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  • Author

    • Adams, John Quincy
  • Recipient

    • Johnson, Louisa Catherine
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    • Washington Presidency
  • Correspondent

    • Adams, John Quincy

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John Quincy" AND Recipient="Johnson, Louisa Catherine" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Adams, John Quincy"
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I have received, my amiable friend, your letters of the 19 th: and 28 th: of last month, and am properly grateful for the readiness with which you consent to accompany my rambling destinies. The sacrifice which you will be obliged to make in quitting your paternal roof, is so great, that it gives me not a little anxiety. To give you a substitute for it, I cannot expect. That you should ever...
I hope we shall never get into a habit of writing to one another angry and kind Letters alternately, for it would be far from promoting the happiness of either. Your obliging favour of the 7 th: inst t: came to me yesterday. It gave me great pleasure which I will not mingle, with other sentiments by dwelling upon a topic necessarily disagreeable.— I wish it were in my power to write you always...
I have this morning received your two Letters of Nov r: 29. and December 6. The pain which the prospect of an inevitable continuance to our separation has given you I readily believe, and I know too well from my own experience its force. At the same time I rejoyce in finding that you have the fortitude to support it; you have seldom as you say been taught in the school of disappointment: your...
After reading your letter of the 30 th: of last month which I received this morning, I looked at your picture, and methought it looked unusually cool. — I read the letter a second time, and upon again turning to the picture, it seemed to look severe — Upon a third reading, I dared not again consult the portrait; I feared to find it disdainful — Between us two, my lovely friend let there be...
The day after I wrote you my last Letter, which was on the 28 th: I received your Letter of the 17 th: — It has given me as much pain as you expected, and more than I hope you intended. It has never been my intention to speak in an “authoritative,” a “commanding,” an “unkind” a “harsh” or a “peremptory” stile to you, and it distresses me to find that you think my letter of Dec r: 20. deserving...
I have just received from my good friend Hall, a Letter of the 8 th: inst t: which is precious to me not only as it comes from him, but because it gives me the information that you were well. He delights in giving pleasure to his friends, and he knows very well how to do it; for his letter speaks of you, as you deserve, and that could not fail of giving the highest gratification to me. The...
I have just received your letter of the 28 th: of last month, and though I have not yet read it more than ten or fifteen times, I take the very first moment I have, to reply. I judge of your sentiments from my own, and conclude, that I shall run no risk of writing too often.— Perhaps in this I am mistaken. Perhaps with your aversion to writing , and the ILL-NATURE that the very thought of it...
Since my Letter of the 20 th: I have not enjoyed the pleasure of receiving any from my friend, but I do not forget the mutual engagement of writing every week, and I cannot close the year in a better or more agreeable manner than in conversing with her— There are some particulars in your Letters of Nov r: 29. and Dec r: 6. which require a reply from me, which time did not allow me to give in...
Your Letter of the 20 th: of last month, which I received a few days ago has taken from my bosom one of its heaviest weights. The imputation of unkindness to you, was one of those which it was least able to bear with fortitude, and to be relieved from which would alone have been equivalent to the most delicious gratification. Besides which it is full of the tenderness which I love and the...
How painful it is to me, my amiable friend to feel the assurance that my Letters for which you wait with so much anxious expectation, when they arrive, can bring to you none but unacceptable news, and that they can relieve you from suspense only by the confirmation of disappointment. My Letters of November 19. December 5. 13. 20. and 31. are most probably before this time all in your hands....