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    • Cranch, Mary Smith
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    • Adams, Abigail Smith
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    • Adams, Abigail Smith

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Documents filtered by: Author="Cranch, Mary Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Correspondent="Adams, Abigail Smith"
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I can never sufficiently thank you for your Letters. & the communications you so frequently Supply me with. I am consider’d as the fountain head from whence Couth truth is to be look’d for. I have read parts of your Letter’s till I have them by heart and can preach very well without notes now. Wherever I go I am scarcly welcome without I bring my pocket full of Letters. I was last week Several...
I receiv’d your kind Letter of the 18th yesterday and am glad to find you able to receive so much company tho I fear it will not be advantagous to your nightly repose I was in Boston last Week and find the appointment of the Envoys is growing to be a very popular action some extracts from Joel Barlows Letters have made the appointment appear an act of wisdom—these extracts were in John Russels...
I was very glad to hear by the Letter you sent me from Brookfield that you had got safely so far. the week proved so stormy & disagreable—I was affraid I should hear you were sick. This week has been in general so pleasant excepting one day very windy that I hope you are safe at East Chester this evening, & that the President is recover’d from his cold, your children well & the sweet Caroline...
My fears are all alive. cousin Thomas wrote Mr Cranch that his mother was not so well as she had been I have observ’d many threatnings for some weeks past. many cares upon the mind perplexities, wait to be revolv’d when the Head is laid upon the Pillow added to the Rhumaick affections which march generally produces.—surely here are causes enough to make me fear that sickness is the cause of my...
your excellent Letter of the 26th of May I receiv’d a Saterday. I have heard or seen Something about this Book of Mr Robinson’s & have wish’d to read it. Tis about to be Printed in Boston. mr Kirkland tells me who preach’d here yesterday—you put it into right hands when you sent it to Doctor Belnap. this country will owe much Of their safety to the clergy. There is not to be found so much...
I have receiv’d two Letters from you since I wrote last, one contain’d the Border & Lace for my Cape & a cap for mrs Norton, for which We thank you. mrs Greenleaf also for hers—How you do love to dress up your Friends! There is certainly more pleasure in it than in adorning our own Person! We cant wear our Blue ribbons yet. We are all in mourning—not a person in our meeting house but has some...
I feel an inclination to write you every Week athough I have nothing new to inform you of I know you are as interested as I am in know the result of the present negotiation about Mr. Whitney. We have so far gone on very smoothly. The committee met as I told you they were to—nine of them—Mr. Cranch Mr Black, Capt. Beal Mr Spear & Cary; these were the old ones who invited Mr Whitney. To these...
I yesterday reciev’d your Letter of Decm. 4th with the Presidents Speech. We had seen and admir’d it before. I have not heard any one speak of it but with approbation. I am sure some of our Feds must feel asham’d of themselves. Will they never learn to trust where they have plac’d confidence? I hope my Sister We shall keep out of the Fire but I have my fears the President must not be Weary of...
I know your impatience to hear frequently of your affairs here & I am as solicitous that you should—last week & untill this morning it has not been in my power to write you more than a few lines. Mrs. Norton came here with Edward & Thomas last thursday week for me to nurse her with the proper sufficiency she has been very ill a violent distressing cough, & not able to take the least care of...
There is a great deal of pain; taken to make mischief between you & Mr & Mrs. Porter Many wish for his birth but I am confident no one who has offer’d would take better care of your things in the house or to Whom you could trust them with equal satefy. James Howard is very busy & very abusive, told mr. cranch that he heard Mr Porter was going, & that it was time he should—he loved his tricks....