You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Adams, Abigail
  • Correspondent

    • Adams, Abigail

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail" AND Correspondent="Adams, Abigail"
Results 241-270 of 1,473 sorted by author
This is King Tammany’s Day. Tammany was an Indian King, of this Part of the Continent, when Mr. Penn first came here. His Court was in this Town. He was friendly to Mr. Penn and very serviceable to him. He lived here among the first settlers for some Time and untill old Age and at last was burnt. Some say he lived here with Mr. Penn when he first came here, and upon Mr. Pens Return he heard of...
Monsieur Chaumont has just informed me of a Vessell bound to Boston: but I am reduced to such a Moment of Time, that I can only inform you that I am well, and inclose a few Lines from Johnny, to let you know that he is so. I have ordered the Things you desired, to be sent you, but I will not yet say by what Conveyance, for fear of Accidents. If human Nature could be made happy by any Thing...
I thank you for presenting a Barrell of Flour to my Mother, and wish you to do every Thing for her Comfort, that lies in your Power. My Duty to her.— Ames is not here nor is any other Vessell bound to Boston. We shall send more Flour as soon as there is Opportunity. I am glad to hear that at length after 5 or 6 Years meditation you have made your Visit to M rs Miller and M rs Vezey. I am...
Mobs are the trite Topick of Declamation and Invective, among all the ministerial People, far and near. They are grown universally learned in the Nature, Tendency and Consequences of them, and very eloquent and pathetic in descanting upon them. They are Sources of all kinds of Evils, Vices, and Crimes, they say. They give Rise to Prophaneness, Intemperance, Thefts, Robberies, Murders, and...
Mr. Church setts off, tomorrow Morning. I have sent this Morning by Mr. William Winthrop, about half a dozen Letters containing Papers &c. Have nothing new to write. We have been very busily engaged for 4 or 5 days in procuring Assistance for Boston. Congress has at last voted three Additional Battallions for Boston and that the five old ones be filled up, and We shall send you a Major General...
After a March like that of Hannibal over the Alps We arrived last Night at this Place, Where We found the Utmost Difficulty to get Forage for our Horses, and Lodgings for ourselves, and at last were indebted to the Hospitality of a private Gentleman Coll. Brinkhoff Brinckerhoff , who very kindly cared for Us. We came from Hartford through Farmington, Southington, Waterbury, Woodbury, New...
I am lodged at M r Otis’s and am personally well accommodated: but I am So little pleased with living alone at any Lodgings, that this shall be the last time. You must come to me another Year or I will come to you. I am convinced if you were now here you would again be sick for the damp and chill is very penetrating. Next fall, I hope your health will be better. How the Election is gone I know...
I wrote you last Week and inclosed an order for 600. Let me know when you receive it. Although the Weather is the most beautiful I ever knew in December, the Time Seems longer to me, than ever any time did in America— The Business of Congress this session is Dulness Flatness and Insipidity itself. M r Cranch went off, on Fryday for Washington as he intended to go to Anapolis, I gave him a...
Your two Letters concerning Mr. T yler are never out of my Mind. He is of a very numerous Family and Connection in Boston who have long had great Influence in that Town and therefore if his Education has been regular to the Bar, as it must have been if he followed his Studies regularly, under two Such Masters as Mr. Dana and Mr. Angier, if he has been admitted and Sworn with the Consent and...
I think I have sometimes observed to you in Conversation, that upon examining the Biography of illustrious Men, you will generally find some Female about them in the Relation of Mother or Wife or Sister, to whose Instigation, a great Part of their Merit is to be ascribed. You will find a curious Example of this, in the Case of Aspasia, the Wife of Pericles. She was a Woman of the greatest...
We are lodged in our old Chamber at Amsterdam, and Sleep as soundly as if there were not a dozen houses plundered every night. The two nights before the last were very Seditious. last night was quiet, and the Precautions which Secured the Peace then, will be continued, so t[hat] all will be still.— dont be anxious for Us, nor believe half the Reports that will be circulated. Such Events are...
I rec d. Yesterday your kind favour of the 11 th. I have not been able lately to write you so much as I wished. The President has appointed M r Jay to go to England as Envoy Extraordinary, in hopes that Satisfaction may be obtained for the Injuries done us in the Capture of our Vessells. I have no very Sanguine hopes of his Success, but if any Man can Succeed I presume he is as likely as any....
I have sent you Things from Bilbao, by Captain Babson, and a small present by the M. de la Fayette, another by Mr. Lee, another by Mr. Wharton, and shall send another by Mr. Brown, another by Mr. Izard, and perhaps another by the Viscount de Noailles, and the Alliance will bring you and your Neighbours, what you and they wrote for. I intend to tax every Gentleman who goes from here, towards...
I had Yesterday the Pleasure of yours of January 5. I will Send, to M r Adams a Check upon the Branch Bank for two hundred Dollars as soon as I can get Thomas to transact the Business for me. I am glad to find that you have had Applications for the Farms— I wish you to hear them all and enquire their Characters and Circumstances We are all of Us here, very much concerned for Cheesman. he has...
I wish the new Year may be the happiest of your Life. Last Night I had a Visit from D r Rush, whose Tongue ran for an hour.— So many Compliments, so many old Anecdotes. To be Sure, My Election he Said, he had vast pleasure in assuring me Since it had been made certain had given vast Satisfaction in this City and State. Even those who had voted for another had a great Affection for me. M r...
Lee is at York, and We have requested a Battalion of Philadelphian Associators, together with a Regiment of Jersey Minute Men, to march to his Assistance. Lord Sterling was there before with his Regiment, so that there will be about 1000 Men with Lee from Connecticutt, about 600 with Ld. Sterling from the Jerseys, one Battalion of about 720 Minute Men from Jersey and one of the same No. from...
Yesterday I came to Senate as usual on a monday morning pleasing my Imagination and my heart with the hope and Expectation of a Letter from—my dearest Friend. No Letter for The Vice President Says Mathers! All Day in bad humour—dirty Weather—wet walking—nothing good—nothing right. The poor Post Offices did not escape—it was some blunder—some carlessness of theirs—in Philadelphia—New York or...
We have lived thro the Heat, and Toil, and Confusion of this Week. We have tried three of the Kennebeck Proprietors Actions and have been fortunate enough to obtain them all. Mr. Bowdoins great Case with Lord Edgcumbe, and Dr. Gardiners great Cause with William Tyng the sherriff of this County particularly. There are about 60 or 70 Actions now remaining on the Dockett, and When we shall get...
I received to day, together, your Favours of the 31 st December 1796 and 1. Jan. 1797 Our H. of R. boasts that We are the most enlightened People in the World: but We behave like the most ignorant Babies, in a thousand Instances. We have been destroying all Terror of Crimes and are becoming the Victims of them. We have been destroying all Attachment and Obligation to Country and are Sold in...
Yesterday by Major Osgood I had the Pleasure of a Letter from Mr. Palmer, in which he kindly informed me of your and the Familys Welfare. This is the first Intelligence I have had from Braintree since I left it—not a Line from you. Am sorry to learn that Braintree People are alarmed—hope they will not be attacked. Want to know the Particulars—how they have been threatned &c. Thomas is made a...
Since the Certainty has arrived of the very honourable Reelection of our Friend M r Smith of S. Carolina, the wiser Part of the Community have been the more anxious for that of M r Ames. The Orrery from Boston, which arrived Yesterday has excited great Expectations, that the District in which Boston is placed, will not disgrace itself by disgracing Sound Principles and independent Conduct in...
Yesterday I attended the Dedication of a Temple. The Presbyterian Congregation in Market Street, have taken down their old Meeting House, and erected a new one, in the Same Place, much larger higher, more light, airy and elegant. They assembled in it for the first time, Yesterday, when D r Ewing preached in the Morning and D r Blair in the Afternoon. I recollected with Pleasure upon this...
as soon as your Letter informed Us that M rs Brisler could not come without her husband I sent him off, in two hours, the day before Yesterday, i.e Monday. There has been Such a snow storm ever since that he must have had a bad Journey to N. York— Whether he will wait there for a Wind for Rhode Island or take the stage I know not but hope he will get home before you come away. This days Post...
I had a most charming Packett from you and my young Correspondents, to day. I am very happy, to learn that you have done such great Things in the Way of paying Debts. I know not what would become of me, and mine, if I had not such a Friend to take Care of my Interests in my Absence. You will have Patience with me this Time, I hope, for this Time will be the last. I shall stay out this Year, if...
I am much concerned least you should feel an Addition to your Anxieties, from your having so seldom heard from me. But I pray you to dismiss all Concern about me. I am happier far than I was before the Adjournment. My Health is better, and Business and Conversation are much more to my Taste. The surprizing Intelligence We have in private Letters concerning the Director of the Hospital, has...
I had no Letter from you Yesterday. As You intended to commence your Journey on the 24 th. it is not probable this Letter will meet you, till it returns to this Place. But as it is possible you might not be able to set out so soon, you may receive it at Quincy. Brisler is at Quincy before this, I hope. Charles is just gone, for N. York— I have communicated to him my Plan of sending my Coachman...
The enclosed Newspapers will communicate to you, all the News I know. The Weather here begins to be very hot. Poor Mortals pant and sweat, under the burning Skies. Faint and feeble as children, We seem as if We were dissolving away. Yet We live along. The two Armies are now playing off their Arts. Each acts with great Caution. Howe is as much afraid of putting any Thing to Hazard as...
This moment returning from Mr Bridgen where I had been to deliver him a Letter to you, written this Morning I found your very agreable favour of the 23. Am very glad you are so well Situated, So much pleased with your Journey, and present Accommodation. Dont be solicitous about me. I shall do very well—if I am cold in the night, and an additional quantity of Bed Cloaths will not answer the...
I arrived here, last Evening, and have attended Mr. Strongs Meeting all this Day. I rode alone, all the Way to this Place. Here I found my worthy Brothers Hancock and Adams. Cushing, We hear, spends this Day at Windham, and has sent us Word that he will join us here, tomorrow.—Mr. Paine is here too.—All well. We have good Accounts from N. York and N. Ca rolina —very good. I have no Doubts now...
General Lincoln setts out Tomorrow, and I should not dare to let him go without a Love Letter to you. After a November December and January the fairest softest and finest that ever were known in this Place, The Month of February has been ushered in by a considerable Snow: but the Weather is again so fine that the sun will soon restore Us the naked ground: I should like it better in its White...