...
Mr. Vall-travers informs me that he intends going to London, where he purposes paying his respects to you. I have therefore requested him to take charge of a packet for the Secretary of State, which I have taken the Liberty of enclosing to your care, according to the permission, you were pleased to give me on the day of my departure from London. The opportunities of sending to America from...
I wrote you so copiously, a few days since, that I can embrace the present opportunity only to offer the tribute of my duty and affection on the commencement of the new year, and to enclose a few papers and a review which may perhaps afford an hour of amusement. No news of importance has transpired since the date of my last Letter. The communication between the Continent and this island is at...
Mr: Ebenezer Dorr, and Mr: Edward Jones, merchants, of this Town, by this Post send a petition to Congress for leave, to send a small vessel in ballast to some port in Europe. It is a matter of great importance to them, that they should obtain their request. Mr: Dorr has bills of exchange drawn in France in his favour upon some person here, and they are protested. It becomes therefore of the...
The bearer of this letter, is Mr: Henry Rigal, who has been recommended to me as a gentleman of great respectability; he has heretofore held an office in the Service of the Elector of Bavaria, but from the present unsettled state of his Country, and a predilection in favour of America, he has determined to remove with his family and settle in some part of the United States, to whom I am well...
The enclosed Letter, accompanied a packet which I intended to have sent by M r : Vall-travers; but having since immediate opportunities to America from hence I shall not trouble you with my dispatches at present. It is here said that on the meeting of Parliament the King of Great Britain is to mention in the speech from the throne the signature of a Convention for the settlement of the...
You will doubtless hear before this reaches you, the event of a Town-meeting which was called here lately for the purpose of helping forward M r: Madison’s resolutions, and of intimidating our respresentatives who opposed them. After great [exertion] had been made to raise a Committee ready for every thing, [and the?] Committee had reported a number of resolves to answer [their purpo]ses, a...
After almost four months of expectation, I have at length received a letter which permits my return to the Hague, which I shall accordingly do by the first direct opportunity which may occur. The communication between the two Countries is interrupted, but there are frequent occasions of crossing, at this Season, by neutral vessels. I have written you several lengthy letters within these few...
On my return here at the close of the last week from Amsterdam I received your favour of the 24 th : ultim o : and request you to accept my thanks for the communications it contains. By public report I had already heard not only that the Treaty was signed, but the pretended purport of many articles of its contents. I had already felt myself obliged ^to leave^ ardent, and in some instances...
The bearer, Major-General Eustace, after having served with great honor and reputation in the Armies of France, retired from that service on receiving the Presidents Proclamation, declaring the Neutrality of the United States, & is now upon his return to America. It is with great pleasure that I introduce to your acquaintance, and recommend to your attentions a Gentleman of so much merit, and...
I arrived here last Evening, and this morning paid my Respects to the Secretary of State, who introduced me to the President.— I find that it is their wish that I should be as expeditious in my departure as possible. I told the Secretary, that the state of my own affairs would render my return to Boston previous to my departure, extremely eligible to [my]self. He enquired whether it would be...
I believe I am in arrears with you, for two or three Letters, which is owing in some measure to my indolence, but in a greater degree to the stagnation of events worthy of communication— The purpose of my present Letter is to enquire of you respecting a warrant from the Treasury for some money, which it seems must be sent here to be signed by your father before it can be sent back for payment....
Col l: Hamilton arrived in Philadelphia, the night before you left it, but from the pressure of business more immediately urgent, was not prepared for me untill last Friday. On that Evening I left the City, in company with Gen l Knox, and arrived here (quite overcome with fatigue, and somewhat unwell of the complaint which you brought from the same place) on Saturday at about 6 in the Evening....
I have received, my amiable friend, your letters of the 19 th: and 28 th: of last month, and am properly grateful for the readiness with which you consent to accompany my rambling destinies. The sacrifice which you will be obliged to make in quitting your paternal roof, is so great, that it gives me not a little anxiety. To give you a substitute for it, I cannot expect. That you should ever...
M r: Clagett has this moment delivered me your favour of the 29 th: ult o: and informs me that he goes again for Holland to-morrow morning. I have therefore only time to tell you that I am still waiting for that permission to return which I have been more than two months in hourly expectation of receiving. My detention here is doubly mortifying from the consideration that as my presence is...
I am to thank you for your obliging favour of the 30 th: of last month, which I received a few days ago.— I have given due attention to your observations contained in it.— If the approbation of my Countrymen were the only motive which I felt myself obliged to compare in the sacrifice of domestic happiness which I find myself obliged to make, I should not hesitate a moment in taking a different...
Since I had the honour of writing you I have been informed that about a year ago a workman in the sword manufactories at Sohlingen , a hilt founder by the name of Alte, was induced in consequence of the unsettled and distressed situation of that part of Germany to go to America and before he went had the Sword made according to his own fancy, with the intention as I understand of presenting it...
I received at Amsterdam on the 5th instt the Letter which you did me the honour to write me on the 12th of September, and immediately made enquiries to ascertain whether there was at Amsterdam a person by the name of Sollingen. I could trace no such person, but am informed that Sollingen near Dusseldorf in Germany is a place where there are noted manufactures of arms and sword-cutlery. I have...
I have just received your favor of the 9th inst. with the inclosures, and agreeable to your directions, herewith return the former power cancelled, and the previous Schedule marked E. The word “your” instead of “his” sufficient Warrant, used at the close of the present, as well as the former power, is I presume not sufficiently material to need an alteration. I have the honor to be with the...
I received a few days since your favour of the 10 th: inst t. and as there will be a difficulty in procuring a tenant for the house, I should wish if possible to take some other office at least for a time. The multiplicity of your affairs almost precludes the hope that you can attend to this matter: if however you should hear of any room conveniently situated which might be hired for a...
Your father will be the bearer of this Letter, and probably will find you at Philadelphia, which our late accounts represent as being totally free from the pestilence, which raged with so much violence for two or three months.— Remember however and be cautious— In the midst of the general calamity, for which your friends participate in the general affliction, they recollect with pleasure,...
About three months have elapsed since I received information by Letters from America, of the distressing trial you were called to endure, and the heavy affliction you sustained so soon after my departure from my native land. The intelligence affected me sensibly not only from the disposition to sympathize with your sorrows, but because I felt the loss myself of a friend, whose affections were...
The stage in which I had engaged a passage for Philadelphia this morning, has gone away by mistake, and left me behind, which gives me leisure to write a line by my brother. He intends to pay you a visit this summer, and will be the bearer of this. I was detained three days in Newport for a wind, but otherwise have had a very comfortable passage from Boston hither— I find my health better than...
About a month after I last took my leave of you in New York, I sailed from Boston, and after a passage of twenty eight days landed at Deal in England. We spent a fortnight in London, where we saw several of your friends who enquired particularly after you: and have now been about three weeks in this Country, principally at the Hague. It is at a very critical and dangerous period for this...
I received yesterday your very laconic favour enclosing a draft upon the bank for 500 dollars which I shall pay over according to your directions. We are in great apprehension of being forced into a War. The last intelligence we have from the West Indies is that they capture and condemn all our vessels without discrimination— A Man arrived yesterday with an account of more than thirty sail...
I wrote to my brother Thomas more than a fortnight ago, respecting the warrant, & requesting him to see it forwarded— But whether from an apprehension on his part of an additional delay, or from what other cause I know not, he has not done it, and last Evening in answer to my Letter I received from him one urging very strongly the necessity of his having an order to receive the money.— Two...
M r: Newcomb has executed a power of Attorney, authorising you to receive his interest due. I herewith enclose it.— You mention in your Letter to your mother, that you expect to leave Philadelphia the 28 th: of this month. But not where you purpose to go. I should be glad to hear from you once in a while. I think you are now in my debt upon the score of our correspondence. War—seems to be now...
I believe there have been two or three opportunities of writing to the Hague since I received your favour of the 23 d: ult o: which have escaped me. This circumstance is not to be attributed entirely to indolence or inattention on my part: in fact I have been very unwell, and for the last three weeks have scarcely taken a pen in hand. My previous correspondence from hence I think will bear no...
Upon my leaving America, your Father gave me an order upon Mess rs W. & J Willink for five obligations on a Loan of the United States, for a thousand Guilders each, bearing an interest of five per cent. and upon which one years interest will be due, on the first of June next, which he directed me to hold in trust for your use, and subject to your orders. This instruction has been complied with...
At length I have been released from a situation, equally remote from all public utility and all personal satisfaction. After a detention which I could not avoid, but which was at least unnecessary, of several months I left London on the 28th: of last month, and arrived here on the 31st: The People there were in the midst of the Saturnalian electioneering holidays. The writs issued for the New...
A variety of circumstances have occurred since you left this part of the Country, which have combined to change in some measure the state of our parties in this State; you have probably heard of them from other Quarters, and ought to have heard of them before this from me. I will endeavour however to retrieve as far as possibly my former deficiency, and to give you an account of the present...
I have received within a few days three Letters with which you have favoured me, and shall pay to their contents all the attention which I can command. The scheme which you have traced out in the last of them is so extensive, that I am apprehensive it will require much time, as well as very constant enquiries, to obtain the information of the several kinds which you mention. I shall endeavour...
Mr: Wilcox has not yet been here but sent me from Hamburg your favour of February 11. which was the first letter I have been happy enough to receive from you since we left America. When he comes here, I shall be happy to shew him every civility in my power. It is extremely pleasing to hear that the elections for the ensuing completion of the Senate have been so favourable. I believe the time...
The french Directory have refused to receive Mr: Pinckney as Minister from the United States, and have taken a resolution, that all communication between them and the American Government shall be suspended untill the wrongs of which the French Republic has a right to complain, shall be repaired. The motives alledged for this proceeding are said to be that the Treaty between the United States...
I expected to have been on my way to Boston before this; but M r: Hamilton is gone into the Country, and I cannot be supplied with my instructions untill he returns. He has been expected every hour these four days, and it is very possible that four days hence he may still be hourly expected. In the mean while I am here lolling away my time, and sweating away my person, with nothing to do, and...
In the situation which has already detained me here between four and five months, and from which I am waiting with anxiety not unmingled with impatience to be relieved, I have very few opportunities to obtain any intelligence of importance other than what is contained in the daily newspapers, one complete sett of which I have regularly forwarded to you by every opportunity that has been known...
I have a Letter from you which has called forth the few remaining sparks of my attenion to politics— Were my own mind at ease, I should at the present time enter more than ever into the spirit of speculation upon public affairs. The prospect is really glorious; but it is perhaps impossible, at least for a man whose patriotism is not tinctured with more heroism than mine, to consider the...
The enclosed extract of a Letter from Paris, which has been communicated to me, contains certain paragraphs from the Rédacteur a newspaper used by the French Directory for their official and non-official publications. It explicitly denies as you will observe that the Directory have determined to suspend their intercourse with the Government of the United States. It is among those paragraphs...
I have been detained about ten days in this place, waiting for a wind, and am very like to be detained as many more; the westerly winds prevailing in the channel at this Season of the year almost without intermission. Since my arrival here I have received your favour of August 25. transmitted to me by my Brother, who remains at the Hague, with the care of our affairs during my absence.—...
I received this morning your favour of the 3 d: inst t: We still hold tolerably firm to the text of neutrality; though we have our partialities for the french, and are much irritated against the british.— This is natural enough, and indeed, although we have some grounds of complaint against both with respect to their treatment of our commerce, in their present contest; yet it is not to be...
As I was going to meeting this afternoon a Gentleman met me in the street, and desired me to fill him a writ immediately which he intends to have served as early as possible in the morning. I accordingly did it, and as it is now too late to attend the afternoon service, I think I cannot employ the leisure time thus thrown on my hands better than in giving you an account of the commercial...
I received two days ago your letter from New-York of June 29. It gratified my highest ambition as it testifies the approbation of the President and the Secretaries, upon my conduct and correspondence, and my strongest affections as it informed me of the health of my dearest friends. At the same time I received a letter from my brother Charles, and papers, with accounts of popular movements in...