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    • Washington, George
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    • Randolph, Edmund

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Randolph, Edmund"
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Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 26 Jan. 1794. In his second letter to GW of this date , Randolph wrote that he “has just had the honor of receiving the President’s letter.”
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 20 April 1795. On 24 April, Randolph wrote GW: “I had the honor of receiving yesterday your favor of the 20th instant from Mount Vernon.”
It is my wish to set off for Mount Vernon on Monday next. With some inconvenience to myself, it might be delayed until Wednesday; beyond which the purposes of my journey would, in a great measure, be defeated by further delay. I therefore desire that everything which requires my attention in your Department previous to my absence, may be laid before me with as much promptitude as the case will...
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 21 April 1795. On 26 April, Randolph wrote GW: “I have the honor to acknowledge your favor of the 21st instant.”
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 28 Feb. 1793. In his letter to GW of 28 Feb. , Randolph wrote that he “did not receive the letter, with which you honored me this morning, until my return from the Statehouse at 4 O’clock this afternoon.”
You will add to the obligations under which you have already laid me, by taking the trouble to transmit the inclosed to the speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates. I am happy in having so good an opportunity, as that which now offers by Capt. la Touche, of forwarding the letter to the Marquis de la Fayette. I am not a judge of the Etiquette upon these occasions, but it really does seem odd...
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 17 April 1795. On 20 April, Randolph wrote GW: “On saturday I was honored by your letter from Baltimore of the 17th instant.”
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, c.18 May 1793. Randolph wrote GW on 18 May , “I was from home, sir, on the business of your letter, when you did me the honor of stopping at our house.”
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 23 July. On 29 July Randolph wrote GW : “Your favor of the 23d instant came duly to hand.”
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 24 April 1795. A letter from Randolph to GW dated 29 April refers to “your favor of the 24th instant.”
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 10 Sept. 1791. Randolph wrote to GW on Monday, 12 Sept. , of “your communication to me on Saturday last.”
Letter not found : to Edmund Randolph, 21 June 1794. Randolph wrote GW on 27 June : "The appointment of Mr Pickering, which is mentioned in your favor of the 21st instant from George Town, was noted in my report on the laws."
The Commission for the Postmaster General, is signed and returned. The other for the Marshall of the District of North Carolina is also signed & forwarded by Post. Tomorrow I commence my journey for the Seat of the Governmt. ADfS , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. Randolph had sent these commissions for GW’s signature in...
The Letters to the Minister of the French republic, appears proper. The propriety of laying those from him, before Congress, I will converse with you upon tomorrow morning at Eight o clock. By whom is the request made for a Passport for a Vessel belonging to Mr Jno. Brown to go to St Domingo? I have no objection to the measure if such cases are within the contemplation of the Resolution laying...
For the reasons mentioned to you the other day—viz.—the Virginia Assembly being in Session—and a plan being on foot for establishing a Seminary of learning upon an extensive scale in the Federal city —it would oblige me if you and Mr Madison would endeavor to mature the measures which will be proper for me to pursue in order to bring my designs into view, as soon as you can make it convenient...
The posture of affairs in Europe, particularly between France and Great Britain, places the United States in a delicate situation; and requires much consideration of the measures which will be proper for them to observe in the War betwn. those Powers. With a view to forming a general plan of conduct for the Executive, I have stated and enclosed sundry questions to be considered preparatory to...
I am exceedingly sorry for the cause of your detention in Philadelphia, of which your letter of the 24 inst. informed me. But as I expect to leave this place on monday next for Virginia, it would not be in your power to arrive here, by that time, after the rect of this. There will therefore be no necessity for your leaving Mrs Randolph in her present situation to meet me in New York. I am Sir...
I have received your letter of this date and Shall give it that attention which the importance of the subject, to which it relates, demands. When I have made up my opinion on the matter you shall be informed thereof—with very gret esteem I am Sir, Yr most Obedt Sert Df , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DLC:GW . Letter not found, but see GW to Randolph, 11 Feb. 1790 .
Your private letter of the 3d instt; accompanying the public dispatches, was received yesterday; & I rejoice exceedingly that the apprehensions on acct of the yellow fever have vanished. It would have given great alarm to all those in this Camp who left families in the City, if Mrs Washington had retired from it; & on the other hand it would have been a source of continual uneasiness to me in...
I have weighed with deliberate attention the contents of your letter of yesterday; and altho’ that consideration may result in an approbation of the ideas the[re]in suggested; yet I do not, at present, feel myself authorized to give a sanction to the measures which you propose. For, as the Constitution of the United States, & the Laws made under it, must mark the line of my official conduct, I...
In reply to your favor of the 2d I have to request that you will not be at the trouble of forwarding any money to me from the treasury. If I should attend the Service, it will suit me as well to receive it from you in Philadelphia as at this place. If I should not, I have no business with it at all. It gives me pleasure to find by your letter that there will be so full a representation from...
(Private) My dear Sir, Mount Vernon Augt 26th 1792 The purpose of this letter is merely to acknowledge the receipt of your favors of the 5th & 13th instt, and to thank you for the information contained in both without entering into the details of either. With respect, however, to the interesting subject treated on in that of the 5th, I can express but one sentiment at this time, and that is a...
Your letter of the 7th is this instant come to hand. Elizabeth & Sarah, daughters of Michl Cresap, live I presume in Hampshire, to the Sheriff of which I will direct the summons; tho’ it is at a hazard—having no other knowledge of the matter, than that their mother married one Jacobs of that county. Luther Martin lives in Maryland, and is I believe Attorney General of that State—What is to be...
At my return from Philada I met your favor of the 15th ulto—& since, have received that of the 28th. The rough draft of the conveyance from Colo. Bassett to me, appearing to be just in recital, &, I presume, legal in form; I return it with a wish that the business may be finally accomplished as soon as circumstances will permit. With respect to the Suit of Doctr Savage, you will be so good as...
(Private) Dear Sir Mount Vernon June 25th 1794. Monday’s Post brought me your letter of the 18th instant, with its enclosures. The Minister of his Britanic Majesty seems more disposed to be captious than conciliatory. Whether it proceeds from his ideas of policy—the advice of his councellers—or a natural petulance of temper, remains to be developed. The enclosed letter from a Mr Reuben Harvey,...
(Private) Dear Sir, Tuesday Morning 19th Augt—94. I sincerely condole with you & Mrs Randolph on your late loss; but as it was an event which had been long expected, I hope she will meet the stroke with fortitude. Under the circumstances wch exist it is by no means my desire that you should attend to the duties of yr Departmt in the City to day—unless it accords perfectly with your convenience...
I have received your letter of this morning, and in consideration of the reasons urged in that, & a former letter I consent to your returning to Virginia; but hope that your absence from the Seat of Government will not exceed the time mentioned in your letter to me of the 5th inst. With very great esteem, I am Sir, Your most Obedt Servt. Df , in Tobias Lear’s writing, DNA : RG 59,...
I send you a letter of the 26 Ulto from William Bingham Esquire to the Secretary of the Treasury together with the documents accompanying it. I desire your opinion on the following points arising upon these papers. I   Whether the proceedings heretofore by the UStates in Congress assembled have transferred from Mr. Bingham to the public the consequences of the transaction in question so as to...
It is my desire that you would, with as little delay as can be avoided, examine all the acts of the last session of Congress; and report such parts as call for the particular attention of the Executive; that they may be put into a proper course of execution. L (letterpress copy), DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. The date,...
Philadelphia, May 14, 1794. “Consider, attentively, the Memorial of Walter Stewart, David H. Conyngham, Joseph Gilpin and J Grubb (with the papers accompanying it, in behalf of themselves & others) and report to me your opinions thereupon.” ALS , RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters, 1790–1799, National Archives; LC , RG 59, State Department Correspondence, 1791–1796, National Archives. On April 24,...