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Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 26 Jan. 1794. In his second letter to GW of this date , Randolph wrote that he “has just had the honor of receiving the President’s letter.”
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 20 April 1795. On 24 April, Randolph wrote GW: “I had the honor of receiving yesterday your favor of the 20th instant from Mount Vernon.”
It is my wish to set off for Mount Vernon on Monday next. With some inconvenience to myself, it might be delayed until Wednesday; beyond which the purposes of my journey would, in a great measure, be defeated by further delay. I therefore desire that everything which requires my attention in your Department previous to my absence, may be laid before me with as much promptitude as the case will...
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 21 April 1795. On 26 April, Randolph wrote GW: “I have the honor to acknowledge your favor of the 21st instant.”
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 28 Feb. 1793. In his letter to GW of 28 Feb. , Randolph wrote that he “did not receive the letter, with which you honored me this morning, until my return from the Statehouse at 4 O’clock this afternoon.”
You will add to the obligations under which you have already laid me, by taking the trouble to transmit the inclosed to the speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates. I am happy in having so good an opportunity, as that which now offers by Capt. la Touche, of forwarding the letter to the Marquis de la Fayette. I am not a judge of the Etiquette upon these occasions, but it really does seem odd...
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 17 April 1795. On 20 April, Randolph wrote GW: “On saturday I was honored by your letter from Baltimore of the 17th instant.”
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, c.18 May 1793. Randolph wrote GW on 18 May , “I was from home, sir, on the business of your letter, when you did me the honor of stopping at our house.”
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 23 July. On 29 July Randolph wrote GW : “Your favor of the 23d instant came duly to hand.”
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 24 April 1795. A letter from Randolph to GW dated 29 April refers to “your favor of the 24th instant.”
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 10 Sept. 1791. Randolph wrote to GW on Monday, 12 Sept. , of “your communication to me on Saturday last.”
Letter not found : to Edmund Randolph, 21 June 1794. Randolph wrote GW on 27 June : "The appointment of Mr Pickering, which is mentioned in your favor of the 21st instant from George Town, was noted in my report on the laws."
The Commission for the Postmaster General, is signed and returned. The other for the Marshall of the District of North Carolina is also signed & forwarded by Post. Tomorrow I commence my journey for the Seat of the Governmt. ADfS , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. Randolph had sent these commissions for GW’s signature in...
The Letters to the Minister of the French republic, appears proper. The propriety of laying those from him, before Congress, I will converse with you upon tomorrow morning at Eight o clock. By whom is the request made for a Passport for a Vessel belonging to Mr Jno. Brown to go to St Domingo? I have no objection to the measure if such cases are within the contemplation of the Resolution laying...
For the reasons mentioned to you the other day—viz.—the Virginia Assembly being in Session—and a plan being on foot for establishing a Seminary of learning upon an extensive scale in the Federal city —it would oblige me if you and Mr Madison would endeavor to mature the measures which will be proper for me to pursue in order to bring my designs into view, as soon as you can make it convenient...
The posture of affairs in Europe, particularly between France and Great Britain, places the United States in a delicate situation; and requires much consideration of the measures which will be proper for them to observe in the War betwn. those Powers. With a view to forming a general plan of conduct for the Executive, I have stated and enclosed sundry questions to be considered preparatory to...
I am exceedingly sorry for the cause of your detention in Philadelphia, of which your letter of the 24 inst. informed me. But as I expect to leave this place on monday next for Virginia, it would not be in your power to arrive here, by that time, after the rect of this. There will therefore be no necessity for your leaving Mrs Randolph in her present situation to meet me in New York. I am Sir...
I have received your letter of this date and Shall give it that attention which the importance of the subject, to which it relates, demands. When I have made up my opinion on the matter you shall be informed thereof—with very gret esteem I am Sir, Yr most Obedt Sert Df , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DLC:GW . Letter not found, but see GW to Randolph, 11 Feb. 1790 .
Your private letter of the 3d instt; accompanying the public dispatches, was received yesterday; & I rejoice exceedingly that the apprehensions on acct of the yellow fever have vanished. It would have given great alarm to all those in this Camp who left families in the City, if Mrs Washington had retired from it; & on the other hand it would have been a source of continual uneasiness to me in...
I have weighed with deliberate attention the contents of your letter of yesterday; and altho’ that consideration may result in an approbation of the ideas the[re]in suggested; yet I do not, at present, feel myself authorized to give a sanction to the measures which you propose. For, as the Constitution of the United States, & the Laws made under it, must mark the line of my official conduct, I...
In reply to your favor of the 2d I have to request that you will not be at the trouble of forwarding any money to me from the treasury. If I should attend the Service, it will suit me as well to receive it from you in Philadelphia as at this place. If I should not, I have no business with it at all. It gives me pleasure to find by your letter that there will be so full a representation from...
(Private) My dear Sir, Mount Vernon Augt 26th 1792 The purpose of this letter is merely to acknowledge the receipt of your favors of the 5th & 13th instt, and to thank you for the information contained in both without entering into the details of either. With respect, however, to the interesting subject treated on in that of the 5th, I can express but one sentiment at this time, and that is a...
Your letter of the 7th is this instant come to hand. Elizabeth & Sarah, daughters of Michl Cresap, live I presume in Hampshire, to the Sheriff of which I will direct the summons; tho’ it is at a hazard—having no other knowledge of the matter, than that their mother married one Jacobs of that county. Luther Martin lives in Maryland, and is I believe Attorney General of that State—What is to be...
At my return from Philada I met your favor of the 15th ulto—& since, have received that of the 28th. The rough draft of the conveyance from Colo. Bassett to me, appearing to be just in recital, &, I presume, legal in form; I return it with a wish that the business may be finally accomplished as soon as circumstances will permit. With respect to the Suit of Doctr Savage, you will be so good as...
(Private) Dear Sir Mount Vernon June 25th 1794. Monday’s Post brought me your letter of the 18th instant, with its enclosures. The Minister of his Britanic Majesty seems more disposed to be captious than conciliatory. Whether it proceeds from his ideas of policy—the advice of his councellers—or a natural petulance of temper, remains to be developed. The enclosed letter from a Mr Reuben Harvey,...
(Private) Dear Sir, Tuesday Morning 19th Augt—94. I sincerely condole with you & Mrs Randolph on your late loss; but as it was an event which had been long expected, I hope she will meet the stroke with fortitude. Under the circumstances wch exist it is by no means my desire that you should attend to the duties of yr Departmt in the City to day—unless it accords perfectly with your convenience...
I have received your letter of this morning, and in consideration of the reasons urged in that, & a former letter I consent to your returning to Virginia; but hope that your absence from the Seat of Government will not exceed the time mentioned in your letter to me of the 5th inst. With very great esteem, I am Sir, Your most Obedt Servt. Df , in Tobias Lear’s writing, DNA : RG 59,...
I send you a letter of the 26 Ulto from William Bingham Esquire to the Secretary of the Treasury together with the documents accompanying it. I desire your opinion on the following points arising upon these papers. I   Whether the proceedings heretofore by the UStates in Congress assembled have transferred from Mr. Bingham to the public the consequences of the transaction in question so as to...
It is my desire that you would, with as little delay as can be avoided, examine all the acts of the last session of Congress; and report such parts as call for the particular attention of the Executive; that they may be put into a proper course of execution. L (letterpress copy), DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. The date,...
Philadelphia, May 14, 1794. “Consider, attentively, the Memorial of Walter Stewart, David H. Conyngham, Joseph Gilpin and J Grubb (with the papers accompanying it, in behalf of themselves & others) and report to me your opinions thereupon.” ALS , RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters, 1790–1799, National Archives; LC , RG 59, State Department Correspondence, 1791–1796, National Archives. On April 24,...
The letter which you did me the honor of writing to me on the 27th Ulto, with the enclosure, came duly to hand. I receive them as a fresh instance of your friendship and attention. For both I thank you. The diversity of Sentiments upon the important matter which has been submitted to the People, was as much expected as it is regretted, by me. The various passions and medium by which men are...
I think the United States will be benifited by granting the request of Louis Osmont —but, as applications have been, and probably will be frequent—I conceive it will be advisable to ascertain as nearly as may be the precise objects of the Embargo —and havg so done to establish rules or principles that will meet cases as they shall occur which will save trouble at the same time that it will be...
I have duly recd your several Letters of the 20th 21st & 22d instt, with their enclosures. The only matter which seems to require my immediate attention is contained in the last of them. I am not disposed under my present view of the case, to inform Mr Hammond that Our Envoy at the Court of London shall be specially instructed on the point of compensation, for British vessels captured by...
Your letter of the 14th only came by the Post of last night, to Alexandria, & this is sent thither to day, that it may go by tomorrow’s Mail, & thereby reach you as soon as the nature of the case will admit. As you have given no positive opinion respecting the Power of the Executive to change the place for Congress to meet at, & as it is uncertain what will be the result of this business; I am...
By Doctr Stuart I return the books you were so obliging as to allow me the reading of: by him also I send you the Travels of the Marqs de Chastellux, for your perusal. I felt for your disappointment the day you left this, & hope no accidents intervened afterwards to give further interruption to your journey. Unknowing of the quantity of rain which had fallen in the course of the night, I was...
Your resignation of the Office of State, is received. Candour induces me to give you, in a few words, the following narrative of facts. The letter from Mr Fauchet, with the contents of which you were made acquainted yesterday, was as you supposed, an interscepted one. It was sent by Lord Grenville to Mr Hammond; by him put into the hands of the Secretary of the Treasury; by him shewn to the...
My letters for the Post office in Alexandria, had been sent off some hours before the enclosed dispatches were put into my hands, by the young Gentleman whose name is mentioned in Govr Clintons letter to me, also forwarded. Not willing to lose a Post day, I hasten to send the resolutions above alluded to, late as it is, to Alexandria; to go on tomorrow— with a request similar to the one made...
It appears to me necessary, that processes should issue without further delay upon the Indictments found at the last Circuit Court held at York Town in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, in reference to the laws laying a duty on Spirits distilled within the United States —and proper, that they should be served by the Marshal of the District of Pennsylvania, in person. I am to desire, that the...
Yesterday at 11 Oclock your dispatches of the 7th were delivered to me in less than 23 hours from the rect of them by the Express in Philadelphia. Little, of moment, has occurred since mine of the 6th. A meeting of the Committee of 60, at Parkinson’s ferry the 2d instt have resolved that if the signature of the submission, be not universal, it is not so much owing to any existing disposition...
When I wrote to you yesterday, I did not expect to be in this village at this hour. But finding it difficult to get even part of the Troops off, that were ordered to March yesterday, I resolved to see the residue in motion to day before I left this place, myself. This dilatoriness does not proceed from any disinclination in the Troops themselves, to proceed; but for want of arrangement, and...
The Inclosed will make the third letter I have written to Mr Nicholas within twelve months upon an interesting matter to Colo. Fairfax, without receiving an answer. As I am convinced a miscarriage of my letters, and not inattention in him is the cause of it, I take the liberty of addressing the inclosed to your care & shall thank you for the bare acknowledgment of it. At this moment, we are in...
I have lately received three letters from you: two bearing date the 15th instant; the other the 21st. One of the former came to hand the 19th, the other the 21st —and the latter yesterday. Your signature as Secretary of State to the ratification of the Treaty having been given on the 14th of August —and your resignation not taking place until the 19th it became necessary, in order to be...
Some considerable time ago I wrote a letter to my Nephew, Bushrod Washington, and used the freedom of addressing it to your care—At that time I conceived he was living at richmond, but the establishment of circuit Courts it seems has changed his plan: he now intends to fix at Fredericksburg. Will you allow me the liberty my dear sir, to request the favor of you to open my letter to him, if it...
It gave me great pleasure to hear that the voice of the Country had been directed to you as chief magistrate of this Commonwealth, & that you had accepted the appointment. Our affairs seem to be drawing to an awful crisis: it is necessary therefore that the abilities of every man should be drawn into action in a public line, to rescue them if possible from impending ruin. As no one seems more...
It is to be regretted that the Snow Camilla had not got off before she was arrested by the Revenue Officer. To permit it now as she is a loaded Vessel might be a delicate, if not an unjustifiable measure, under the Act of Congress laying an Embargo. Whether the representation of the French Minister in his second application is of weight sufficient to induce a departure from the obvious meaning...
In consequence of your letter to me of the 25t[h] inst. stating the opinion of the Secretarry of State, the Secretary of the Treasury and yourself, on the subject of a suit instituted against Mr Bingham —and suggesting the propriety of giving instructions to the Attorney for the United S. in the Massachusetts Dist. to appear in behalf of Mr Bingham —provided that Mr Bingham will execute...
The President of the United States requests the attendance of the at Nine o’Clock tomorrow morning ; at the President’s house, on the subject of the note sent to the on the 17~. inst: and that the will bring with him such remarks as he may have committed to writing in pursuance of said note. At the same time the President will lay before the Heads of the Departments & the Attorney General some...
Your letter of the 25th instt enclosing one from Mr G. Morris of the 7th of March, came duly to hand. The measures you have taken in consequence thereof, appear to be expedient & proper. I am sorry to find by his private letters (two of which I send for your perusal, & to be returned) that he & our other Ministers abroad, are continually repeating (& complaining of) their want of information...
Agreeably to your request & my promise, and as soon as it has been in my power, I send you a copy of Mr Fauchet’s letter No. 10 to the “commissaire du départment des relations extêrieures.” LB , DLC:GW . For Randolph’s request and GW’s promise, see Randolph to GW, 19 Aug. (first letter), and GW to Randolph, 20 August. For discussion of then-French minister Jean-Antoine-Joseph Fauchet’s letter,...
Let me know whether the message (which in the evening of yesterday) I requested you to draw, will be ready by 11 o’clock this forenoon? If you answer in the affirmative, I shall require the Gentlemen with whom I usually advise on these occasions, to attend me at that hour; for I consider that message (both as to matter & form) of such importance as to make it necessary that every word of it...