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    • Adams, Abigail Smith
    • Adams, John Quincy

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Correspondent="Adams, John Quincy"
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your Last Letter was dated in July No 45, near Six months since. the Secretary of State has one, in Sep’br since that period; a very long one to me, not a word have I heard from you I learnt from your Brother Thomas that you had been sick of an intermitting fever. that Letter was also in Sep’br—I have myself been very deficient in writing to you; my mind revolts at looking back to the period...
I wrote to you about a week since by the British packet, but a vessel going for Hamburgh gives me a fresh opportunity of addressing you. I have requested your Brother to make a collection of papers and pamphlets for you, which he has done. I am very solicitious to hear from you. I know not that I have ever been so long a time without Letters from you. Your last to me was the 3d of July—I know...
Mr Sitgreaves has just call’d to let me know that he expects to embark for England in a Day or two. I will not Suffer so direct a conveyance to escape me, without writing you a few lines. Your Brother having written to you, will be my apology for not entering minutely into politicks. Since I wrote to you last, which was by way of Hamburgh, I have received your Letter dated Dresden Sep’br 17th....
A few days ago, I received your favour of 30. December of the last year; after a long interval during which I had not heard from you; and the communication with England from Hamburg having been for six weeks interrupted by the severity of the season, I was nearly the whole of that time without receiving any information from America—When it came at last, it was in one respect, of a nature...
The Prussian Consul General has just calld upon me to inform me, that he Shall proceed to Nyork on Monday, and from thence embark for England on his Way to Berlin. He has politely offerd to be the bearer of any packet I may wish to convey to you. I embrace the opportunity of Sending you Some News papers and pamphlets, a number of which are orations, upon the Character of the late General...
By a vessel going to Liverpool I write you a few line’s with the hope that the communication may be now open, for no Letters have been received from you of a later date than Nov’br. I have written to You several times Since I came to this City, and your Brother oftner—I have the pleasure to acquaint you that we have all enjoyd our Healths this Winter. my own is better than for several years...
We are still without Letters from you. The Secretary of State received one dated in December; but no private Letter has reached any of your Family of a later date than early in Nov’br, now six months. I have noticed by the last English papers that many mails were due from Hamburgh. I fear that Letters from you have been intercepted, or stoped. I have written to you a Number of times since I...
The latest letters I have had the pleasure of receiving from you are of January 5. and Feby 8. But Mr: Paleske has arrived at London on his way hither, and I expect to see him here in the course of a few days—He informs me that he has letters for me from you. A longer time has elapsed since I wrote you last than I can apologize for with propriety; it is possible that at some future day I may...
Mr: Paleske arrived here a few days after I wrote you last, and delivered me your letter and the pamphlets together with the dispatches from the Secretary of State, and the letters to my wife; which were extremely acceptable to her, as she had been so long without hearing from her parents. I was much gratified by your anecdotes respecting the proceedings in the Senate upon the Treaty—The...
A few days ago, I received your favours of 27. April and 15. May; together. The latter was forwarded from England by Mr Treat, and had on its passage been inspected by the officer of a french privateer. With respect to the changes of the heads of departments, I have not the means of forming a judgment—That they were necessary I can as little doubt, as I can avoid lamenting that necessity.—If...