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Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 7, 1777. Orders release of “Mr. Smith” who had been acting as a spy for the Americans and was mistakenly arrested by Major General Benjamin Lincoln. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Joseph Reed had resigned as adjutant general and was residing in Philadelphia as a private citizen.
I am informed, there is a certain Mr Smith, who has been lately taken up by General Lincoln as a spy & sent to Philadelphia under that character. I believe for several reasons that he is the man who was imployed by you to act for Us, in that capacity, and that the apprehending him is a mistake, which may be attended with ill-consequences. Lest he should be precipitately tried and punished, I...
To prevent as far as possible the intercourse between the inhabitants of these States and the enemy in New York, I have given positive orders to Genl Maxwell, who commands at Elizabeth Town, to permit no persons being inhabitants of or coming from any of the States to pass to Staten Island or New York without permission has been first obtained from their respective Governors or legislative...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] April 26, 1779 . Announces postponement of Major General Benedict Arnold’s trial. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Reed was president of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania.
Smiths Clove [ New York ] June 14, 1779 . Encloses return of Pennsylvania battalions. States that Major General Benedict Arnold’s trial has been postponed. Sends news of enemy movements. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
New Windsor [ New York ] July 5, 1779 . Asks for reinforcements for Major General John Sullivan. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 20, 1779 . States that if expected number of men are raised in Pennsylvania, it will not be necessary to call out militia. Is pleased that the date has finally been set for Major General Benedict Arnold’s trial. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I returned yesterday to this Place from Rhode Island, and now take the earliest opportunity to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 19th Ulto which was put into my hands on my arrival. I am extremely obliged to you, Gentlemen, for this communication of the Proceedings with respect to the late unhappy affair, which has taken place in the Pennsylvania Line—Sensible that the circumstances...
I have the honor of transmitting the Committee of arrangement the inclosed from Colonel Cadwallader. It is in answer to my letter at the white-plains, which accompanied one of the committee’s on the same subject. I could wish the committee to consider, if there is any method, yet remaining, by which his scruples might be removed, and the affair settled in a conclusive and satisfactory manner....
Your obliging favours of the 28th Ulto & 1st Instt are now before me, & claim my particular thanks for the polite attention you pay to my wishes, in an early, & regular Communication of what is passing in your Quarter. If my dear Sir, you conceive that I took any thing wrong, or amiss, that was conveyed in any of your former Letters you are really mistaken—I only meant to convince you, that...
I have the honor of your Excellency’s favr of the 5th instant inclosing sundry Resolves of the Executive Council respecting the Conduct of Major General Arnold during his command in the City of Philada: previous to the Rect of your letter, General Arnold, who had arrived at Head Quarters the day before, had shewn me a letter from the Council to him accompanied by a Copy of the same Resolves,...
Your favour of the 13th was this Instt put into my hands—scarce time enough to acknowledge, the receipt of it (by this Post) and to thank you for your great care and attention in providing my Camp Equipage—whatever the list you sent, may fall short of your Intention of Providing, can be got here; and may be delayed; as the want, or not of them, will depend upon Circumstances. I am exceedingly...
I had last night the honor to receive Your Excellency’s letter of the 16th with the papers you have been pleased to refer to me. There is certainly a good deal of weight in the observations and objections which Colo. Hazen has made, and it were very much to be wished, that the supplies of Cloathing and necessaries in every instance were perfectly equal to the officers & men respectively,...
I have been honored with your Excellencys Letter of the 18th inst. and observed with much Pleasure the Train into which the recruitg the proposed Rifle Corps is thrown—& hope they will soon be obtained. As this Body of men will be exceedingly essential to our Designs, & may be very usefully employed in Detatchments, I have to beg of your Excellency that you will be pleaced to give Orders, that...
The appeal contained in your letter of the 11th instant, is equally unexpected & surprising. Not knowing the particular changes which are alledged against you, it is impossible for me to make a specific reply. I can therefore only say in general terms, that the Employments you sustained in the year 1776—and in that period of the year, when we experienced our greater distress, are a proof that...
I was this morning favoured with yours & thank you much for your kind congratulations & wishes. I regret much the Accident that prevented the passage of our Troops. had it not been for that cause and the Several attacks intended, had been made, I am persuaded our Plans would have succeedd to our warmest wishes. I have several Letters to write & therefore must refer you to Colo. Cadwalader who...
After you left this yesterday Mr Tudor presented me with the Inclosed—as there may be some observations worthy of notice I forward it to you, that it may be presented to the Congress; but I would have his remarks upon the frequency of General Courts Martial consider’d with some degree of caution, for although the nature of his Office affords him the best oppertunity of discovering the...
I have the honor to thank you most sincerely for your Congratulations conveyed in your Favor of the 27th ulto. That our Success against the Enemy in the State of Virginia, has been so happily effected, & with so little Loss— and that it promises such favorable consequences (if properly improved) to the Welfare & Independence of the United States— is Matter of very pleasing Reflections. I beg...
Since my last, things remain nearly in Statu-quo—the Enemy have the best nack at puzling People I ever met with in my life. They have blown up—burst—and demolished the Castle, totally; and are now all in Nantasket Road—have been there ever since Wednesday; what doing the Lord knows—various are the conjectures; the Bostonians think there stay there absolutely necessary to fit them for Sea, as...
Yours of the eleventh is Come to hand if the account the prisoners give be true it is a very agreeable & important one. the order you Sent to Colonel Winds has interferd with a plan, Concerted by Generals Sullivan & Maxwell, whenever you have occasion to order a Movement of any part of the Army, it will be best to apply to the Commanding Officer, Lest it may, [(]as it has in the present...
I am much indebted to your Excellency for announcing my election as a member of the Philosophical Society. I feel myself particularly honored by this relation to a society whose successful efforts for promoting useful knowledge have already justly acquired them the highest reputation in the literary world. I entreat you to pres[en]t my warmest acknowledgments, and to assure them that I shall...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favour of the 20th and 22d instants. I am exceedingly sorry to find you express a doubt of being able immediately to procure the number of 250 Waggons in the State of Pennsylvania—if we should be disappointed in that quarter, I know not where we are to apply. The Quarter Master General has, as you observe, a considerable number of Waggons laying idle...
(I am much obliged to you for your favor of the 23d. Nothing could be more necessary than the aid given by your State towards supplying us with provision. I assure you, every idea you can form of our distresses will fall short of the reality. There is such a combination of circumstances to exhaust the patience of the soldiery that it begins at length to be worn out—and we see in every line of...
We have, at length, got the Ministerial Troops in this Quarter on Ship board. Our possessing Dorchester Heights, as mentioned in my last, put them (after they had given over the design of attacking us) into a most violent hurry to Imbark, which was still further precipitated on Sunday Morning by our breaking Ground on Nukes hill (the point nearest the Town) the night before. The whole Fleet is...
By your favor of the third from Bethlehem, I perceive my letter of the first had not got to your hands; but I have the pleasure to find that the business you were upon anticipated the purpose of it, and was in a fair way to answer the end. Arnold’s conduct is so villainously perfidious, that there are no terms that can describe the baseness of his heart—That over-ruling Providence which has so...
Your favr of the 29th March reached me a day or two ago—I cannot conceive from whence can arise the antipathy of Colo. Proctor and His Officers to the Uniform adopted by all the other Regiments of Artillery. In every service, it is customary to distinguish Corps by particular Uniforms, and as Black and Red has been pitched upon for that of the American Continental Artille[r]y, it is...
Doctor Hodges will have the Honor of presenting this to Your Excellency. The Inclosed, a Copy of a Letter from Governor Trumbull, will inform you of the business he is upon. It is important & interesting and I am persuaded the Doctor will meet with every assistence that you can give him in the prosecution of it. I have the Honor &c. Df , in Robert Hanson Harrison’s writing, DLC:GW ; Varick...
I am honored with your Excellency’s Favor of the 7th. I am exceedingly happy to find that the mode of procuring the specific Supplies demanded of the state is now upon such a footing that we may hope for a full & regular Compliance in future: and I doubt not but if the other States will follow the Example, and appropriate a proportion of their Revenue to the Disposal of the Superintendant of...
Two days ago I wrote fully to you by Captn Blewer—to this Letter I refer—since which your favr of the 20th with the agreeable Post[s]cript of the 21st, is come to hand, and demands my acknowledgements for the Civility intended Mrs Washington, by you &ca. I have a very singular pleasure in informing of you, that by Express last Night from Cape Ann, I received the glad tidings of the Capture of...
I have been favourd with several of your Letters since I came to this place, some of them indeed after getting pretty well advanced on the Road towards Boston—My extreame hurry, with one kind of business and engagement or another, leaves me little more than time to express my concern for your Indisposition, and the interposition of other obstacles to prevent me from receiving that aid from you...