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After a detention of twenty days at Helvoetsluys, and a pleasant passage of twenty four hours from thence to Margate I arrived here on the morning of the 11th: instt: The state of the business on which I came, will be known to you before the receipt of this Letter. An English paper that I saw at Rotterdam on the day of my departure from the Hague gave me the first information of Mr: Randolph’s...
At length I have been released from a situation, equally remote from all public utility and all personal satisfaction. After a detention which I could not avoid, but which was at least unnecessary, of several months I left London on the 28th: of last month, and arrived here on the 31st: The People there were in the midst of the Saturnalian electioneering holidays. The writs issued for the New...
Your favour of January 23 d. by Captain Barnard reached me two or three days ago. I am a little surprized that you had not at that date received any letters from me later than July. But indeed the intercourse between America and Holland is so precarious and interrupted that it is scarcely possible that a letter should pass from the one to the other in a shorter time than four or five months....
I believe I am in arrears with you, for two or three Letters, which is owing in some measure to my indolence, but in a greater degree to the stagnation of events worthy of communication— The purpose of my present Letter is to enquire of you respecting a warrant from the Treasury for some money, which it seems must be sent here to be signed by your father before it can be sent back for payment....
The most recent intelligence we have from America is contained in your letter of June 30 & July 23. which arrived some days since, and gave me information unpleasant but not unexpected. I was convinced from a variety of reasons that all the engines of popular agitation would be played off against the ratification of the treaty signed by M r Jay, and I knew that some of its contents were such...
I received a few days ago your favour of Feb y: 29. which was doubly grateful to me, as it was the first letter I had received from America, for many weeks.— Since then I have also received a letter from Philadelphia, which determines my immediate return to the Hague, from whence I hope that the next letter I shall write you will be dated. You will find in the papers enclosed all the news that...
A variety of circumstances have occurred since you left this part of the Country, which have combined to change in some measure the state of our parties in this State; you have probably heard of them from other Quarters, and ought to have heard of them before this from me. I will endeavour however to retrieve as far as possibly my former deficiency, and to give you an account of the present...
I have received within a few days three Letters with which you have favoured me, and shall pay to their contents all the attention which I can command. The scheme which you have traced out in the last of them is so extensive, that I am apprehensive it will require much time, as well as very constant enquiries, to obtain the information of the several kinds which you mention. I shall endeavour...
I hope we shall never get into a habit of writing to one another angry and kind Letters alternately, for it would be far from promoting the happiness of either. Your obliging favour of the 7 th: inst t: came to me yesterday. It gave me great pleasure which I will not mingle, with other sentiments by dwelling upon a topic necessarily disagreeable.— I wish it were in my power to write you always...
Your Packet by M r: Clarke at length was delivered me on the 21 st: and your letter of the 11 th: of this month, by M r: Calhoun the day preceding. Quincy’s letter is indeed a valuable one, and contains some opinions which are at once just important, and not sufficiently established in the minds of Americans in general. I would enclose it back to you, but think I may as well be the bearer of...
Col l: Hamilton arrived in Philadelphia, the night before you left it, but from the pressure of business more immediately urgent, was not prepared for me untill last Friday. On that Evening I left the City, in company with Gen l Knox, and arrived here (quite overcome with fatigue, and somewhat unwell of the complaint which you brought from the same place) on Saturday at about 6 in the Evening....
I have received, my amiable friend, your letters of the 19 th: and 28 th: of last month, and am properly grateful for the readiness with which you consent to accompany my rambling destinies. The sacrifice which you will be obliged to make in quitting your paternal roof, is so great, that it gives me not a little anxiety. To give you a substitute for it, I cannot expect. That you should ever...
M r: Clagett has this moment delivered me your favour of the 29 th: ult o: and informs me that he goes again for Holland to-morrow morning. I have therefore only time to tell you that I am still waiting for that permission to return which I have been more than two months in hourly expectation of receiving. My detention here is doubly mortifying from the consideration that as my presence is...
Mr: Wilcox has not yet been here but sent me from Hamburg your favour of February 11. which was the first letter I have been happy enough to receive from you since we left America. When he comes here, I shall be happy to shew him every civility in my power. It is extremely pleasing to hear that the elections for the ensuing completion of the Senate have been so favourable. I believe the time...
A few days ago, I received a Letter from my father dated at Quincy the 28 th: of October, and brought by a vessel directly from Boston. But there came with it, none from you either to my brother or to me, and my father does not mention the state of your health, so that we are much concerned about it, particularly as a Letter from M r: Cranch at Washington, written in September mentions by...
The arrival of the french Army in this Country, as the friends and allies of the Batavian People, and the Revolution, which has abolished the Stadholdership, the nobility, the former States of the Provinces, and the Regencies of the Cities, will undoubtedly be a subject of considerable attention in our Country; perhaps it may give occasion to many groundless rumours and reports, and possibly...
The french Directory have refused to receive Mr: Pinckney as Minister from the United States, and have taken a resolution, that all communication between them and the American Government shall be suspended untill the wrongs of which the French Republic has a right to complain, shall be repaired. The motives alledged for this proceeding are said to be that the Treaty between the United States...
I expected to have been on my way to Boston before this; but M r: Hamilton is gone into the Country, and I cannot be supplied with my instructions untill he returns. He has been expected every hour these four days, and it is very possible that four days hence he may still be hourly expected. In the mean while I am here lolling away my time, and sweating away my person, with nothing to do, and...
The opportunities for writing occur so frequently at this time, and there is so little to say that I am apprehensive some of them will escape without carrying any letters to you; for one is ashamed to write a short letter; when it is to go so far; and like most correspondents I do not always remember that to write little is better than not to write at all. I send you by the present opportunity...
My last Letter acknowledged the receipt of your favour of February 11. That of December 2. has since reached me. By the same opportunity, I have Letters from my brother Charles of March 12. And I have seen Boston papers to the 1st of April. Our information from America, is yet generally indirect, and our means of conveyance few, difficult and uncertain. The appointment, which places me here is...
I am to thank you for your obliging favour of the 30 th: of last month, which I received a few days ago.— I have given due attention to your observations contained in it.— If the approbation of my Countrymen were the only motive which I felt myself obliged to compare in the sacrifice of domestic happiness which I find myself obliged to make, I should not hesitate a moment in taking a different...
In the situation which has already detained me here between four and five months, and from which I am waiting with anxiety not unmingled with impatience to be relieved, I have very few opportunities to obtain any intelligence of importance other than what is contained in the daily newspapers, one complete sett of which I have regularly forwarded to you by every opportunity that has been known...
I arrived at Gravesend on Saturday, barely in time to get on board the vessel in which I had engaged my passage, and which was already under weigh. After a voyage of three days, I landed at Rotterdam, and came on here immediately. In the boat from Rotterdam I met M r: Bourne, who was on his return from Paris, and who goes on this day to Amsterdam As I understand there is a vessel going to...
I have a Letter from you which has called forth the few remaining sparks of my attenion to politics— Were my own mind at ease, I should at the present time enter more than ever into the spirit of speculation upon public affairs. The prospect is really glorious; but it is perhaps impossible, at least for a man whose patriotism is not tinctured with more heroism than mine, to consider the...
The enclosed extract of a Letter from Paris, which has been communicated to me, contains certain paragraphs from the Rédacteur a newspaper used by the French Directory for their official and non-official publications. It explicitly denies as you will observe that the Directory have determined to suspend their intercourse with the Government of the United States. It is among those paragraphs...
I have this morning received your two Letters of Nov r: 29. and December 6. The pain which the prospect of an inevitable continuance to our separation has given you I readily believe, and I know too well from my own experience its force. At the same time I rejoyce in finding that you have the fortitude to support it; you have seldom as you say been taught in the school of disappointment: your...
I have been for more than three weeks indebted to you for two very agreeable Letters, which Mr. Otis brought from you. They would not have remained so long unanswered but for a variety of circumstances which have concurred to engross all my time during that period. It is possible that you may have observed in the Centinel about a month since, that a Committee of 21 inhabitants at this Town was...
Since I had the honour of writing you I have been informed that about a year ago a workman in the sword manufactories at Sohlingen , a hilt founder by the name of Alte, was induced in consequence of the unsettled and distressed situation of that part of Germany to go to America and before he went had the Sword made according to his own fancy, with the intention as I understand of presenting it...
I received your short Epistle by M r: Thomas at Ipswich, where I was then attending the Court of Common Pleas: and at the same time he gave me very agreeable information respecting your performance at exhibition; which has been confirmed to me from several quarters. From the conversations which have repeatedly passed between us, you will readily imagine how much I was gratified, to hear that...
I have been detained about ten days in this place, waiting for a wind, and am very like to be detained as many more; the westerly winds prevailing in the channel at this Season of the year almost without intermission. Since my arrival here I have received your favour of August 25. transmitted to me by my Brother, who remains at the Hague, with the care of our affairs during my absence.—...
After reading your letter of the 30 th: of last month which I received this morning, I looked at your picture, and methought it looked unusually cool. — I read the letter a second time, and upon again turning to the picture, it seemed to look severe — Upon a third reading, I dared not again consult the portrait; I feared to find it disdainful — Between us two, my lovely friend let there be...
I have received your Letter containing the orders upon the branch bank, and also that with the bill of lading of 3 barrels; I ought to have written you this information a post or two ago, but some business, more indolence, and most of all forgetfulness was the occasion of my omission. I suppose you will soon commence Attorney, and I understand you have some thoughts of retiring into one of the...
I have the receipt of two Letters from you to acknowledge; the one bearing date September 15. and the other October 8. of the year which has just been added to the rolls of departed Time. For both these Letters please to accept my cordial thanks. As the principal subject of them relates to the Treaty, which brought me here, they are not susceptible of a lengthy answer from me.— The part which...
We have been already ten days in this place, but there has been no opportunity to Boston since our arrival. And altho’ I have done but very little, yet I have been so perpetually busy, that I have scarce found time even to write to the Secretary of State, and to my Father. My Brother I presume has informed you, how pleasant our passage was in every respect, excepting the conveyance, & how very...
Phillips delivered me at Exeter a half sheet of paper from you, I trust I need not say it was very acceptable; I would only observe by the way, that I am no great friend to half-sheets. Sat verbum— We had a comfortable ordination. Phillips can give you any particulars that your curiosity may wish to be informed of. He was however by an unfortunate accident detained from the dance in the...
The letter from Charles enclosed in yours of yesterday, accompanies as he says the bills, which may therefore be expected immediately for acceptance. As they are at thirty days sight, it will perhaps be necessary to pay the money before the close of the year. The sum of f. 7,500. will just about absorb that for which I have a right to draw upon the bankers at Amsterdam, untill the last of...
I received at Amsterdam on the 5th instt the Letter which you did me the honour to write me on the 12th of September, and immediately made enquiries to ascertain whether there was at Amsterdam a person by the name of Sollingen. I could trace no such person, but am informed that Sollingen near Dusseldorf in Germany is a place where there are noted manufactures of arms and sword-cutlery. I have...
I returned here ten days ago from England and have this day received your letter of April 24. th: brought by M r: Rutgers. He is at Amsterdam, and when he comes this way it will give me much pleasure to see him. It gives me the most heartfelt satisfaction to be informed of the prosperous situation in which you are placed; of your present happiness, and future pleasing prospects, and you will...
I received this morning your favour of the 3 d: inst t: We still hold tolerably firm to the text of neutrality; though we have our partialities for the french, and are much irritated against the british.— This is natural enough, and indeed, although we have some grounds of complaint against both with respect to their treatment of our commerce, in their present contest; yet it is not to be...
I received yesterday your favour of October 23 and it is by several weeks the latest Letter that I have from America.—It tells me that the Elections were going on with as little bitterness as could be expected, and this in the present circumstances is grateful intelligence. But all my American correspondents public and private as they appear to care nothing about the affairs of Europe, seem...
I have a few papers to send you, and cannot omit the occasion to say a few words, though I have but very few to say. Our own affairs are at a stand. Mr: Pinckney will be here in the course of this week, and I have not chosen to do any thing conclusive before his return.—I believe there are people here, who like Publicola much better than they think of its reputed author. You have long known,...
The public affairs of the Country where I now reside, afford at this time but an indifferent topic of correspondence. In the general scale of Europe, it is of so little comparative importance, that nothing less than a conquest or a Revolution, can make its current events interesting enough to be an object of communication beyond the atlantic. Both these great political changes have taken place...
I have just received your favor of the 9th inst. with the inclosures, and agreeable to your directions, herewith return the former power cancelled, and the previous Schedule marked E. The word “your” instead of “his” sufficient Warrant, used at the close of the present, as well as the former power, is I presume not sufficiently material to need an alteration. I have the honor to be with the...
The day after I wrote you my last Letter, which was on the 28 th: I received your Letter of the 17 th: — It has given me as much pain as you expected, and more than I hope you intended. It has never been my intention to speak in an “authoritative,” a “commanding,” an “unkind” a “harsh” or a “peremptory” stile to you, and it distresses me to find that you think my letter of Dec r: 20. deserving...
The Bankers of the United States at Amsterdam, have written to you upon the present state of affairs in this Country, which would in their opinion render the negotiation for eight hundred thousand Dollars, for which they have been commissioned altogether impracticable, even if they had received from Coll. Humphreys the intimation for which they are instructed to wait. Under these circumstances...
Your Letter of September 3 d. advising your having drawn the preceding day, bills on me in favour of Daniel Ludlow & C o: for ƒ7,500. at thirty days sight, was received by our Brother Thomas at the Hague on the first of this month, and forwarded by him to me, at this place, where it reached me the next day. The bills though mentioned by you as accompanying the Letter, were not presented for...
Mr: Robert Bird, the bearer of this letter, is a respectable merchant of this place, a brother of the Gentleman with whom you had the pleasure of an acquaintance some years since, at New-York. He proposes making a tour in the United States, during the ensuing Season, and I am happy to have this opportunity of introducing him to your acquaintance, and recommending him to your attentions. I am,...
I have just received from my good friend Hall, a Letter of the 8 th: inst t: which is precious to me not only as it comes from him, but because it gives me the information that you were well. He delights in giving pleasure to his friends, and he knows very well how to do it; for his letter speaks of you, as you deserve, and that could not fail of giving the highest gratification to me. The...
I received with great pleasure, my dear Mamma, your favour of the 7 th: inst t: which relieved me in some measure from my anxiety on account of your health, though it is now again alarmed at having no letters this evening by the Post. I want exceedingly to hear of your arrival at Philadelphia, and of the thorough restoration of your health.— I hope nothing will induce you to spend another...
Since the date of my last Letter, (December 25: 1794.) a revolution has taken place, the substance of which had been for some time expected, but the forms of which have been infinitely milder, than had ever entered the imagination of any man. The french Army of the North, after a brilliant and successful campaign from March till December, had at length reached the banks of the Waal, and was...