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    • Washington, George
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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Wayne, Anthony"
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As you are appointed in the Arrangement of the Army to command a Brigade of Pensylvania Troops, I desire, that you will hold yourself in readiness and repair to my Head Quarters, as soon, as a General Officer arrives at the post where you now command. Your presence here, will be materially wanted, and I persuade myself, you will lose no time in complying with my requisition, when the...
I wrote to you the 12th Ultimo, desiring, that so soon as any other General Officer should arrive at Tionderoga, you would immediately leave it and repair to my Head Quarters. I must now repeat that desire, as your presence here is very much wanted; and I shall expect, that after the receipt of this, you will hasten to join me with all the expedition you can. The Troops from Pennsylvania are...
Major Campbell advises by Letter just now received that the Enemy are advancing toward Van Vacter’s Bridge. I wish you to send out fresh scouts immediately, and to make the earliest reports. If this report is confirmed by your scouts you will order your Tents to be struck, and put into the Waggons, and have everything in readiness to move. I am Sir yr mt hume servt LS , addressed to Wayne, in...
The Fleet have gone out of the Hook and as Delaware appears to be the most probable destination, I desire you will leave your Brigade under the next in command and proceed yourself immediately to Chester in Pennsylvania where your presence will be necessary to arrange the Militia who are to rendezvous there. Genl Mifflin is just gone off to Philada. I am Sir Yr most obt Servt LS , in Tench...
I wish thro’ you, Sir, to return my thanks to the Pennsylvania Officers, who subscribed the Memorial you delivered me a few days since, for the obliging sentiments they are pleased to entertain of me—At the same time, you will inform them, that I am fully sensible of the justice, in which their Complaint respecting the exorbitant price of Goods & Necessaries is founded, and that I painfully...
As I have receiv’d Information that the Enemy have turn’d down that Road from the White Horse which leads to Swedes Ford on Schuylkill I have to desire that you will Halt your Troops wherever this Meets you if coming this way & set them to Cleaning their Arms drawing Ammunition & Cooking Provision. I must call your utmost Exertion in fitting yourselves in the best manner you can for following...
I have this Instt recd yours of ½ after 3 Oclock —having wrote twice to you already to move forward upon the Enemy, I have but little to add—Genl Maxwell & Potter are order’d to do the same (being at Pottss Forge)—I could wish you & those Genl would act in conjunction, to make your advances more formidable but I would not have too much time delayed on this Acct. I shall follow as speedily as...
Letter not found: to Brig. Gen. Anthony Wayne, 20 Sept. 1777. Wayne wrote GW on 21 Sept. : “Whilst I am writing I received yours of the 20th.”
Letter not found: to Brig. Gen. Anthony Wayne, 21 Sept. 1777. GW wrote Wayne on 23 Sept. : “I received Your favor of Yesterday morning, and am apprehensive, as you have not acknowledged the receipt of a Letter, I wrote you the Night before, that It has fallen into the Enemy’s hands.”
I received Your favor of Yesterday morning, and am apprehensive, as you have not acknowledged the receipt of a Letter, I wrote you the Night before, that It has fallen into the Enemy’s hands. By that, I directed Genl Smallwood & Yourself to march immediately with your Respective Corps by the way of Pots Grove to join me. You will both pursue the Line thereby marked out & which I have mentioned...
Letter not found: to Brig. Gen. Anthony Wayne, 22 Nov. 1777. A two-page letter in the writing of GW’s aide-de-camp Tench Tilghman and signed by GW was sold in 1935. It reads in part: “Altho’ it is not probable that the Enemy would give us notice of their intentions, I do not think it will be amiss to be in readiness. I would therefore have you put your Division under Arms by day Break and I...
I receiv’d your favor of Yesterday, & immediately sent one of my Aids to represent the Subject of it to the Commissary of Forage & Quartermaster Genl as far as it related to them—they declare that nothing of the Kind has happen’d within their knowledge, but say, they cannot be answerable for the conduct of many of their Deputies as they are not to be depended on, & it is out of their power to...
The good People of the State of Pennsa Living in the Vicinity of Philadelphia and near the Delaware River—having suffered much by the Enemy Carrying off their Property without allowing them any Compensation —thereby Destressing the Inhabitants—Supplying their own Army and Enabling them to protract the Cruel and unjust War that they are now Wageing against these States. And Whereas by Recent...
I was yesterday favd with yours of the 25th from Haddenfeild. The Cattle that you collect should cross the Delaware at Coryells Ferry, and then keep higher up the Country before they strike across. They should fall in with Schuylkill at Pottsgrove and cross the River there. A considerable escort should attend them. We lost a fine drove of 130 Head that were coming from New England a few days...
Yours of the 26th from Mount Holly came to hand last evening. I am pleased to hear that you had so good intelligence of the designs and motions of the Enemy that you were enabled to withdraw your detatchment from Haddonfeild before they invested it. Considering the disproportion of your strength to that of the Enemy all that can be expected of you is to wait upon and circumscribe them as much...
You will see by the inclosed Letter that your presence in Camp is essential to settling matters of importa⟨n⟩ce. you will therefore leave pr⟨oper⟩ instructions with the next in com⟨mand⟩ and return as speedily as p⟨ossible⟩ to Camp. I am Sir Your most obedt Servt LS , in John Laurens’s writing, anonymous donor. Where the document has been mutilated, the conjectured characters are supplied in...
I am favd with yours of the 14th: This will be delivered to you by Lieut. Peyton of Capt. Lees Troop who takes 12 Horse with him, which are all that are not upon command. I wrote to you a few days ago ⅌ Express desiring you to give the proper orders to the eldest Officer of your detatchment and to repair to Camp yourself as quick as possible as the Gentlemen of Congress want to see you much on...
You are to proceed with the first and second Pennsilvania and the brigade late Conways —by the direct route to Coryells Ferry—leaving a proper interval between your division and General Lees, so as to prevent their interfering with each other—the instructions given to General Lee, are to halt on the first strong ground after passing the Delaware at the said ferry—until farther orders—unless he...
Fishkill [ New York ] October 2, 1778 . Orders repair of road from Bulls Iron Works to Litchfield. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
You will send a proper fatigue party from your division, on the road leading from Bull’s Iron works to Litchfield to be employed in repairing the road, in case it should become necessary to march that way—The party will continue out ’till the purpose be completed; and measures must therefore be taken to supply them with provisions—Other similar parties are ordered on the other roads. You will...
You will be pleased to detach a Captain two Subs. and Fifty Men who are to lay at Robinsons Mills near Mahopack Pond till the Rear of the Pennsylvania Troops are about passing the North River, they are then to follow and join their respective Corps. The intention of this party is to prevent any of the Convention Troops, under pretence of desertion, from passing that way to New York. The...
I recd yours of Yesterday late last Evening. Genl Muhlenberg had directions not to move from his Ground untill the 2d division of the Convention Troops had passed the North River. This I imagine was effected on the 26th and that the Virginia Troops would march Yesterday Morning: If so, they will have passed you before this reaches you. If they should not, be pleased to send to Genl Muhlenberg...
I have just recd intelligence that the Enemy moved up the North River yesterday with 52 sail of Transports, and had proceeded this morning as far up as Closter which is above Fort Lee. What is their intent I do not know—I desire you will halt wherever this may find you—collect all your effective Men, and send your Baggage and Convalescents on towards Middle Brook. If you receive certain...
I have received your favor of the 10th inst. expressing your desire to have a command in the light Corps—My opinion of your merit will lead me chearfully to comply with your request, as soon as the Arrangement of the army, and other circumstances permit the formation of that Corps. The pennsilvania Barracks appear to be well constructed for the accommodation of the troops, and judiciously...
I was favd a few days ago with a letter from you by Mrs Yorke. I wish it had been in my power to have complied with your request, and that of several other Gentlemen, in her behalf, without infringing a Rule which I myself had just proposed to the executive powers of the several States, which was, not to permit any inhabitants of the States to go within the enemy’s lines without a...
I, a few days ago, recd the inclosed extract of a letter and Affidavits from Governor Livingston, which is all I know of the matter to which they relate. As the Governor has called upon me in so pointed a manner to support the Civil authority, I am obliged to request you and Capt. Fish-bourne to attend any time between this and the 1st of April agreeable to his requisition. I am exceedingly...
I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 16th Ulto some days ago, and should have acknowledged it before, if I had not been prevented by a multiplicity of business. From my desire to promote matters of your recommendation—and from the very favourable sentiments, which I entertain of Mr Mcpherson and Mr Archer, I should be happy it were in my power to return you such an Answer as you...
I request that you will join the Army as soon as you can. I wrote you upon this subject before we marched from Middle Brook, but as you have not arrived—It is probable my Letter has miscarried or that it did not come to hand till very lately. I am Dr Sir with great regard Yr Most Obedt servant LS , in Robert Hanson Harrison’s writing, PHi : Wayne Papers; Df , DLC:GW ; Varick transcript ,...
New Windsor [ New York ] July 1, 1779 . Asks Wayne to obtain information about British position at Stony Point and Verplanks Point. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
New Windsor [ New York ] July 1, 1779 . Has appointed Wayne “to the command of the light infantry of the line.” Authorizes Wayne to attack enemy if an opportunity arises. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Herewith you will be pleased to receive general instructions for your conduct—This you will consider as private & confidential. The importance of the two posts of Verplanks & Stoney points to the enemy is too obvious to need explanation. We ought if possible to dispossess them. I recommend it to your particular attention, without delay to gain as exact a knowledge as you can of the number of...
Having appointed you to the command of the Light infantry of the line, you will immediately repair to that part of it (consisting of four battalions now commanded by Colo. Butler) which is in the vicinity of Fort Montgomery, and take the command. The infantry of the other divisions is not yet organized; but it will be done as soon as possi⟨ble⟩ and the whole drawn together as far as the...
[ New Windsor, New York ] July 4, 1779 . Thanks Wayne for observations and sketch. Plans to be with Wayne tomorrow. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress.
New Windsor [ New York ] July 5, 1779 . Discusses provisions for clothing the infantry. Regrets that rum supply is low. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have received your letter of this day and have issued a General order for regulating the manner in which Cloathing is to be drawn for the Infantry—I have also directed a Briga⟨de⟩ Qr Master Forage Master & Conductor to be appointed. though I have not assigned the duty of Clothier to the first. If it should be found necessary it may be done hereafter. I have appointed the regimental Qr...
New Windsor [ New York ] July 9, 1779 . Asks Wayne to investigate the possibilities of an attack on Stony Point. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
While the enemy are making excursions to distress the country it has a very disagreeable aspect to remain in a state of inactivity on our part—The reputation of the army and the good of the service seem to exact some attempt from it—The importance of Stoney Point to the enemy makes it infinitely desireable that could be the object—The works are formidable; but perhaps on a fuller examination...
New Windsor [ New York ] July 10, 1779 . Sends instructions for attack on Stony Point. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Immediately upon receipt of your letter of this date I ordered the Q.M. Genl to furnish the Espontoons you wrote for, and presume you will get them in a day or two. My ideas of the enterprise in contemplation are these. That it should be attempted by the light Infantry only, which should march under cover of night and with the utmost secrecy to the enemys lines, securing every person they find...
New Windsor [ New York ] July 14, 1779 . Orders attack on Stony Point on following night unless Wayne wishes to defer it. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress.
I have reflected on the advantages and disadvantages of delaying the proposed attempt, and I do not know but the latter preponderate. You will therefore carry it into execution tomorrow night as you desire, unless some new motive or better information should induce you to think it best to defer it. You are at liberty to choose between the different plans on which we have conversed. But as it...
I request that you will transmit me as soon as possible—Returns of our killed and wounded in the attack on the night of the 15—also of the Enemys loss in killed—wounded & prisoners. Congress will be impatient to receive the particulars. I am Dr Sir with great regard Yr Most Obedt sert P.S. It will be necessary for you to transmit a formal report of your proceedings from the time of your march...
I observe in your Letter of the 16th of July by Mr Archer that you make particular mention of his intrepidity and firmness in the Assault on Stony point. Is it your wish that he should be the Bearer of my dispatches to Congress? His circumstances are peculiar—he has no appointment in the Army. It will be impossible to provide for him in any particular line; but perhaps he might obtain a Brevet...
Col. Butlers favor of last evening I have received—The opinion he has of the enemys designs renders it unnecessary for me to caution you on the score of keeping out the necessary Guards & patroles; The look out boats I have desired Genl McDougal to order down to be under yr command that you may officer & man them, with such persons as you can fully confide in —this will enable you to obtain...
Your favor of this date came duly to hand —I shall certainly not undertake any thing (capital) without your knowledge—I wish for your opinion as a friend—not as commanding Officer of the light Troops—whether another attempt upon Stoney point by way of surprize, is eligible—(In any other manner under present appearances, and information, no good, I am sure, can result from it). Lord Cornwallis...
I inclose you a Warrant on the Deputy pay Master General for Fifteen hundred Dollars to pay the rewards promised to the first five Men who should enter the Enemy’s works in the attack upon Stony point: Also f⟨or⟩ One Hundred & forty thousand Nine hundred & Twenty Eight Dollars & Eighty two ninetieths of a Dollar, being part of the value of the Stores taken there, the whole value of which the...
Your letter of yesterday reached me last night—I am obliged to you for the particular account you give me of Stoney Point. Col. Butler will be tried by a Court Martial of the line. Its decision whatever it may be will be less liable to exception than that of a Court composed wholly of the Officers of the Corps to which he belongs. His objection to being tried by the same Court which acquitted...
West Point, September 14, 1779. Discusses uniforms for the Light Infantry. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Your letter of this day is this moment received—I shall take pleasure in paying every attention to the comfort & convenience of the Light Infantry, which the nature of the service they perform may require and the establishment of the army permit, so far as may be consistent with propriety and the general good of the troops—But I do not think a compliance with Mr Measoms proposal would be...
I am this moment favored with your letter. Accounts received by deserters from Ver-planks-point and the report of a patrole this morning give me reason to believe that the enemy are at least about evacuating this post. You will not fail to give me the earliest information of what further movements you may discover. I am Dr Sir Your most hble svt LS , in James McHenry’s writing, PHi : Wayne...