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    • Confederation Period
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    • Adams, Abigail

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Documents filtered by: Period="Confederation Period" AND Correspondent="Adams, Abigail"
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I have the Satisfaction to inform you that the definitive Treaties were all Signed yesterday, and the Preliminaries with Holland were Signed the day before. Ours is a Simple Repetition of the provisional Treaty. So We have negotiated here, these Six Months for nothing. We could do no better Situated as We were. To day We dined with Mr. Hartley and drank Tea with the Duchess of Manchester. Thus...
I should deserve, all the reproaches which my friends in America have made me if I neglected writing, by so good an Opportunity as the one that presents itself at this time. Mr. Thaxter who will deliver you this expects to sail for New-York in the course of this Month. He will probably carry the Definitive Treaty, (which was at last signed yesterday,) to Congress. So you will not receive this...
This Morning for the first Time, was delivered me the Resolution of Congress of the first of May, that a Commission and Instructions Should be made Out, to Me, Dr. Franklin and Mr. Jay to make a Treaty of Commerce with Great Britain. If this Intelligence had been Sent Us by Barney, who Sailed from Philadelphia a Month after, the 1st of May, and has now been Sailed from hence on his return home...
We have received from Congress a Resolution by which We are to be impowered to negotiate a Treaty of Commerce with G. B. My self Mr. Franklin and Mr. Jay. This will detain me in Europe this Winter. If this Letter arrives in Season, that you can come to me this Fall with Miss Nabby, I shall be Supreamly happy to see you. But Still Things are so unsettled in Congress that you may expect to...
As you have ordered me in a Letter which I have Lately receiv’d to give you my own Observations on the Countries thro’ which I have travelled, the following are some upon Russia; but I must previously beg you will remember, that you Say in your Letter that you expect neither the precision of a Robertson, nor the Elegance of a Voltaire, therefore you must take them as they are. The government...
It will not be in my power to get Beaf. Bisquit I can procure, I shall prepaire a dinner here and stop all our Boston Friends with me, in order to save you as much trouble as I can. Cannot you get mourning clothes made at the drs Dr. Cotton Tufts . Sister Cranch sent for 15 yds possibly she may spair some. You had better take what black Gauze you want for the family at the drs. I think it...
I embrace the Oppertunity by Mr. Guild, of informing You, that Mr. Adams was well the 27th. of July, and that by a Letter to the Minister of France of the 29th, the Dutch Negotiation with the British was finished, by which one great Obstacle to the definitive Treaty is removed. Inclosed is an Extract of an official Letter from Doctor F—to Mr. Livingston Secretary of foreign affairs dated July...
Dearer if possible than ever; for all the parental props which once sustaind and supported me are fallen! My Father, my Father, where is he? With Humble confidence I can say; he is with the spirits of just Men made perfect, become an inhabitant of that Country, from whose Bourn no traveller returns. In my last Letter to you, I recollect to have particularly mentiond both our dear and venerable...
I have had another Fever, which brought me low, but as it has carried off certain Pains and Lamenesses the Relicks of the Amsterdam Distemper, I am perswaded it will do me, much good. I am going next Week to London, with my son. I may Stay Six Weeks, if nothing from Congress calls me away Sooner. I have only to repeat my earnest Request that you and our Daughter would come to me, as soon as...
Your obligeing favour was handed me from Mr. Guild, at a time when I was engaged in the Melancholy office, of attending the dieing Bed, of a dear, and venerable parent. I need ask no further excuse of you for omiting a speedy replie, and thanking you for your kind attention to me. Neither the contents of your Letter; or the extracts inclosed, were unexpected to me; from many of Mr. Adam’es...