You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Washington, George
  • Recipient

    • Rochambeau, Jean-Baptiste …
  • Period

    • Revolutionary War

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Rochambeau, Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 1-10 of 128 sorted by author
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I have had the honor of receiving your Excellency’s and the Chevalier des Touche’s joint letter of the 25th and your own of the 26th. The absence of your light Frigates renders the plan which Major Tallmadge proposed impracticable for the present. We will, however, keep the enterprise in view, and may, perhaps, at some future time, find an opportunity of carrying it into execution with...
I have the honor to congratulate Your Excellency on the safe arrival of the Viscount De Rochambeau at the Court of Versailles. My authority is derived from the President of Congress who in a letter of the 14th instant writes me thus. "By letters just come to hand from Mr Carmichael at Madrid, I am informed that the son of Count De Rochambeau is safe arrived in France"—I hope every thing...
I was yesterday honored with your Excellencys favor of the 10th Inst. I am extremely sorry to hear of the loss at the Diligente—The Chevalier Clonard appears to have done every thing that could have been expected from an active intelligent Officer. In a former Letter I expressed my approbation of the exchange of a number of the British Convalescents left a Gloucester for those taken in the...
My last to Your Excellency was on the 16th inst. I have since that received information that an embarkation has taken place at New York—It is said to consist of three British Regiments and a detachment of Hessian Grenadiers. They may have sailed by this time, but of this I have no certain accounts. They are to be convoyed by two Ships of the Line and two or three Frigates. It is conjectured...
I had the honor of writing you the 12th instant approving the demand you intended to make to your count for an augmentation of your siege artillery to double the present quantity—I have since received your letter of the 8th. The season is so far advanced that I think you cannot too soon make the dispositions you propose for winter quarters, which are as agreable to me as they are judicious—I...
Agreeable to my promise I now inclose to your Excellency the Route by Coriell’s Ferry—the particular Stages & Distances I have noted, from which you will form your own Estimation for each Days march. I was yesterday favored with a Philadelphia paper of the 30th of July, wch mentions the Arrival of 13 Ships of the Line 2 frigates & a Cat under Comd of Monr Va u dreuil at the Capes of...
I am honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 28th ulto. I flatter myself the Count de Barras will meet with no interruption upon his passage, as I have reason to think the British Fleet are off the Hook. I have deferred writing to your Excellency, in hopes that I should have been able to have learnt, with certainty, whether there was any thing in the report which General St Clair forwarded...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 31st ulto. Your remarks upon the uncertainty of operations which depend upon a combination of Land and sea Forces, except there is a decisive superiority over the enemy as to the latter, are judicious, and consonant to the Ideas which I had ever entertained upon the subject. Upon maturely considering the offer which your Excellency has...
I have been successively honored with your letters of the 13th 16th and 19th of Octobr. I think the change you have made respecting Lauzun’s cavalry will be an advantageous one. Since my last, we have accounts both by way of Statia and New York that the Combined fleets consisting of thirty sail of the line off Cape Finisterre, fell in with an outward bound fleet and took fifty odd sail of...
I have received Your Excellency’s favor of the 6th. I have no intelligence of Admiral Arbuthnots arrival at New York or at Sandy Hook—perhaps he may be standing at a greater distance from the Land than heretofore, to avoid the gales of wind which may be commonly expected upon the coast at this season—I received the following from New York yesterday, whether the men of War alluded to were the...