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    • Washington, George
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    • Pickering, Timothy

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Pickering, Timothy"
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My letters to the Secretary of the Treasury of the 4th & 6th Instant, with the present enclosure, conveys fully the sentiments of the Attorney General with respect to the best mode of executing the Act "For the relief and Protection of American Seamen". He has, since his opinion was transmitted in the above letter of the 6th, consulted two of our most eminent Lawyers, in these parts, and finds...
I had no time yesterday morning to look into the gazettes; nor did I know until the evening, that the French frigate Medusa had slipped her Cables & put to Sea on the 31st ulto; and was followed in a few hours by the Africa. This circumstance, be the result what it may, I regret exceedingly; & because the effect of the order as it relates to the British will be the same as if the Africa had...
I was honored yesterday with the Boards Letter of the 19th Instant. From the apprehensions of the public of an Indian war in the western department, and the earnest applications of General McIntosh for Troops, I was induced the 15 of the month to detach Durkee’s & Ransom’s companies for that command. I am told by Lt Buck that they are halted at Lancaster. As they are detached from this Army,...
Confidential Dear Sir, Mount Vernon 3d March 1799 The unexpectedness of the event, communicated in your letter of the 21st Ulto, did, as you may suppose, surprise me not a little. But far, very far indeed was this surprise short of what I experienced the next day, when by a very intelligent Gentmn (immediately from Philadelphia) I was informed that there had been no direct overture from the...
When I last wrote you on the subject of providing for the Garrison of West Point I mentioned 500 Men as the number which Congress would probably think proper to keep in that Garrison during the Winter—I have been long waiting their determination on this subject but so far from coming to any such decision, the Members with whom I have conversed seem unwilling to lessen the force now existing...
Your letter of the 1st instant was brought to me by the last Post. The Journals of the 1st 2d & 3d Sessions of the first Congress, I have, & no later. These are in folio—one volume of the Senate, and another of the House of Representatives. If no complete set can be had, either in folio or octavo, it would be useless to obtain a copy of what I now possess: but if they are to be continued in...
I have to acquaint you that I propose leaving town on Wednesday or Thursday next, & as I would wish to have you at the Army as soon as you have made the necessary arrangements for your department, I must desire you to acquaint me when you think you will be able to follow me. I am Sir, &c. MHi : Papers of George Washington.
The tranquility of winter quarters and the important change about to take place in our military establishment offer a favourable opportunity to introduce system and order into the Army: and to effect a reformation of the abuses, which may have imperceptably crept into the several departments—That our circumstances require parsimony in the distribution of public stores, and the strictest...
A nNumber of Batteaux will be wanting to transport the necessary provisions and Stores to the Garrisons which may be kept on the Western Waters . I must therefore desire that you will retain all such as are suitable for that purpose and have them put into repair. I am Sir Your very Obedient humble Servant P.S. They need be put in no other repair than what is necessary to transport them to...
The information contained in a letter of which the enclosed is a correct copy, (with the reservation only of names, agreeably to the request of the writer) may serve as a comment upon the conduct of the Owner of the Privateer Flying Fish; and as a developement also of the intentions of the French government so far as it relates to the Commerce of the United States with Great Britain. The...
The numerous & various reports which I have received from people who were not possessed of any accurate information with respect to the state of the malignant fever with which Philadelphia is so unfortunately afflicted, and my intention being to return thither, or to it’s neighbourhood about the first of next month, have induced me to ask this information from you—and I beg you will advise me...
In answer to your Letter of the 10th I can only observe: that it is not in my power to give any particular explanation to the views of Congress in the establishment of the Regiment of Artificers, beyond what is expressed in their Act. Nor do I know, with precision, what proportion of Artillery or Quarter Master Artificers may be necessary with the Army. I would therefore wish you to have a...
Your communications of the 2d Inst. have been duly received. General Wayne will, I hope & expect, leave the Garrisons in his advanced Posts sufficiently respectable. In the present uncertainty of what may be the final result of the treaty with Great Britain, and from the intimations of Captn Brant, we ought not in my opinion to œconomise at too Great a hazard; nor build too much in the present...
A Detachment of about 500 Men is to be sent to garrison the western Posts—A supply of Camp Equipage, also a considerable number of good Axes & Hatchets, with a few setts of Blacksmith’s, Armourer’s & Carpenter’s Tools will be wanted for the Troops, which may be employed on this Service—I must request you will immediately have these things provided, or repaired in the best manner, together with...
Your favor of the 25th was received by the last Post. Mr Monroe’s application is nothing more than a continuation of the old game, in a new form; and as I presume he means to play it with all the advantages that are to be derived from his auxiliaries here I will thank you for the whole of what will come before the public—now, or then, according to circumstances. I would thank you also for...
Two letters from you, dated the 18th instant, were received yesterday. For the reasons you have assigned, I think it best that Mr Boudinot should fill the Directorship of the Mint; and request he may be informed so. At the same time, urge him to come forward, if for no other purpose than to arrange matters with the present occupant—and derive from him all the insight into the business his...
I have just received advice from Otis and Henley of Boston that they had, thro’ the interest of the State, procured upwards of forty Teams which they had loaded and sent forward with Cloathing. They do not say how far the teams are to proceed, but in all probability no farther than Springfield, at which place there is also a considerable quantity of Cloathing much wanted by the Army. The...
The necessity of getting forward what Flour is upon the communication urges me to a measure which I would not wish to adopt could it be avoided. It is, to make use of a part of a sum of Money sent to the pay master General by the State of Massachusetts purposely for the payment of the troops of that line. You will in consequence of this receive a Warrant for 9000 Dollars of the new emission,...
The Jersey Brigade will be ordered to Kings-ferry to receive the Waggons of the Mas sachuset ts Troops, without any detention of the latter. No Troops about Hd Qr except the Guard & the Artillery Regiments in the vicinity of New Windsor. The light Infantry of the Jersey line will take charge of the Boats. The Massachusetts Brigades will be a t the Posts in the Highlands—West side. The...
Upon a view of the difference there will be in the expences between hiring & purchasing Ox Teams for the service of the next Campaign, exhibited in your Estimate; I am cleary of opinion they ought to be purchased if it is practicable—but it will be necessary for you to arrange this matter with the Superintendant of Finances; as well as to take early & effectual Measures to procure the number...
Not doubting but that the statements, contained in the enclosed letter to Mr Pinckney, are grounded on facts, it appears to me to be as proper as it is spirited. Transcript, MHi : Pickering Papers. The transcript was certified as “A true copy” by Octavius Pickering, 22 Feb. 1866. The transcript of Pickering’s docket reads in part: “Approves the letter to Mr Pinckney of Oct. [22] relative to...
Your letters of the 12th & 13th instant, with their enclosures, were received by Mondays Mail, the 18th. The duplicate Commission for John Trumbull; the blank Commissions for the Revenue Officers; and the Patents passed by the Attorney General; are all signed, & returned under cover with this letter. The want of funds to carry on Commerce with the Indian Tribes (agreeably to a late Act of...
Congress having closed their late session without coming to any specified determination with respect to the Georgia sale of Lands and the application for the extinguishment of the Indian rights to those Lands; and not having expressed any sentiment respecting the nature of the predatory war between the southern Indians and the southern & southwestern frontiers of these United States, and the...
I have given the draughts of the letters to Messrs Pinckney—Humphreys—and Adams an attentive perusal, and approve of their contents. It might however be better, to soften some of the strong expressions in the letter which is addressed to the first of those characters; or to convey them in Cypher, lest they should (which is not improbable) fall into hands they are not intended for. and might it...
Your private & confidential letter of the 24th Ulto came duly, and safely to hand. Its contents, I confess, surprised me. But as men will view the same things in different lights, I would now , fain hope that the P——has caught the true one; and, that good will come from the Mission, which is about to depart. These are my wishes, and no one is more ardent in them; but I see nothing in the...
I thank you for the enclosure in your letter of the 1st instant, and for forwarding my letters to England, under cover to Mr King. Since the receipt of the above, General Pinckney has given me the whole of Major Mountf[l]orence’s letter to him. Surely La Fayette will not come here on such an errand, and under such circumstances as are mentioned in that letter. And yet—I believe he will, if the...
I have to request you will as soon as possible, give me an Estimate of all those things in your Department, (noting the expence of each in the best manner you are able) which will be requisite to enable the Army to take the field and to prosecute vigorous operations, in case the War should continue another Campaign; in this Estimate I would have comprehended particularly, the means of...
Your favor of the 5th instt with its enclosures, and also one of prior date, forwarding (at the request of Doctr Edwards) a Pamphlet from Sir John Sinclair have come duly to hand. For your kindness in sending these, & particularly for the information given in your letter of the 5th I feel myself very much obliged. The conduct of the French Directory towards General Pinckney is, I believe,...
The enclosed is approved, and if there is any Authentic ground to go upon, it ought to be extended to the case of Captn Jessup by strong & solemn expostulation or remonstrance. This conduct of G. Britain cannot, must not be suffered with impunity. ViMtvL .
As it is very desireable that the papers respecting the discontents of France should be got into Congress, and sent also to Mr Pinckney as soon as possible; if you mean to give the other Gentlemen a perusal of the Statement for the latter, it would save time if this was done as you are proceeding towards the close of that Statemt. It is questionable whether the present, and pressing avocations...