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    • Wolcott, Oliver, Jr.
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    • Adams Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Wolcott, Oliver, Jr." AND Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 131-140 of 142 sorted by relevance
I have recd. your favours of the 16th. & 17th. —that of the 16th I communicated to Mr. Marshall & Mr. Sedgwick; the first has yet expressed no ⟨op⟩inion; the last mentioned Gentleman has been inclined to support Mr. Burr & this I find appears to be a prevailing & increasing sentiment of the Federalists—with what degree of seriousness the intention is formed & whether it can succeed are...
The Secretary of the Treasury respectfully submits to the consideration of the President of the United States, the following observations upon the measures proper to be taken for obtaining an explanation of the 6th. article of the Treaty with Great Britain. It is believed, that the Letter of the Attorney General to the President dated August 1st 1799 contains a just and candid Statement of...
The Secretary of the Treasury in obedience to the command of the President of the United States, respectfully reports his opinion on the following questions. 1st. Whether the refusal to receive Mr. Pinckney, and the rude orders to quit Paris and the Territory of the Republic with such circumstances of indignity, insult & hostility as we have been informed of, are bars to all further measures...
I have recd. your Letter of March 30th. and I consider it as a great acquisition. It developes the origin of a circumstance which came to my knowledge at the close of the last session which filled my mind with inexpressible surprize. To you I will say but in the most perfect confidence that the President had determined on instituting a Commission, but it would not have been composed as you now...
I have before me your favour of the 1st. instant. I have some knowledge of the circumstance referred to in Genl. Schuylers Letter. It is a fact that Mr. Shoemaker has either seen such a Letter from Mr. Jefferson as is described, or recd. such evidence that a Letter of the kind existed, as made a strong impression on his Mind. It has I know been proposed to make application to Mr. Smith’s son...
I recd your note and delivered the enclosure to Fenno who will publish it with its Successors. I hope it will do good, for if the Country cannot be roused from the Lethargy into which it fell in consequence of the miserable conduct of Congress last Summer, the Government will not in one year be worth defending. The papers relative to the Negotiation which has been attempted with France have...
I inclose you the pamphlet. You will see that the subject is but partially represented with a design to establish an opinion that you was concerned in speculations in the public funds. As my name is mentioned I have been repeatedly called on for explanations. What I have said is substantially as follows. That I was informed at the time, of the whole transaction, & that though Munroe...
Before I recd. your favour of the 6th. instant I had a plain conversation with Mr. McHenry and represented the necessity of having you called into service. It is unnecessary to repeat arguments—you must know their nature. The Presidents permission has been applied for by Mr. McHenry as I presumed —since his illness Colo. Pickering has reinforced the request. You must my friend come on with the...
I wrote you a hasty Letter yesterday in which I returned the draught which accompanied your favour of September 26th. In my opinion the style temper and spirit of the composition are well suited to the subject & will do you honour. I have only to submit a few criticisms to your consideration. The observations respecting Mr. T. Pinckneys predilection for France—in page 19. and his official...
I have recd. your favour of March 21st. Mr. Wharton is a young man of virtue modesty and industry—he is pliant and docile—but I have observed no indications of invention or what may be called Talents . He is what I recommended him for, a proper person to copy and assist a man who has much business—but I do not think it probable that he could perform more than what is commonly expected of a...