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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Correspondent="Adams, Abigail Smith"
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I have been very happy, with our Thomas Since his Arrival: He runs about with his black head and blue Coat among his old Quaker Aquaintances, who all accost him in the friendly style “Thomas how dost thee do?” He Seems inclined to Settle in Phyladelphia: but will not determine till he goes to Quincy and makes Inquiries there.—I have laid before him Quincy & Phyladelphia with their Advantages...
I am almost dead with a horrid cold and fear that before I shall half finish this letter I shall drown it with water, from my eyes. I wish I felt well and in good spirits enough to give you an account of the presidents ball—It was brilliant indeed, and the ladies were drest and looked almost too beautiful. The president enjoyed himself much better, than he would have done, had not Cousen...
I have had the pleasure of seeing and perusing two or three letters from you to my Father and Mr. Shaw since my arrival here, and have learnt with joy that your health is better than it has been for some time past. Do not be impatient for my coming on, for I shall certainly make no unnecessary delay, and unless I should take a run to George town for a moment, I shall set off for Boston on...
I have sat down to enclose to you the dispatches of Mr. Gerry—The Secy’s report I will send you when published. It will not be relished by the Jacobins. I have lately been reading a most enchanting poem called Joan of Arc by a Mr Southey. It has some faults in respect to its diction and versification but not withstanding these blemishes, it abounds in beauties and excellencies of the highest...
I am as much of a Solitudinarian as Frederick the Conqueror. He was constantly Saying at Sixty Je Suis vieux, cassé, Surannée &c &c &c I may Say the Same and have the honor to resemble him in this particular: But I shall never imitate his Idolatry for Voltaire. His Materialism appears to me very Superficial. He insists upon being all matter, without knowing what matter is. The Monades, the...
In my solitude in Markett street, I find nothing so sociable as your Letters—those of 18 & 20th. are this moment recd.—Your health & Spirits are a great Improvement of mine. I have avoided the Epithets perfidious and unprincipled as much as I could, but neither they nor any that could be borrowed from the Hebrew & the Greek would be too strong, for the House of Mass to Use.— My Religion you...
After many expecting, anxious hours for my dear Nephew, I am made happy by seeing his safe arrival announced in the Newspaper—The fibres of my heart cannot remain untouched, while my Sisters must be filled with joy, & gratitude— I claim a share, & feel that I am a maternal Participant—I know that you long to clasp your Son in your fond arms—When he reaches Peace-field you will think the order...
Mr Adams left us yesterday morning for New York. He expects his business will detain him till monday, when he will set out for Quincy. I shall miss his company very much. I have read Mr. Gerry’s communications to Congress over and over again. The directory French government, in these last dispatches, displays in the most captivating manner, the charming pictures of candor, frankness and...
Indeed my dear Madam, I was very happy to receive a letter from you, after hearing you had been so very ill, at the time I wrote, I did not know you was so dangerously sick, or I would not have troubled you; That Health may be restore’d, that your days, may be free from Complaints, and that your nights, may be blessed with quiet sleep, is the ardent wish of your friend: I hope soon, to hear...
On Tuesday Mr T. B. Adams left Us at Eleven in the stage for New York & Boston and consequently Quincy.—I should have been glad to have held him till I could carry him with me: but I thought it my Duty to comply with his desire, both for his sake and yours.—He Seems determined to settle in Phyladelphia.—He would have a happier Life, and be a more important Man in Quincy: But I must do & say as...