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your kind and Friendly Letter found me in great affliction for the loss of my dear and only daughter, mrs smith She had been with me only three weeks having undertaken a journey from the State of N york , desirious once more to See her parents, and to close her days under the paternal roof She was accompanied by her Son and daughter , who made every exeertion to get her here, and gratify what...
Never mind it, my dear Sir, if I write four Letters to your one: your one is worth more than my four. It is true that I can Say and have Said nothing new on the Subject of Government. yet I did Say in my Defence and in my Discourses on Davila, though in an uncouth Style, what was new to Lock , to Harrington , to Milton , to Hume to Montesquieu to Reauseau , to Turgot , Condorcet
I take the Liberty of addressing you in behalf of my son, now at st petersburgh, and to ask of you, permission for his return to his native Country. I hope you may have already received, through the Secretary of State, his own request to this effect. From Several Letters which I have received from Mrs Adams, I have been led to think their Situation very unpleasent, as it respected their...
Had you been no other than the private inhabitant of Montecello, I should e’er this time have addrest you, with that sympathy, which a recent event has awakend in my Bosom. but reasons of various kinds withheld my pen, untill the powerfull feelings of my heart, have burst through the restraint, and called upon me to shed the tear of sorrow over the departed remains, of your beloved and...
I received your two Letters together of August 26 th . I have every day since designd to write to you, but have not been very well. I do not know the cause yet for many years, the Month of sep’ br has depressed my Spirits more than any other. I believe it always brings with it, some dregs of the old Ague and fever— I most sincerely mourn for the distressess of N york and Philadelphia; but know...
I received with much pleasure your Letters of August 1 st and 12th, for which accept my thanks. I read the papers as usual, and find the Ethiope washed white by the Necromancing powers of dallas & co— but I was not a little surprizd by the information which mr H G otis assured me, he received from a correspondent in Philadelphia, viz that our Friend Dr Rush and Mr Hartley of York Town were...
I received yours of the 21 July upon my return from a Ride. your Father said he had a Letter for me worth a thousand pounds I found it had been read; I complaind, but was told it was put in unseald, on purpose that it might be read. I had not any objection to its being seen, yet you know one chuses in such cases to be judge for themselves; I delight very much in your Letters. you have a...
Mr Houghten, an acquaintance of your Brother Thomas, call’d upon me last Evening, with the kind offer of taking Letters to you. I readily Embrace the opportunity, as it gives me the pleasure of sending you a Number of News papers, and two orations, neither of which stand in need of any Eulogy from me; they will proclaim their own Worth; and the public are not insensible to their merit. two...
I had the pleasure of seeing mr Peabody here, yesterday mor’g he got here the night before, but it was late, and I was gone to Bed, tho I had exceeded my usual Hour before the President arrived. he brought William with him. I think I do not feel my last Summers sickness in any way, so sensible, as by being languid, and wanting my rest at a particular Hour. if I vary much, I lose my sleep— I...
I know not how it is, but I always feel more spirits when I take my pen to write to you, than to any one else; I received a friendly Letter from dr Rush. the Good Gentleman endeavours to do away all the suspis he so innocently raised, and in doing it, your Father observed that it was ten to one. if he did not go to prateing to the Bishop or his daughters, and excite some Idea that he had been...