You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Washington, George

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George"
Results 27701-27750 of 32,396 sorted by date (ascending)
In a letter which I wrote to you on friday last, I acknowledged the receipt of yours of the 22d, and informed you that I should again write as on this day, by the Post, who would also be the bearer of the materials for the Bolting Chest. The latter is accordingly sent, directed to the care of the Post Master in Alexandria, and hope it will be in time for the Work of Mr Ball. In my last, I...
The enclosed for Mr. Young , I pray you to put under cover to Mr. Johnson—the other for Mr. Vaughan may go in like manner, or otherwise, as you may think best;—both however by the Packet. The letter for Mr. Carroll I also return—besides which, were you to write a line or two to Mr. Johnson, addressed to the care of the Postmaster in Baltimore, it might be a mean of giving him earlier notice of...
Now Know ye, that the President of the United States of America having seen and considered the said contract, hath ratified and confirmed, & by these presents doth ratify & confirm the same and every article thereof. In testimony whereof he has caused the seal of the U.S. to be affixed to these presents, and signed the same with his hand. Done at the City of Philadelphia the first day of...
Letter not found: to John Greenwood, 4 Sept. 1791. Greenwood wrote GW on 10 Sept. that “I Received yours dated the 4th by the hand of sr John Jays son.”
The indisposition, and consequent absence from Mount Vernon of my Nephew, Majr Washington, to whom the care of my private business is entrusted, makes it indispensably necessary for me to go home before the meeting of Congress. My stay there will be longer or shorter according to circumstances —but it cannot exceed the middle of October, as I must be back before the meeting of that Body. Will...
Your letter of the 29th of last month came duly to hand, with the report of the preceeding week, and I am sorry to find by them that the weather had become dry again, but as we have had some fine rain here in the course of last week —as it is now raining, and has been doing so near twelve hours—and has all the appearances of a general rain, I hope in your next to hear, that you have...
I have had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 22nd of march last. Being indisposed on the day when Monsieur de Combourg called to deliver your letter I did not see him—and I understood that he set off for Niagara on the next day. The interesting state of affairs in France has excited the sympathy and engaged the good wishes of our citizens, who will learn with great pleasure that the...
I have had the pleasure to receive the letter which you were so good as to write to me from Berlin on the 26 of April. The favorable sentiments which you express of our country and its councils are very agreeable to me—The kind interest which you take in my personal happiness excites a grateful sensibility. You will learn with pleasure that events have realised the most sanguine hopes of our...
I have the pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of your letters of the 31st of January, and 10 of March last, and to express my obligations to your flattering and friendly assurances of regard. The interest which you are so good as to take in the welfare of the United States makes the communication of their prosperity to you, a most agreeable duty. You will learn with pleasure that events have...
I have received your letter of the 10. of August —and am very sorry to find that so far as it relates to my property under your care, I have no further satisfaction than the assurance which you have given in all the letters received from you, that I shall have a statement of my interest committed to your care—But Sir, I surely had a right to expect something more than the promise of a...
I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 30th of May by the hands of Monsieur de Ternant. and I beg you will be assured that I have a proper sense of the very polite and obliging manner in which you are pleased to express your personal regard for me. The manner in which you speak of M. de Ternant is highly honorable to him—and, from his talents, discretion, and proper views, united...
I have heard of the death of your promising Son with great concern, and sincerely condole with you and Mrs Knox on the melancholy occasion. Parental feelings are too much alive in the moment of these misfortunes to admit the consolations of religion or philosophy; but I am persuaded reason will call one or both of them to your aid as soon as the keenness of your anguish is abated. He that gave...
Letter not found: to Frances Ramadge, 9 Sept. 1791. The receiver’s copy of Ramadge’s letter of 22 Aug. to GW was docketed: “Ansd 9 Sept.”
The lively interest which I take in your welfare, my dear Sir, keeps my mind in constant anxiety for your personal safety amidst the scenes in which you are perpetually engaged. Your letter of the 6th of June by Monsieur de Ternant gave me that pleasure which I receive from all your letters, which tell me that you are well—But from the account you there gave it did not appear that you would be...
In acknowledging the receipt of your letter of the 15 of May, which reached me but a few days ago, I cannot forbear to express the sensibility with which I receive those warm effusions of personal attachment and respectful remembrance which are contained in it. and at the same time I beg you will be assured that I reciprocate them with truth and sincerity. As the happiness of the french Nation...
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 10 Sept. 1791. Randolph wrote to GW on Monday, 12 Sept. , of “your communication to me on Saturday last.”
I have been duly favored with your letter of the 6th instant. The indisposition and consequent (unexpected) absence of my Nephew from Mount Vernon, to whom my concerns there are entrusted, will oblige me to visit that estate before the meeting of Congress. Thursday I propose to leave this city, and on Sunday afternoon expect to arrive in Baltimore—I shall come provided with 1172 ⅔ dollars for...
Your letter of the 27th of may with its enclosures came duly to hand. During my absence on my late southern tour the proposals of Messrs Schweizer and Jeannerett, made their appearance here, as well through Mr Otto, Chargé des Affaires of France, to the Secretary of State, as through Mr Short, to the Secretary of the Treasury—In pursuance of certain arrangements, made previous to my departure,...
Your letter of yesterday was presented to me this day—but at a time when I was in conversation with a Gentleman on business. I embrace the first moment of leisure to acknowledge the receipt of it, and to add assurances of my belief that the account given by Mr Sheuber of his leaving the british service, and bringing letters to me whilst my quarters were at Rocky Hill is true. I have some...
[ Philadelphia ] September 14, 1791 . Discusses the possibility of the British establishing a post south of Lake Champlain. Df , in the handwriting of H, RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters, 1790–1799, National Archives. Clinton was governor of New York.
Your letter of the 7th instant, with its inclosure, did not reach me ’till yesterday. The intelligence, it communicates, is of a nature both serious and important. Indeed, the step it announces, as about to be taken by the British, would be one so extraordinary in every view, as to justify a question, whether the indications, which are alleged to have been given, have not rather proceeded from...
Three letters of yours—two bearing the 16th and the other the 25. of August are just come to hand—Your former letters in July have also been received. The Secretary of war will write to you on the subject of Indian affairs—and the Secretary of State will do the same on the business which respects the Negroes, when he returns from the visit he is now making to his family in Virginia. It falls...
Whilst I was in Wilmington waiting breakfast to day, I made the best enquiry time & circumstances would permit, for some fit character to fill the office lately held by Doctr. Latimer. Several persons were mentioned, but the weight of information was in favor of one Andrew Barratt. He was spoken of by Mr. Vining as a man of respectable character, of decision and temper. He now is, or lately...
Whilst I was in Wilmington waiting breakfast to day, I made the best enquiry time & circumstances would permit, for some fit character to fill the office lately held by Doctr Latimer. Several persons were mentioned, but the weight of information was in favor of one Andrew Barratt. He was spoken of by Mr Vining as a man of respectable character, of decision and temper. He now is, or lately has...
No. 28. Dear Sir, MOUNT VERNON, Septr. 23d. 1791. Your letter of the 18th. with the Gazettes came duly to hand, and I wish you to forward the latter (such as were sent last) by Wednesday’s and Friday’s Post; in which case they will arrive in Alexandria, on Mondays and Fridays when I shall have a messenger at the Post-Office in readiness to receive them. Accompany the papers with occurrencies...
I have received your letter of the 22d. inst: enclosing a copy of one from the French Minister; I have to inform you, that your proceedings with respect to the request of the Minister of France, meet my entire approbation. I am Sir   Your hble Servt. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Jean Baptiste de Ternant to H, September 21, 1791 .
Since my last to you I have received your two letters of the 21st instant—one dated in the morning, and the other in the evening of that day. What appeared to you to be the object of the formal enquiries of Mr Powell and the Mayor of the City, in their late interrogatories? Did they mean to convict Mr Gallatine of mis-representation—or me of an improper interference in the building of a House...
Your letter of the 24th. ulto., (enclosing a letter from Govr. St. Clair, and sundry papers relating to the subject of the settlements which have been made under purchases from Judge Symmes) I have duly received. The Secretary of State, as well as I recollect, has already written both to Govr. St. Clair & Judge Symmes on this subject; but whether he has or has not, it can make no material...
Your letter of the 6th ultimo found me at this place—but not until it had travelled to Philadelphia and back again. As I never entertained a suspicion of your having any intention to impose upon me by a misrepresentation of the assets of your Father’s estate—So you and your good Mother may rest assured that I have no disposition to contribute to her distresses by withdrawing from her the use...
Your letter of the 24th ulto, (enclosing a letter from Govr St Clair, and sundry papers relating to the subject of the settlements which have been made under purchases from Judge Symmes) I have duly received. The Secretary of State, as well as I recollect, has already written to both Govr. St Clair & Judge Symmes on this subject; but whether he has or has not, it can make no material...
Nothing at present occurs to me of which I have to inform you, except that since the rect of your letter of the 22d ulto respecting the situation of affairs in the French Island of Hispaniola—your other letter of the 22d & that of the 24th of the same month, one giving an Accot of the Expedition under Gl Wilkinson—the other enclosing a Statemt of the Troops now on our frontiers, having been...
Since my last to you, which I think was written on this day week, I have received your letters of the 25th and 27th Ulto. I am not yet enabled to speak decisively with respect to the Blankets. Many have arrived, but are not yet opened, in Alexandria. Mr Wilson, who has imported of them largely, at from 56/. to 75/. Sterg pr piece of 15 blankets; has offered them to me at 70 prCt but as he...
(Private) Sir, Mount Vernon October 2nd 1791. The details with which you have been pleased to favor me (under date of 24th ult.) of the unfortunate insurrection of the negroes in Hispaniola, came duly to hand; and I pray you to accept my best thanks for the trouble you have taken to give them. What the final issue of this affair may be is difficult at this distance, and with the imperfect...
[ Mount Vernon, October 7, 1791. On October 11, 1791, Hamilton wrote to Washington : “The Post of this day has brought me your letter of the 7th. instant.” Letter not found. ]
Your letter of the 30th Ulto came duly to hand, with the enclosures. I have had Samples of the Alexandria Blankets sent me—the quality of them is not good; inferior to those I had from Watson—& far, very far indeed, inferior to those which I used to import myself. The prices, length & breadth of three kinds, are enclosed. Messrs Sitgreaves, give no length to their Blankets—and if Colo. Biddle...
Your letter of the 30th. September enclosing a Contract entered into by the Collector of Wilmington in North Carolina with James McStephens & Henry Toomer for the stakage of the shoals of Cape Fear river, I have duly received. As I approve of the Contract, I have transmitted the same with my approbation to the Collector of Wilmington. I wrote to you from the head of Elk, informing you of my...
Your letter of the 30th September enclosing a Contract entered into by the Collector of Wilmington in North Carolina with James McStephens & Henry Toomer for the stakage of the shoals of Cape Fear river, I have duly received. As I approve of the Contract, I have transmitted the same with my approbation to the Collector of Wilmington. I wrote to you from the head of Elk, informing you of my...
Your letter of the 1st inst: I have duly recd—likewise one of the 4th, covering a letter from the Secretary of the Treasury together with some communications from Lt Colo. Beckwith. I herewith transmit you an Address & Memorial of the Officers, Civil & Military, of the District of Miro, which was sent to me by Govr Blount—I wish you to take the same into your consideration, & make a Report...
Your letters of the 2d & 5th came to my hands on Saturday morning. Yesterday I allotted to acknowledge the rect of them & to write several letters; but company coming in before breakfast, and from thence till dinner, and an early succession again to day—I can do no more than say they came duly to hand, and approve of your getting the Rooms (mentioned in your letter of the 2d) Painted—The...
Letter not found: to James Madison, 10 Oct. 1791. Sold by Stan V. Henkels, 1892, catalog 694, item 63.
By the Post of Friday, I received your communications of the first instant; and from the character of Mr Campbell am glad to hear he is disposed to act as Attorney for the District of Virginia; & that you had forwarded the Commission to him for that purpose. Also, that a pardon had been sent to Saml Dodge as it appears that his errors were unintentional. It is my wish & desire that you would...
Letter not found. 10 October 1791, Mount Vernon. Listed in Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 694 (1892). The list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany) mentions a letter of this date from Washington to an unspecified correspondent and notes that it “Relates to house repairs.”
When I addressed a private letter to you a few days ago I had no more idea that Monday the 24th. instt. was the day appointed for the meeting of Congress, than I had of its being dooms-day until it was mentioned to me in a letter which I have just received from Mr. Lear (who was under the like mistake). It had taken such deep root in my mind that the last monday in the month was the time that...
(Private) My dear Sir, Mount Vernon Octr 14th 1791 When I addressed a private letter to you a few days ago I had no more idea that monday the 24th instt was the day appointed for the meetings of Congress, than I had of its being dooms-day until it was mentioned to me in a letter which I have just received from Mr Lear (who was under the like mistake). It had taken such deep root in my mind...
With pleasure I received your letter of the 9th, and am obliged by the communications therein contained. 1 have written regularly to Mr Lear once a week, some times oftener, on business; but can do little more than drop him or you a line by this Post, as the unexpected discovery that the 24th, instead of the 31st instt is the day appointed for the meeting of Congress, obliges me to bestow...
(Private) My dear Sir, Mount Vernon Octr 14th 1791. I have been under a strange mistake with respect to the time appointed for the meeting of Congress, and a distressing one; inasmuch as I shall have but little time after my arrival in Philadelphia to receive, & digest the thoughts which may have occurred to the heads of Departments, with those of my own, into proper form for communication, or...
Your letter of the 9th was forwarded to me yesterday morning by the Post-Master in Alexandria (having sent no person to that place the evening before). I am glad of the intimation given of the intentions of the Minister of France; and pleased, tho’ distressed at the same time, at the information that, the 24th instt is the day fixed on for the meeting of Congress. I had no more idea of this...
Enclosed is a letter for Mr Muse, requesting him to put my papers into your hands, and to give you such information with respect to the business, as is necessary to bring you acquainted with the present state of it—After you have read the letter, and noticed the contents, seal and deliver it to him. Receive from Mr Muse all the blank leases with which I have furnished him, as well as those...
I am thus far on my way to Philadelphia, and if the disagreeableness of the weather (for it is now raining) does not prevent it, shall proceed to Bladensburgh at least to night; but be my dispatch what it probably may, the mail which leaves this tomorrow, will arrive in Philadelphia before me. This being the case, and time pressing, I forward the enclosed suggestions of Mr. Jefferson and Mr....
I am thus far on my way to Philadelphia, and if the disagreeableness of the weather (for it is now raining) does not prevent it, shall proceed to Bladensburgh at least to night; but be my dispatch what it probably may, the mail which leaves this tomorrow, will arrive in Phialdelphia before me. This being the case, and time pressing, I forward the enclosed suggestions of Mr Jefferson and Mr...