You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Adams, Abigail Smith
    • Adams, Abigail Smith
  • Correspondent

    • Adams, Abigail Smith

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Correspondent="Adams, Abigail Smith"
Results 1-10 of 788 sorted by recipient
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
You will imagine that the place from which I now write you has been thus named by us; but so it was not—We found the names already settled—Ealing is a parish in the immediate neighbourhood of Brentford, that “town of mud”—immortalized in the Poetry of Pope and Swift; and the house in which we reside has been thus named by its proprietor, in honour of a kinsman of his, one Lord Boston, who has...
I wrote to you about the 20th. Inst. which probably you have receiv’d by this Time—I rejoice to hear that Mr. Marshall has arrived and hope for the Arrival of the other Envoys soon—Their long & patient stay at Paris under a State of Humiliation, was considerd by many as too degrading, it may however have answered some good Purposes and eased the Minds of some who perhaps would have thought,...
It was with regret, that I left Boston without seeing you again, but we were in such a state of uncertainty, till it was tame to take our departer, that it was not in my power. I am extremely sorry to hear by Mrs Cushing that you was very unwell, when she left you; but hope that you are quite recovered; by this, & that you will enjoy the society of your friends and neighbours this winter,...
On the 24. May I had the very great satisfaction of receiving your kind letter of 23d. February. I felt doubly obligated to you for it as I conscious it must have been written under the impression, arising from the existing relations between the U. States and Britain, that the probabilities were very much against my ever receiving it; and I regret to say that the political appearances are not...
Last week I sent you a number of the Monthly Theological Repository, containing some Speculations of Mr Van der Kemp and Mr Jefferson—With this Letter I enclose to my Father the numbers just published of the Edinburgh and Quarterly Reviews—Presuming that you know the History and Character of those Publications from Cobbett, you will sufficiently understand them to be in the Nature of Lawyer’s...
I never received a Letter from my dear Mrs. Adams but that an emotion was awakened which is not felt in every epistolary intercourse.—When I saw her signature under date of Decr. 31st: my heart glowed with the same affection which had long been cherished in my bosom, towards one I had loved and placed confidence in, without a suspicion, that the regard was not mutual.— You assure me that there...
Not one word have I heard from you my dear Friend since your kind letter, saying that you was but just leaving the chamber, after a long confinement. I hope & pray that you soon regained your usual health though that at best is delicate. Various circumstances have prevented my being with you ere this. Three weeks since I was called to Plymouth, to sympathize with my beloved Mrs Hammatt for the...
I had the honor of your favor of the 14th of last month enclosed to me by Mr Smith, and upon this, as on all other occasions, was gratified at the receipt of it. There was also one for Mrs Madison, which I will take great pleasure in presenting to her, as soon as she returns to Washington. She is now expected in the course of a few days. I most sincerely hope, that the wishes of Mr John Adams...
I have received your Letters of 10. 15. and 16. Your solicitude for my Health may Subside. I am pretty well—I had a cold, not a bad one, and something of the Inflammation in my face of last Spring, but it is gone. Rush gave me such a Dose of Salts that I thought it not fit to go out to Congress next day. But the day after I was well enough...I am Old—Old very Old and never shall be very...
I was in hopes ere this time of having the satisfaction of seeing you here, but from what I could learn from Dr Bourn of Barnstable, who spoke with the President last week, it is to be feared that your unfortunate fall has occasioned a much longer confinement than we flattered ourselves it would. I have several times been determined that another week should not pass without my writing, but my...