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    • Washington, George
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    • Randolph, Edmund

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Randolph, Edmund"
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I have received your letter of this morning, and in consideration of the reasons urged in that, & a former letter I consent to your returning to Virginia; but hope that your absence from the Seat of Government will not exceed the time mentioned in your letter to me of the 5th inst. With very great esteem, I am Sir, Your most Obedt Servt. Df , in Tobias Lear’s writing, DNA : RG 59,...
I send you a letter of the 26 Ulto from William Bingham Esquire to the Secretary of the Treasury together with the documents accompanying it. I desire your opinion on the following points arising upon these papers. I   Whether the proceedings heretofore by the UStates in Congress assembled have transferred from Mr. Bingham to the public the consequences of the transaction in question so as to...
It is my desire that you would, with as little delay as can be avoided, examine all the acts of the last session of Congress; and report such parts as call for the particular attention of the Executive; that they may be put into a proper course of execution. L (letterpress copy), DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His Secretaries of State. The date,...
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 26 Jan. 1794. In his second letter to GW of this date , Randolph wrote that he “has just had the honor of receiving the President’s letter.”
Philadelphia, May 14, 1794. “Consider, attentively, the Memorial of Walter Stewart, David H. Conyngham, Joseph Gilpin and J Grubb (with the papers accompanying it, in behalf of themselves & others) and report to me your opinions thereupon.” ALS , RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters, 1790–1799, National Archives; LC , RG 59, State Department Correspondence, 1791–1796, National Archives. On April 24,...
The letter which you did me the honor of writing to me on the 27th Ulto, with the enclosure, came duly to hand. I receive them as a fresh instance of your friendship and attention. For both I thank you. The diversity of Sentiments upon the important matter which has been submitted to the People, was as much expected as it is regretted, by me. The various passions and medium by which men are...
Letter not found: to Edmund Randolph, 20 April 1795. On 24 April, Randolph wrote GW: “I had the honor of receiving yesterday your favor of the 20th instant from Mount Vernon.”
It is my wish to set off for Mount Vernon on Monday next. With some inconvenience to myself, it might be delayed until Wednesday; beyond which the purposes of my journey would, in a great measure, be defeated by further delay. I therefore desire that everything which requires my attention in your Department previous to my absence, may be laid before me with as much promptitude as the case will...
I think the United States will be benifited by granting the request of Louis Osmont —but, as applications have been, and probably will be frequent—I conceive it will be advisable to ascertain as nearly as may be the precise objects of the Embargo —and havg so done to establish rules or principles that will meet cases as they shall occur which will save trouble at the same time that it will be...
I have duly recd your several Letters of the 20th 21st & 22d instt, with their enclosures. The only matter which seems to require my immediate attention is contained in the last of them. I am not disposed under my present view of the case, to inform Mr Hammond that Our Envoy at the Court of London shall be specially instructed on the point of compensation, for British vessels captured by...