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    • Cranch, Mary Smith
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    • Adams, Abigail Smith
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    • Adams, Abigail Smith

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Documents filtered by: Author="Cranch, Mary Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Correspondent="Adams, Abigail Smith"
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There is a great deal of pain; taken to make mischief between you & Mr & Mrs. Porter Many wish for his birth but I am confident no one who has offer’d would take better care of your things in the house or to Whom you could trust them with equal satefy. James Howard is very busy & very abusive, told mr. cranch that he heard Mr Porter was going, & that it was time he should—he loved his tricks....
I donnot like to let a week pass without writing a few Lines to let you know how we are & what we are about. as to your House if the winter holds on at the rate it has done since March came in it will not be very soon done. we had for two days past a violent storm of rain snow & hail, & tis now very cold. Judge cushing is not yet arriv’d at least I have not heard of them & I think I should if...
you have not told me that the Lady in the undress who was presented at your Drawing Room had been connected with a Frenchman, but I suspect she had. I know not where else she could have got her impudence. a shameless woman is a horrid sight. The frightful wigs the Ladies wear here & cover up their own beautiful ringlets is an evidence of a great want of tast, but we are not yet so lost to...
My fears are all alive. cousin Thomas wrote Mr Cranch that his mother was not so well as she had been I have observ’d many threatnings for some weeks past. many cares upon the mind perplexities, wait to be revolv’d when the Head is laid upon the Pillow added to the Rhumaick affections which march generally produces.—surely here are causes enough to make me fear that sickness is the cause of my...
I know your impatience to hear frequently of your affairs here & I am as solicitous that you should—last week & untill this morning it has not been in my power to write you more than a few lines. Mrs. Norton came here with Edward & Thomas last thursday week for me to nurse her with the proper sufficiency she has been very ill a violent distressing cough, & not able to take the least care of...
I clos’d my last Letter by informing you that Mr & Mrs Gannett were returned. I went down to receive them & found them both sick he with the Gout in his Foot & She with a violent cold I had them both to nurse till the next morning for it rain’d so hard all the afternoon that they could not return home—Mrs Norton is got below to day but is very feeble, & I hop’d to have had our house not quite...
Welcome thou best of women thou best of sisters, thou kindest of Friends, the soother of ever y human woe to the city of Washington. Welcome to the best Men Welcome to a who love, honor & respects: you take their Sweet offspring to your benevolent Bosom & say to them Thus would your grandmama do if she could hold you in her arms.—I tremble I can scarcely hold my pen other s must tell you how I...
I last week receiv’d your first Letter from the city of Washington. I began to grow impatient not to receive one Line neither from you nor my Son, but last thursdays mail brought yours & one from him to his Father. I had heard of your arrival by mr. Brislers Letter to his Wife,—but I wanted to hear your own account of your journey I receiv’d your two Letters written upon the road & thank you...
I last week receiv’d your kind Letter of the 10th of this month. I have certainly lost one. It must have been in the lost mail, but how was it lost? I never heard of it till you mention’d it. yes my sister I have been & still am greatly affected by your afflictions—Heaven may in great kindness have taken your child from a seducing world, when temtation become too strong for virtue surely tis...
I have just clos’d a long Letter to Sister Peabody from whom I received one last week—It is the first I have written to her since I was sick She is well herself but Mr. Peabody has been more unwell than since they were married a sore in his ear attended with great pain in his neck he is better, & got out again—I hope you my dear Sister are well of your cold, but your troubles must be great...