George Washington Papers
Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Parsons, Samuel Holden" AND Recipient="Varnum, James Mitchell"
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From George Washington to Brigadier Generals Samuel Holden Parsons, Enoch Poor, and James Mitchell Varnum, 29 March 1777

To Brigadier Generals Samuel Holden Parsons, Enoch Poor, and James Mitchell Varnum

Morris Town Mar. 29th 1777.

Sir

The Situation of our Affairs again compells me to call upon you in express, and positive Terms to hasten the Troops of your State (those Inlisted for the Continent I mean) to Peeks Kills, or head Quarters, without one moments loss of time. I do not mean by this to interupt the Inoculation of them; but, that nothing which can facilitate the March of the whole, or part (under proper Officers) may be left unattempted. I also mean that the Conduct of the Recruiting Officers should be closely attended to, as I have but too much reason to beleive that Idleness & dissipation engrosses too much of their time for the Public weal—Characters of this kind will be marked.

I shall expect to hear from you by the Post, every Week, & am Sir Yr Most Obedt Servt

Go: W——n

ADfS, addressed to Parsons and Varnum, DLC:GW; copy, addressed to Poor, in Robert Hanson Harrison’s writing, DLC:GW; Varick transcript, , addressed to Heath, Parsons, and Varnum DLC:GW; Varick transcript, , addressed to Poor DLC:GW. GW addressed the draft: “To Brigadrs Parsons & Varnum. The same to Genl Heath, directing the Troops of Massachusetts Bay to Peekskills & Tyconderoga agreeable to Former Orders.” The last part of the address is struck out; it reads: “also to Brigr Poor for New Hampshire Troops to March to Tyconderoga.”

The copy addressed to Poor indicates that the following version of this letter was sent to him: “The situation of our Affairs compells me again, to call upon you in the most pressing and positive terms to hasten and march the Troops of your State (those inlisted for the Continent I mean) to Ticonderoga without One moments loss of time. Nothing which can facilitate the marching of the whole or as many as are raised with proper Officers, going yourself, must be left unattempted. The conduct of the recruiting Officers should be closely attended to, there being great reason to beleive, that idleness and dissipation engrosses too much of their time for the public weal. Characters of this kind wheresoever they are found, will be marked. There is one thing more to which I must urge your most serious exertions, I mean the arming & equipping your Troops in the best manner you possibly can. You know how important this is, and I am persuaded the Convention will use every means to effect it.”

For the substantially different version of this letter that was sent to Heath, see GW to Heath, this date.

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