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Results 1861-1910 of 32,116 sorted by recipient
Mr Wood the bearer of this is a Gentleman of Virginia upon a Tour to Florida—He proposes before his return to explore some of the ungranted Lands in your Government; and, as I have never yet been able to Locate the Lands which I am entitled to under his Majesty’s Proclamation of October 1763 has promised that, if he meets with such Lands as he thinks will answer my purpose to have 10,000 acres...
Compliments and thanks to Mr Chew for the favor of perusing the enclosed letter. A different result, from the forebodings therein, would have been very pleasing. AL , MdHi : Bayard Collection. The letter is addressed, “The Honble Mr Chew”; whether the addressee was Benjamin Chew, Sr., or Jr., has not been determined. “1795” is not in GW’s handwriting. The writing looks to match that of a note...
It would have given me sincere pleasure to have serv’d you in your request of March the 10th (which by the by did not come to my hands till sometime late in May; after Colo. Pendleton, at the desire of Mr Madison, had made an unsuccessful application to Lord Dunmore for the Land you claim under your Brother Colby; whose Merits well entitles his heir to the Kings bounty) I say to have serv’d...
I shall be obliged to you, or either of you, who may be in the practice of hunting, or driving Deer on my land, for desisting from that practice. My Lands have been Posted, according to Law, many years; and never has, nor while I possess them, will be revoked. Besides this, in order to have the notification better understood by those who bordered on me, I had (as you will perceive by the...
On the 21st instt I was favored with your letter of the 10th. I am very sorry that so trivial a matter as that related in it, should have given you one moments pain. There must have been some misconception on the part of Colo. Burgess Ball if he understood that I had been informed it was you, who had killed my English Buck; for no such information that I can recollect ever was given to me. I...
On my return home I found your note of the 6th & Mr Whiting shewed me the letter you had written to him on the same subject the next day. When the first came to this place I was from home, & when the second was presented to me I was too much engaged to write myself, but desired Mr Whiting to inform you of my objections as I should do as soon [as] I had leisure. I should feel no...
You have been informed that last Spring, I sent Major Doughty, one of the warriors of the United States, to brighten the Chain of friendship with the Chickasaw nation, and to assure them of the firm adherence of the United States to the treaty of Hopewell—You know the dis-aster which befell him by the Attack of some bad Indians on the Tenassee, who violated the white flag of peace. Brothers! I...
I thank the great Spirit that I have the opportunity of taking you by the hand in this City, and that you are all in good health after so great a Journey. I have long desired to see you and I have caused you to be invited to make this visit, and I thank you for performing it—I love the Chickasaws and it will always afford me sincere satisfaction, to be instrumental to their happiness in any...
The Talk of the President of the United States to Major William Colbert, John Brown the Younger and William MGillivray, Chickasaws, and Malcolm MGhee Interpreter, representing the Chickasaw Nation. My Children I have considered the written Talk from the Headmen of the Chickasaw Nation, which you delivered to me four-days ago. The subject I had before considered in consequence of the written...
For reasons that will be obvious to you, it is thought the publication of the inclosed address may answer valuable ends; and I beg leave to submit to you, whether it may not serve to increase its effect, if it were ushered into the papers of your State with a recommendatory line from yourself. If you should suppose there will be any impropriety in this, you will be pleased notwithstanding to...
G eorge W ashington, P resident of the U nited S tates of A merica, To all to whom these Presents shall come: K now ye, That the nation of Indians called the Kaskaskia inhabiting the town of Kaskaskia and other towns, villages, and lands of the same community, are, in their persons, towns, villages, lands, hunting-grounds and other rights and property in the peace and under the protection of...
Chiefs and Warriors of the Tribes of Indians residi⟨ng⟩ on the Wabash and Illinois Rivers. As you are now about to return to your own Country, I take you by the hand and wish you a pleasant Journey. When you arrived here I was glad to see you, because I believed your undertaking so long a Journey, was a Strong assurance of your disposition to Cultivate peace and friendship with the United...
I have sent Major Doughty one of our Warriors, in order to convince you that the United States well remember the treaty they made with your Nation four years ago at Hopewell on the Keowee—guard and protect him and show him the places at which trading posts shall be established in order to furnish you with goods; and when the said posts shall be established, support them to the utmost of your...
I am glad to hear by Major Shaw, that You Accepted of the Chain of Freindship which I sent you last February from Cambridge, & that you are determined to keep it bright and unbroken. When I first heard that you refused to send any of your Warriours to my Assistance when called upon by our Brothers of St Johns I did not know what to think; I was Afraid that some Enemy had turned your Hearts...
The Honourable, the Continental Congress, having lately passed a Resolve, contained in the following words, to wit. “That two persons be sent at the Expence of these Colonies to novascotia, to inquire into the state of that Colony, the disposition of the Inhabitants towards the American cause, & the Condition of the Fortifications, Docks, Yards, the Quantity of Artillery & Warlike stores, &...
Your favr of the 1st Inst. came to my hands yesterday. I am exceedingly obliged to you for the information you give me respecting the mode that is adopted for the settlement of claims for waste &ca committed by the Army. I have been much embarrassed by applications of this nature, and where I have given order⟨s⟩ in the matter, it has been solely with a veiw of relieving individuals whose...
I have the honor to enclose to you, an Extract of the Deposition of Christopher Osgood of Brattleborough &c. taken before the Honble Chief Justice Mumford, on the 13th of Novr last; also a the Copy of a Resolution of Congress of the 27th of November 1782; in obedience to which, I have caused the Persons therein named to be apprehended. I am, Sir, with Your Most Obedt & Hble Servt. DLC : Papers...
I received your favour of the 14th of November by Mr Brownson. You cannot be at a loss to know why I have not heretofore, and why I cannot now, address you in your public Character, or answer you in mine: But the confidence which you have been pleased to repose in me gives me an opportunity of offering you my sentiments, as an individual wishing most ardently to see the peace and Union of his...
I have the honor with many congratulations to inform you, that One OClock this afternoon is appointed for the delivery of two of the Enemys redouts on the Gloucester Side, One to a detachment of french the other to a detachment of American Troops—The Garrison is to march out at three OClock—with shouldered Arms, Drums beating a british or German March, the Cavalry with their Swords drawn—and...
Late this Evening I was honored with your favr of this date—without delay, & in much haste I inclose you a copy of such articles of the Capitulation as are immediately & essentially necessary for your Government. With much esteem and Respect I am Sir Yr Most Obt Ser. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have received the Letter which you did me the Honor to write this Morng & am much indebted to you for the Arrangements which you were so good as to make relative to the surrendering Troops. I have ordered a Continental Officer to go & take charge of the Arms &c. and the persons of the several Departments will receive the Effects that Regard them. I have the Honor to be &c. DLC : Papers of...
The Quarter Master General is authorized by me to take charge of all the horses captured at Gloucester, as part of the public property which falls under his department—I request that you will be pleased to give positive orders to prevent the exchange or release of any of them—and in case any horses have been inadvertently removed by either means, that you will be so good as to direct how they...
With much sensibility I received your polite letter of the 25th of March from Kingston. I thank you, Sir, for the plants which are mentioned in the list which accompanied it. Presuming they arrived at Norfolk with the letter, I have requested a Gentleman of my acquaintan⟨ce⟩ at that place, to forward them to my Garden at Mount Vernon on Potomack River, near Alexandria Virginia; and I feel...
[ Pompton, New Jersey, June 4, 1779. ] Instructs Christie to inform Major General Alexander McDougall of the present position of the Army at Pompton. Orders Christie to secure information on McDougall’s defenses. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
To proceed immediately to West Point To inform the Garrison where we are—two divisions at Pompton—one near Mr Lot’s about ten miles in the rear of the others—the whole to move this night at moon rising—by way of Ringwood & to press forward with all possible diligence. To assure them that I am determined at the utmost hazard to support the fort and that I expect it will hold out to the last...
As the letter, which you were pleased to address to me on the 27th of November, relates to an event of public import, yet to be determined, and on which the decision may be governed by circumstances not yet considered, I can only do myself the honor to acknowledge the receipt of it—and to express the respectful consideration with which I am Madam Your most Obedt Servt ALS , CSmH ; LB , DLC:GW...
George Washington Esquire General and Commander in Chief of the Forces of the United States of America &c. &c. &c. To All to whom these presents shall come, sendeth Greeting. Whereas it hath ever been an established maxim in the American Service, that the Road to Glory was open to All, that Honorary Rewards and Distinctions were the greatest Stimuli to virtuous Actions, and that distinguished...
I am desird in a Letter which I have just received from Colo. Bassett, to send to you for a Chesnut horse that he has lately purchased—the bearer awaits on you for the purpose. I was in hopes we should have had the pleasure of seeing you at Mount Vernon in yo[ur] way up—Mrs. Washington (who joins in her Compliments) impeaches you of a breach of promise in failure of this, and I don’t know a...
You will be pleased to direct the issuing Commissary to the Troops under the command of Colo. Sheldon, to remove his Store to the House of Mr Rundle in C antits , for the greater convenience of supplying those Troops. I am Gentmn Yr most obt Servt MH .
A General Court Martial is to be held at Springfeild on the 15th April next for the trial of Mr Isaac Tichenor Dy Commy of purchases at Coos on sundry Charges exhibited against him by Colonel Hazen, and for the trial of Jacob Bailey Esqr. Dy Qr Mr Genl at Coos on a charge of neglect of duty exhibited against him by Mr Tichenor. After going thro’ the before mentioned trials, part of the Members...
The very polite invitation which you have given me in the name of the Citizens of Alexandria, to celebrate with them the approaching Anniversary of American Independence —is received by me as a mark of attention meriting my warmest thanks—and as the best proof I can give of my feelings on the occasion will be to accept the invitation, I shall accordingly have the pleasure of meeting them at...
I receive your congratulations on my arrival in Augusta with great pleasure—I am much obliged by your assurances of regard, and thank you, with unfeigned sincerity, for the favorable sentiments you are pleased to express towards me. Entreating you to be persuaded of my gratitude, I desire to assure you that it will afford me the most sensible satisfaction to learn the progression of your...
The tokens of regard and affection, which I have often received from the Citizens of this Town, were always acceptable; because, I believed them, always sincere. Be pleased to receive my best acknowledgments for the renewal of them, on the present occasion. If the affectionate partiality of my fellow Citizens has prompted them to ascribe greater effects to my conduct & character, than were...
The obligations, which your goodness has imposed upon me, demand my grateful acknowledgements—Your esteem does me honor, and your affection communicates the truest pleasure—by endeavoring to deserve, I will indulge the hope of retaining them. Over-rating my services, you have ascribed consequences to them, in which it would be injustice to deny a participation to the virtue and firmness of my...
The acknowledgements which your respectful and affectionate address demands I offer to you with unfeigned sincerity—I receive your congratulations with pleasure, and, estimating your welcome of me to Camden by a conviction of its cordiality, I render those thanks to your politeness and hospitality, to which they are so justly entitled. Your grateful remembrance of that excellent friend and...
I am much obliged by your professions of respect and affection, and I am truly grateful for your kind regards and good wishes. Replying to them with sincere acknowledgement, I desire to assure you that I shall always remember with pleasure your polite attentions. LB , DLC:GW . GW arrived late on 22 May 1791 at Columbia, S.C., and was forced to remain there until 4:00 A.M. on 25 May because of...
It is due to your goodness, and to my own feelings, that I should express the sensibility excited by your address, and that I should acknowledge the grateful pleasure with which I receive it. My best services are more than compensated by the affectionate partiality of my fellow-citizens—and my most anxious wishes are gratified in observing the happiness which pervades our country. The very...
With the greatest pleasure, I receive in the character of a private Citizen, the honor of your Address. To a benevolent Providence, and the fortitude of a brave and virtuous army, supported by the general exertion of our common Country, I stand indebted for the plaudits you now bestow. The reflection however, of having met the congratulating smiles and approbation of my Fellow-Citizens, for...
Having once more engaged in the arduous duties of public life, (after I had retired therefrom with the most ardent wishes and pleasing hopes that no circumstances would occur to call me from my peaceful abode during the few remaining years of my life) I cannot be insensible to the approbation of my fellow Citizens. And, while I thank you, Gentlemen, for your warm & friendly Address, permit me...
The reception with which you have been pleased to honor my arrival in Marblehead, and the sentiments of approbation and attachment which you have expressed of my conduct, and to my person, are too flattering and grateful not to be acknowledged with sincere thanks, and answered with unfeigned wishes for your prosperity. Avoiding to dwell on the diminution of pleasure, which the mention of your...
The demonstrations of respect and affection which you are pleased to pay to an individual, whose highest pretension is to rank as your fellow-citizen, are of a nature too distinguished not to claim the warmest return that gratitude can make. My endeavors to be useful to my country have been no more than the result of conscious duty—Regards like yours would reward services of the highest...
The motives which have induced a public expression of your sentiments at the present juncture, are such as naturally operate upon good Citizens, when points which materially concern the happiness of their Country are the subjects of discussion. Your approbation of my conduct on the occasion, to which it relates, could not fail to give me particular pleasure, and to serve as a support to my...
The affectionate address presented by the Magistrates and the general joy testified by the Citizens of New York, on my arrival in this Metropolis, have filled my mind with the mingled emotions of gratitude and satisfaction. In accepting the momentuous trust which has been spontaneously committed to me by a free people; it was not enough to have felt a consciousness of having acted in...
Your letter (to me), conveying to me the resolutions of the Citizens of New York, at their late meeting, affords me much satisfaction. The approving voice of my Fellow Citizens can never be heard by me, with indifference. That of the Inhabitants of your respectable metropolis, must always give particular pleasure. A unanimity so perfect as appears to have prevailed among them, upon an occasion...
I am sensibly impressed with your friendly welcome to the Metropolis of New Hampshire, and have a grateful heart for your kind and flattering congratulations on my election to the Presidency of these United States. I fear the fond partiality of my countrymen has too highly appreciated my past exertions, and formed too sanguine anticipations of my future services—If the former have been...
My best thanks for your cordial welcome and affectionate address are not more justly due than sincerely offered. I am much indebted to your good wishes, which I reciprocate with grateful regard. LB , DLC:GW . GW and his party on 10 May lodged at O’Brian Smith’s plantation in St. Bartholomew’s Parish and the next afternoon reached Pocotaligo, S.C., “where a dinner was provided by the...
Among the numerous expressions of the public sense, in favor of the measures which have been adopted for the observance of neutrality in the present war of Europe, none is more grateful to me, than that of the Inhabitants of Richmond & its vicinity. The manner in which it is conveyed, lays claim to my affectionate acknowledgements. In recollecting the anticipations wch were entertained of a...
I receive your congratulations with pleasure, and I reply to your flattering and affectionate expressions of esteem with sincere and grateful regard. The satisfaction which you derive from the congeniality of freedom with good government, clearly evinced in the happiness of our highly favored country, at once rewards the patriotism that atchieved her liberty and gives an assurance of its...
I have received your letter of the 17th ulto. It would interfere with no views of mine, to give you a field to speculate in, if I was sufficiently master of the business, & had leisure for these kind of communications: but the truth is, I do not turn my thoughts to matters of that sort, & if I did, the business in which you want to be informed is too much in embryo—& depends too much on...
You will proceed forthwith to Morris Town and inform yourself of the measures taken to remove the stores and baggage of the army from Morris and from Succussunni toward Sussex Court House and the North River, and you will take such additional measures as appear necessary to remove them effectually and with the greatest expedition. The flour and salted meat, except what the Commissaries think...