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Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 7, 1777. Orders release of “Mr. Smith” who had been acting as a spy for the Americans and was mistakenly arrested by Major General Benjamin Lincoln. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Joseph Reed had resigned as adjutant general and was residing in Philadelphia as a private citizen.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] April 26, 1779 . Announces postponement of Major General Benedict Arnold’s trial. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Reed was president of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] April 27, 1779 . Discusses arrangements for Major General Benedict Arnold’s trial. Regrets that only a small amount of Pennsylvania Militia will be available for Indian expedition. Discusses defense of Pennsylvania border. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 8, 1779 . Discusses plans for Major General Benedict Arnold’s trial. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 15, 1779 . Requests date of Major General Benedict Arnold’s trial. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 20, 1779 . States that if expected number of men are raised in Pennsylvania, it will not be necessary to call out militia. Is pleased that the date has finally been set for Major General Benedict Arnold’s trial. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Smiths Clove [ New York ] June 14, 1779 . Encloses return of Pennsylvania battalions. States that Major General Benedict Arnold’s trial has been postponed. Sends news of enemy movements. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
New Windsor [ New York ] July 5, 1779 . Asks for reinforcements for Major General John Sullivan. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] February 15, 1780 . Thanks Reed for “announcing my election as a member of the Philosophical society.” Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Reed was president of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania and a member of the American Philosophical Society.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] May 28, 1780 . Discusses the “circumstances of our allies as well as our own” and emphasizes necessity of cooperation with France. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
[ Springfield, New Jersey ] June 16, 1780 . Asks Reed to send on the “city light horse.” Df , in writings of Richard Kidder Meade and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress . ; LS , in the handwriting of H, Park Collection, Morristown National Historical Park, Morristown, New Jersey.
Springfield [ New Jersey ] June 19, 1780 . Informs Reed of arrival of Admiral Arbuthnot and British fleet. Asks for “the aid of two hundred and fifty teams.” Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Bergen County [ New Jersey ] July 4, 1780 . States that “legislature of Pennsylvania has vested you, in case of necessity with a power of declaring Martial law throughout the state, to enable you to take such measures as the exigency may demand.” Urges Reed to use this power to complete Continental battalions. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of...
After you left this yesterday Mr Tudor presented me with the Inclosed—as there may be some observations worthy of notice I forward it to you, that it may be presented to the Congress; but I would have his remarks upon the frequency of General Courts Martial consider’d with some degree of caution, for although the nature of his Office affords him the best oppertunity of discovering the...
The Ship-wreck of a Vessell, said to be from Philadelphia to Boston near Plymouth, with 120 Pipes of Wine, 118 of which are save’d—another from Boston to Hallifax near Beverly, with about 240£s worth of dry Goods—the taking of a Wood Vessel bound to Boston by Captn Adams —and the sudden departure of Mr Randolph (occassiond by the death of his Uncle) are all the occurrances, worth noticing,...
Your Letters of the 4th from New York—7th and—from Philadelphia (the last by Express) are all before me; and gave me the pleasure to hear of your happy meeting with Mrs Reed, without any other accident than that of leaving a Horse by the way. The hint contain’d in the last of your Letters respecting your continuance in my Family; in other words, your wish that I could dispense with it, gives...
Your Letter of the 16th by Post now lyes before me, & I thank you for the attention paid to my Memorandums; the arrival of Money will be an agreeable Circumstance. I recollect no occurrance of moment since my last, except the taking possession of Cobble Hill on Wednesday night[.] this to my great surprize we did, & have worked on ever since, without receiving a single Shott from Bunkers...
By Post, I wrote to you yesterday in answer to your Letter of the 16th, since which your favours of the 15th & 17th are come to hand. In one of these you justly observe, that the sudden departure of Mr Randolph must cause your absence to be the more sensibly felt; I can truely assure you that I miss you exceedingly; & if an express declaration of this be wanting, to hasten your return, I make...
Two days ago I wrote fully to you by Captn Blewer—to this Letter I refer—since which your favr of the 20th with the agreeable Post[s]cript of the 21st, is come to hand, and demands my acknowledgements for the Civility intended Mrs Washington, by you &ca. I have a very singular pleasure in informing of you, that by Express last Night from Cape Ann, I received the glad tidings of the Capture of...
Since my last, I have had the pleasure of receiving your Favours of the 28th Ulto and 2d Instt. I must again express my gratitude for the attention shewn Mrs Washington at Philadelphia—It cannot but be pleasing, altho’ it did in some measure, impede the progress of her journey on the Road. I am much obliged to you for the hints containd in both of the above Letters respecting the jealousies...
Since my last your favours of the 7th, & 11th as also the 8th are come to hand—the first last Night—the 2d by Wednesdays Post; for the several pieces of information therein contain’d I thank you. Nothing new has happened in this Quarter since my last, except the setting in of a severe spell of cold Weather & considerable fall of Snow; which, together, have interrupted our work on Litchmeres...
Since my last, I have recd your obliging favours of the 19th & 23d Ulto & thank you for the Articles of Intelligence therein containd; as I also do for the Buttons which accompanied the last Letter, althô I had got a sett, better I think, made at Concord. I am exceeding glad to find, that things wear a better face in Virginia than they did sometime ago; but I do not think that any thing less...
The bearer presents an oppertunity to me, of acknowledging the receipt of your favour of the 30th Ulto (which never came to my hands till last Night) and, if I have not done it before, of your other of the 23d preceeding. The hints you have communicated from time to time not only deserve, but do most sincerely, and cordially meet with my thanks—you cannot render a more acceptable service, nor...
Real necessity, compells me to ask you whether I may entertain any hopes of your returning to my Family? if you can make it convenient, and will hint the matter to Colo. Harrison, I dare venture to say that Congress will make it agreeable to you in every shape they can—My business Increases very fast, and my distresses for want of you, along with it—Mr Harrison is the only Gentleman of my...
In my last (date not recollected) by Mr John Adams, I communicated my distresses to you, on Acct of my want of your Assistance —since this, I have been under some concern at doing of it, least it should precipitate your return before you were ripe for it, or bring on a final resignation, which I am unwilling to think of, if your return can be made convenient and agreeable—True it is, that from...
I had wrote the Letter herewith Inclosed before your favour of the 21st came to hand —The Acct given of the behaviour of the Men under Genl Montgomerie is exactly consonant to the opinion I have form’d of these People, and such as they will exhibit abundant proofs of in similar cases whenever called upon—Place them behind a Parapet—a Breast Work—Stone Wall—or anything that will afford them...
Your obliging favours of the 28th Ulto & 1st Instt are now before me, & claim my particular thanks for the polite attention you pay to my wishes, in an early, & regular Communication of what is passing in your Quarter. If my dear Sir, you conceive that I took any thing wrong, or amiss, that was conveyed in any of your former Letters you are really mistaken—I only meant to convince you, that...
A Line or two from you by Colo. Bull, which came to hand last Evening, is the only Letter I have receivd from you since the 21st of Jany —this added to my getting none from any other Corrispondant to the Southward, leads me to apprehend some miscarriage. I am to observe thô that the Saturday’s Post is not yet arrived—by that I may, possibly, get Letters. We have, under as many difficulties...
We have, at length, got the Ministerial Troops in this Quarter on Ship board. Our possessing Dorchester Heights, as mentioned in my last, put them (after they had given over the design of attacking us) into a most violent hurry to Imbark, which was still further precipitated on Sunday Morning by our breaking Ground on Nukes hill (the point nearest the Town) the night before. The whole Fleet is...
Since my last, things remain nearly in Statu-quo—the Enemy have the best nack at puzling People I ever met with in my life. They have blown up—burst—and demolished the Castle, totally; and are now all in Nantasket Road—have been there ever since Wednesday; what doing the Lord knows—various are the conjectures; the Bostonians think there stay there absolutely necessary to fit them for Sea, as...