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We are in a situation of extremity for want of meat. The Troops on several days have been intirely destitute of Any—and for a considerable time past—they have been at best at half—at quarter—at an Eighth allowance of this essential Article—This distress produced a mutiny last night in the Connecticut line, I entreat your best & every exertion to give us relief. I am Dr Sir, with great regard...
While I was on my Journey through the Southern States it was not in my power to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 24th of May, which was put into my hands at Camden, and to make a proper return of my thanks for the Manuscript reflections upon our present situation &c. —and the printed Volume of your Observations on the Commercial Connexion between Great Britain and the United...
By an accidental conveyance I recd some time ago the Representation you was pleased to address to me on the 25 Ulto respecting the apprehension of Lt Stone of the 1st Masstts Regt for the murder of Capt. Hitchcock of the same Regt, having been until then, totally unacquainted with the circumstances of that unhappy affair some time has been unavoidably consumed in investigating & pointing out...
My Nephew, who will have the honor of presenting this Letter to you, has been in bad health more than twelve months and is advised to try the Climate & Sea Air of Rhode Island by his Physicians—Any Civilities which you may be kind enough to shew him will be thankfully acknowledged by Sir Yr most Obedt Servt Sent also to Caleb Gardner, Jabez Bowen, Isaac Collins and William Greene. RNHi .
Not until within a few days have I been honor’d with your favor of the 27th of Septr 1783 accompanying your treatise on Education. My sentiments are perfectly in unison with yours sir, that the best means of forming a manly, virtuous and happy people, will be found in the right education of youth. Without this foundation, every other means, in my opinion, must fail; & it gives me pleasure to...
I have chosen David Humphreys, one of our distinguished citizens, to reside near your Majesty in quality of Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America. From a knowledge of his fidelity, probity and good conduct, I have entire confidence that he will render himself acceptable to your Majesty that he will study to preserve and strengthen the harmony and good understanding so...
The interests of the United States which were committed to the care of William Short, Minister Resident near you for the United States of America, admitting of his absence, and the state of his health requiring a change of climate, he has desired permission to return to America. We have, therefore, yielded to his request. He will accordingly take his leave of you; embracing that occasion to...
I have made choice of William Short, who until his late Mission to the Court of Your Majesty, hath for some time past resided at the Hague in quality of Minister of the United States of America, near their High Mightinesses the States General of the United Netherlands, now to reside near Your Majesty in quality of Minister of the United States of America. He is well apprized of the friendship...
Your congratulations on my arrival in South Carolina, enhanced by the affectionate manner in which they are offered, are received with the most grateful sensibility. Flattered by the favorable sentiments you express of my endeavors to be useful to our country, I desire to assure you of my constant solicitude for its welfare, and of my particular satisfaction in observing the advantages which...
I beg you will accept and offer my best thanks to the corporation and the citizens of Charleston, for their very polite attention to me. Should it ever be in my power, be assured, it will give me pleasure to visit again this very respectable city. City Gazette, or the Daily Advertiser [Charleston, S.C.], 14 May 1791. GW’s party left Charleston at 6:00 A.M. on 9 May 1791 accompanied to the...
I receive your congratulations on my unanimous appointment to the first magistracy of a free People with that grateful sensibility which is due to the occasion, and which your flattering expressions of regard could not fail to awaken. Persuaded that the candor of my countrymen will do justice to the rectitude of my intentions, I am happy under the assurance that their active support of the...
This Letter will be delivered to you by Rufus King, one of Our distinguished Citizens, whom I have Named Minister Plenipotentiary to reside near the Person of Your Royal Consort. My knowledge of his good qualities gives me full confidence that he will so conduct himself as to merit Your esteem and I pray that you yield entire Credence to the assurances which he will give you of Our Friendship...
I have received your polite letter of the 2d Ulto and am much obliged to you for your kind wishes for my health and welfare—you will be so good as to accept of my best wishes for the reestablishment of your health which I am sorry to hear has been so much impaired of late—The keen air of the season, will, it is to be hoped, militate with your disorder and produce a favourable change in your...
The letter which you did me the favor to write to me from Philadelphia, on the 5th instt, came safely to hand; and would have received an early acknowledgmt had not frequent calls from home, and unavoidable business prevented it. I do not perceive, upon recurring to the subject, that I can be more explicit in the description of my Lands on the big Kanhawa, and on the Ohio, between the two...
The rude draughts herewith enclosed will, in some degree, comply with your request; because it will shew the shape of the lands about which you have been treating. The Ship by which they are sent, heaving in sight before I had notice of its coming, I could do no more than send them in the unpolished state in which they are now handed to you. The descriptions & situations of them you already...
Permit me, Gentlemen, to offer to you my sincere thanks for you r Congratulations on the happy events, of Peace and the Establishment of our Independence. If my Conduct throughout the War has merited the confidence of my fellow Citizens—and has been instrumental in obtaing for my Country the blessings of Peace and Freedom—I owe it to that Supreme being who guides the hearts of all—who has so...
[ Valley Forge ] April 27, 1778 . Discusses British practice of seizing and imprisoning civilians. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Chase was a member of the Continental Congress from Maryland.
Receive my thanks for your favor of 31st ulto, & for the copies therewith enclosed: they will answer my purposes equally with the fairest that could be made. When I found your Express at Mount Pleasant, & was unable to procure another in Marlbro’, I commenced one myself—got home before dinner, & dispatched one of my servants to Hooes ferry immediately. He placed the packet into the hands of...
Your favour of the 20th instant, I have received—The practice of seizing & confining the friends to America in the civil line, however barbarous it may be is a favourite engine of policy with the enemy; from which, I believe it will not be easy to make them depart. Their object is to deter men from taking an active and leading part in our governments; the firm establishment of which they...
Enclosed you have a petition from the Directors of the potomac Company, which we pray you to lay before the Maryland Assembly, & to use your exertions & influence to carry it into effect. The measure prayed for is so reasonable, that we do not conceive there can be any other opposition given to it, than what may proceed from delay; for the enemies to this undertaking (if there are any) ought...
I am to inform you that Col. Nicholson, of whose Character and Conduct you have received an unfavourable Impression is in Town—he comes for the Purpose of raising Recruits for a New-York Battalion, to the Command of which he has been nominated—When I intimated to him, that from certain Representations, I had received I judged him very unfit for the Employment he insisted upon a Court of...
I have yours of the 23d January inclosing a Resolution of Congress, whereby you are appointed one of seven Gentlemen to enquire into the Conduct of the British and Hessian Officers towards the Officers and Soldiers in the Service of the States and towards the Inhabitants of the States of New Jersey and New York. To take a particular account of all the Ravages and devastations would be endless,...
The irregularity of the post, occasioned by the frost, prevented my hearing with certainty what the Assembly of this State had done with the Potomac Bill until yesterday. I have now the pleasure to inform you that they have adopted the one which passed your Legislature, & come to similar resolutions respecting the road of communication with the river Cheat, & the application to the State of...
I am favd with yours of Yesterday. Colo. Richardsons Battalion was left in Maryland by order of Congress to keep the disaffected in the lower Counties in order, if their presence was necessary before, it is certainly much more so now. The Enemy are in want of many necessaries, with which those people would undoubtedly supply them if a watch is not kept over them—I do not therefore think myself...
I have been duly honored with your letter dated in Philadelphia, accompanied by one from the Marqs de la Fayette and another from the Marqs de Bouille. Whensoever your affairs will induce you to make the visit you propose to Virginia, I shall be happy to be favored with your company at Mount Vernon and to bestow the attentions due to your merits and their recommendations. I take the liberty of...
Mr Pinkney will do me the favor of presenting this letter to you —He is a Gentleman of fortune, family & character in South Carolina—A member of Congress, and delegate to the Fœderal Convention, now sitting in this City. As he proposes to visit your Country I take this liberty of introducing him to your acquaintance and attentions—and this I do with pleasure⟨.⟩ I persuade myself that you will...
I had the honor to receive a short letter from you by Majr L’Enfant —My official letters to the Counts D’Estaing & Rochambeau (which I expect will be submitted to the members of the Society of the Cincinnati in France) will inform you of the proceedings of the Genl Meeting held at Philada on the 3d inst:; & of the reasons which induced a departure from some of the original principles and rules...
I am your debtor for two letters—one of the 12th of Decemr—the other of the 8th of April. Since the receipt of the first, I have paid my respects to you in a line by Majr Swan; but as it was introductory only of him, it requires an apology, rather than entitles me to a credit in our epistolary correspondence. If I had as good a nack my dear Marquis, as you have at saying handsome things, I...
In reading your very friendly and acceptable letter of the 21st of December 1787, which came to hand by the last mail, I was, as you may well suppose, not less delighted than surprised to come across that plain American word—“my wife.” A wife! well my dear Marquis, I can hardly refrain from smiling to find you are caught at last. I saw, by the eulogium you often made on the happiness of...
You have taken a most effectual method of obliging me to accept your Cask of Claret—as I find, by your ingenious manner of stating the case, that I shall, by a refusal, bring my patriotism into question, and incur a suspicion of want of attachment to the French Nation, and of regard to you wch of all things I wish to avoid I will not enter into a discussion of the point of divinity, as I...
Although I know you are well acquaited with Mr Gouverneur Morris yet finding he was about to embark for France, I thought it might not be unacceptable for you to hear from me, and of the wellfare of my connections, by a person for whom I entertain so good a regard. Besides I thought I should have a convenient opportunity of addressing the Compliments of Mrs Washington and myself, to you, to...
I am much obliged to you for apprehending & sending One of the Persons who caused the disturbance last night under Guard—He shall be confined & properly examined—Be assured, Sir, every Measure, shall be adopted to preserve good Order & prevent a repetition of the like outrages in future. With perfect respect & esteem I am DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Accept my congratulation on yr safe arrival at New Port in good health, after traversing so much of the American theatre of War—and my thanks for your obliging favor of the 12th making mention thereof, & introductory of the Count de Charlus, whose agreeable Countenance, alone, is a sufficient index to the amiable qualities of his Mind, & does not fail, at first view—to make favourable...
This letter will be handed to you by Mr Rutledge, Son to Govr Rutledge of So. Carolina—a young Gentleman of merit who is about to visit France. It is so long since a letter has passed between us, that I am not at this moment, able to determin which of us is the Debtor, nor is it essential as the only purpose of the present trouble is to introduce Mr Rutledge to your Civilities and to present...
I have had the honor to receive your favor of the 23d of August from L’Orient. I hope this Letter will find you in the circle of your friends at Paris, well recovered from the fatigues of your long & wearisome inspection on the frontiers of the Kingdom. I am at length become a private citizen of America, on the banks of the Potowmac; where under my own Vine & my own Fig tree—free from the...
The Marqs de la Fayette, who I had been long looking for with the eyes of friendship and impatience, arrived here on Tuesday last and presented me your favor of the 16th of June. I thank you My Dr Sir, for every testimony of your recollection of me, and every fresh assurance you give me of the continuation of your friendship is pleasing: it serves (to borrow an Indian phraze) to brighten the...
Permit me, on this first occasion of writing to you, to begin my letter with congratulations on your recovered health, & I offer them sincerely. Colo. Menonville put into my hands two days since, your favor of the 29th Ulto—If my inclination was seconded by the means, I should not fail to treat this Gentleman as the friend of my friend—and if it is not in my power to comply with his wishes on...
The affectionate expressions in your last farewell letter of the 8th of Jany from Annapolis gave a new spring to the pleasing remembrance of our past Intimacy—and your Letter of the 4th of March from Paris, has convinced me that time not distance can eradicate the Seeds of friendship when they have taken root in a good Soil & are nurtured by Philanthropy & benevolence—That I value your esteem,...
The Count Rochambeau is just arrived at my Home—I propose to halt here Tomorrow with the Gentlemen, to ease their fatigue, & to give them fresh Spirits to pursue our March the next Day. It will add exceedingly my Dear Sir, to the Pleasure I experience in havg the Company of the Count at my Home, to have the Happiness to see you at the same Time—I beg therefore that you will be so good as to...
I fear, from the purport of the letter you did me the honor to write from N. Port on the 9th, that my sentiments respecting the Council of War held on board the Duke de Burgoyne the 31st of May have been misconceiv’d—and I shall be very unhappy if they receive an interpretation different from the true intent & meaning of them. If this is the case, it can only be attributed to my not...
I arrived, my dear Chevalr, at these my Quarters in the fore noon of yesterday; after passing over very bad roads & riding thro very foul weather without any damage—I must again give vent to that sensibility wch your goodness has impressed me with—and again thank you for all those civilities which your politeness heaped up on me at Rhode Island—I shall be greateful for them—& shall wish for...
I cannot suffer your old acquaintance Mrs Custis to proceed to Williamsburg without taking with her a remembrance of my friendship for You. I have been detaind here by Congress to Assist in making the necessary Arrangements for next campaign, and am happy to find so favourable a disposition in that body to prepare vigorously for it. They have resolv’d to keep up the same number of Corps as...
I have not had the honor of a line from you, since the 4th of march last, but I will ascribe my disappointment to any cause, rather than to a decay of your friendship. Having the appearance, & indeed the enjoyment of peace, without a final declaration of it; I, who am only waiting for the ceremonials, or ’till the British forces shall have taken leave of New York, am placed in an awkward and...
I cannot omit to seize the earliest occasion, to acknowledge the receipt of the very affectionate letter you did me the honor of writing to me on the 22d of May; as well as to thank you for the present of your Travels in America and the Translation of Colonel Humphreys’ Poem, all of which came safely to hand by the same conveyance. Knowing as I did, the candour liberality & philanthropy of the...
I felt too much to express anything, the day I parted with you; A Sense of your public Services to this Country, & gratitude for your private friendship, quite overcame me at the moment of our seperation—But I should be wanting to the feelings of my heart, & should do violence to my inclination, was I to suffer you to leave this Country without the warmest assurances of an affectionate regard...
I love & thank you for the Sentiments contained in your letter of the 5th—I look forward with pleasure, to the Epocha which will place us as conveniently in one camp, as we are congenial in our sentiments—I shall embrace you when it happens with the warmth of perfect friendship. My time, during my Winter residence in Philadelphia, was unusually (for me) divide between parties of pleasure, &...
By the Post I had the honor to receive the letter which you did me the favor to write to me on the 19th of last month, together with those of the Chevr De la Luzerne & the Baron de Viominel. I pray you to be assured Sir, that I shall have great pleasure in seeing you at this Seat on your way to Charleston. Your own merit is sufficient alone to entitle you to every attention from me; but the...
I have been favored with your letter of the 25th of September—I should with the greatest pleasure have complied with your Wishes respecting the exchange of Capt. Segond, could I have gratified them without deviating from a Rule which I have always observed, and without infringing a positive order of Congress which directs that no Officer shall be exchanged out of his turn. I flatter myself...
I yesterday recd yours of the 15th March with a general Return of the Ordnance, Arms and military Stores at Springfield. I beg you will be as industrious as possible in getting the new Arms cleaned and put in order, and having all the old that are worth repairing made fit for service. You need not wait untill the whole are compleated, but keep sending them forward as they are finished. I am...
Yours of the 3d Instt has been duly received. Your business to Boston seems to have been of a material and necessary nature, and I am happy to hear you were likely to get it accomodated. As the present time is peculiarly interesting, and requires the attention and exertion of every person in the line of duty assigned him, I must request your constant attendance and closest application & care...