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    • Washington, George
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    • Trumbull, Jonathan Sr.
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    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Trumbull, Jonathan Sr." AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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Allow me to return you my Sincerest thanks for the kind Wishes & favourable Sentiments exprss’d in yours of the 13th Instant: its the Cause of our Common Country calls us both to an Active & dangerous Duty, I trust that Divine Providence which wisely orders the Affairs of Men will enable us to discharge it with Fidelity & Success—The uncorrupted Choice of a brave & free People has raised you...
It is with no small Concern that I find the Arrangement of General Officers made by the Honourable Continental Congress has produced Dissatisfaction. As the Army is upon a general Establishment, their Right to controul & supersede a Provincial one must be unquestionable: and in such a Cause I should hope every Post would be deemed honourable which gave a Man Opportunity to serve his Country. A...
I am to Acknowlage your Favour of the 17th Inst. informing me of the Destination of the Troops raising in your Colony; As the season is now advanced & the Enemy considerably reinforced we have the utmost Reason to expect any Attack that may be made will not be much longer delayed—I should therefore think it hig[h]ly necessary the new raised Troops should join the Army with all possible...
I am favoured [with] yours of the 31st July informing me that the new Levies were coming forward with all Expedition; As the Enemy has lain longer inactive than I expected I hope they will arrive in Time to give us their Assistance. My Last Letter from the Honble Continental Congress recommends my procuring from the Colonies of Rode Island & Connecticut a Quantity of Tow Cloth for the Purpose...
From some late Intelligence out of Boston & sundry corroborating Circumstances, there is great Reason to suspect, that the Ministerial Troop intend either to make a Diversion to the Southward, or wholly to remove—If they should do either, it is most probable New York is the Place of their Destination; I therefore think it most Adviseable, that the Troop of your Colony who have not yet march’d,...
Your Favours of the 7th 8th & 12 Instant are all duly received. The Destination of the New Raised Levies has happily coincided with my Intentions respecting them—In the present Uncertainty I think it best they should continue where they are, and I hope the Officers will be assiduous in Discplining, & improving them in the use of Arms. Upon the Subject of Powder, I am at a Loss what to say, our...
Yesterday I received Advice from Boston that a Number of Transports, have sailed on a second Expidition for fresh Provisions: As they meet with such Success before, it is probable they may pursue the same Course only advancing further—We think Montague Point on Long Island a very probable Place of their Landing: I have therefore thought it best to give you the earliest Intelligence; But I do...
I am to acknowledge the Receipt of your Favour of the 21st Ult: with the Inclosures. By my last Letters from Ticonderoga, I expect a Quantity of Lead, will be forwarded soon to your Care from thence. In the mean Time, I am glad to hear there are such Prospects of a Supply of that Article, from the Mines in your Colony: I make no Doubt, they will receive such Encouragement both publick &...
Upon the Receipt of this you will please to give Directions that all the New raised Levies march Immediately for this Camp, By a Resolution of Congress the Troops on the Continental Establishment were not to be employed in the Defence of the Coasts or of any particular Province, the Militia being deemed competent for that Service: When I directed these Troops to remain in their own Province I...
Your Favour of the 6th Inst. is now before me, Our State of Ammunition disables us from availing ourselves of our present Stations as I would wish to do & requires every Assistance that can be given it: you will therefore on the Receipt of this be Pleased to forward Whatever can be spared from the Necessities of the Colony, And the more Expedition you can use the more acceptable it will be....
It gives me much concern to observe by yours of the 15th Instant that you should think it Necessary to distinguish between my personal & Publick Character & confine your Esteem to the former. Upon a Reperusal of Mine of the 8th Instant I cannot think the Construction you have made the Necessary one, & unless it was, I Should have hoped the Respect I really have, & which I Flattered myself I...
By a Person from Boston the Day before yesterday we learn that a small Fleet consisting of a 64 Gun Ship a 20, 2 Sloops of 18 Guns. 2 Transports & about 600 Men sailed as yesterday. They took on Board 2 Mortars, 4 Howitzers & other Artillery from which we suspect they intend to bombard some Town on the Coast. General Gage is recalled Genl How commands in his Place. We have some late Accounts...
Your favor of the 9th inst. has been duly received. The Fleet mentioned in mine of the 6th instant has been seen standing N.N.E. so that we presume it is destined against some town of this Province or New Hampshire, or possibly gone to Quebec —A Gentleman of character here from Canada assures me he will meet with no opposition there —I am sorry other avocations will deprive me of the pleasure...
The inclosed Information, being of the highest Importance, I thought it proper to transmit it to you with all Dispatch. I am Sir yr mo. Ob. Servt LB , in Edmund Randolph’s writing, DLC:GW ; Varick transcript , DLC:GW . The letter-book copy is addressed to Cooke and is followed by a note reading “A Letter in the same Words was written to Governor Trumbull of Connecticut.” Trumbull’s letter book...
Since I had the pleasure of addressing you last no material occurrence has happened in our Camp. Depy Governor Griswold was very desirous to take the minutes of the Conference with the Delegates of the Continental Congress, with him, but they were so lengthy the time did not admit of it—As soon as they can be copied fair they shall be transmitted. I was somewhat surprised to find, that in one...
I have been honored with your favor of the 30th ulto by Mr Trumbull —I sincerely wish this Camp could furnish a good Engineer—The Commisary Genl can inform you how excedingly deficient the Army is of Gentlemen skilled in that branch of business; and that most of the works which have been thrown up for the defence of our several Encampments have been planned by a few of the principal Officers...
I received your favor of the 6th inst. in which you give a detail of Dr Chiney’s case as it appeared before you and Council, in which nothing but the fair side of his character appears. You may be assured Sir that his tryal will be impartial, that no insidious designs of his inemies will have weight, and that it will give me much plasure to find he can acquit himself of the crimes he is...
The reason of my giving you the trouble of this, is the late extraordinary and reprehensible conduct of some of the Connecticut Troops—Some time ago, apprehending that they, or part of them might be inclined to go home when the time of their inlistment should be up, I applied to the Officers of the several Regiments, to know whether it would be agreeable to the men to continue till the first...
“I beg leave to recommend to your kind notice Monsieurs Pennet and De Pliarne two French Gentlemen who came here last night. . . . I pray the favor of you to supply them with such necessaries as they may want and have Carriages provided for expediting their journey as much as possible.” LB , Ct : Trumbull Papers; LB , DLC:GW ; Varick transcript , DLC:GW . This letter is very similar in wording...
Your favors of the 7th and 9th instant I received, and was much pleased to hear of the zeal of the people of Connecticut & the readiness of the inhabitants of the several Towns to march to this Camp, upon their being acquainted with the behaviour and desertion of their Troops. I have nothing to suggest for the consideration of your Assembly; I am convinced that they will not be wanting in...
I yesterday received the inclosed information from several persons, who lately came out of Boston, which, I thought it my duty, to transmit to you —Whether these Troops are embarked I cannot undertake to say; but if they are it is more than probable, that their destination may be very different from what they gave out in Boston, and that that was only used as a feint—It is certain that several...
Your favor of the 1st inst. I received and heartily thank you for your kind salutations—I was happy to hear of the great unanimity in your Assembly and of the several salutary Laws they passed, which shew them to be well attached to the Common Cause, and to have taken proper measures for supporting it. Inclosed you have the account of the lead from Crown Point agreeable to your request —The...
The alarming and almost defenceless state of our Lines, occasioned by the slow progress in raising men for the New Army and the departure of a great number of the Militia which had been called in for their support, till the 15th inst. from this and New-Hampshire Governments, rendered it necessary for me to summon the General Officers in Council, to determine on proper measures to be adopted...
Your favor of the 18th inst. I received this day, for which I return you my thanks. Upon receiving the melancholy intelligence of the Fall of the Brave Montgomery and the repulse of our Troops in their attempt against the City of Quebec, I called a Council of Genl Officers to determine upon the necessary steps to be taken upon the alarming Occasion—Of their determination I wrote you yesterday,...
In the hurry of my last dispatches to you of the 19th inst. I forgot to intimate, that for the encouragement of the Regiment destined for Canada, a months advanced pay will be allowed Officers and Men, by me, in behalf of the Congress—At the same time I think it but right that you should be apprized of the intention of this Government to advance their Regiment another months pay to enable them...
I received your favor of the 22d instant, and am much obliged by your assurance, that the three Regiments of Militia for this Camp will be raised as fast as possible—They are much wanted—I wish it was in my power to facilitate their march by rendering a necessary supply of money for it, but it is not, as our Treasury is exhausted—I hope in a little time it will be replenished with a sufficient...
I last night received intelligence of the arrival of some powder in your Colony by the Sloop Macarone, and the report is that she brought Arms too—As my last letters from Philadelphia do not promise me hopes of an immediate supply of those necessaries, and as the exigency of this Army, at this particular crisis, calls for much more than what we have, I must beg the favor of you to interest...
I received your favors of the 2d and 5th instant, and agreeable to your request have ordered payment of the ballance of the expences attending the journey of the two French Gentlemen to Philadelphia to be made William Bacon Post-Rider, for your use, which I hope will come safe to hand. I am happy to hear of your having received 12,500 Dollars from the Honble Congress for the Troops going upon...
Your favor of the 12th instant I received, and beg leave to inform you, that I should have most certainly contrived to, and have spared you some money for the Troops going to Canada, pressing as the demands against me were, had I not been advised of the supply sent you by Congress for that purpose. I shall be glad to know, whether, when I pay the Militia from your Government, I am to give...
I am grieved to find, that instead of six or eight thousand weight of Powder which I fondly expected to receive from Providence (agreeable to your letter) that I am likely to get only 4217 lbs. including the 3,000 wt belonging to this Province, if to be had —My Situation, in respect to this article, is really distressing; and while common prudence obliges me to keep my want of it concealed, to...