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    • Washington, George
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    • McHenry, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="McHenry, James"
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Presly Thornton, who is appointed a Captain in one of the Virginia Regiments, and in the list of Officers handed to you, is placed the first Captain in Colo. Bentley’s Regiment, and designated of Northumberland, informs me there has been a mistake in your office with respect to him; as a Relation of his, bearing the same names, & living in Caroline County, is understood by you to be the person...
The Post of Friday last brought me your dispatches of the 26th Ulto, with the Papers therein enclosed. The draught of a letter to the Agent of the Department of War, and the Instructions for the person proposed as a Deputy paymaster and Storekeeper in the State of Tennessee, are guarded, and proper. The only doubt remaining with me, is whether so many Officers, in that quarter, are realy...
In reply to your statement of the case of the Cadets, in the Corps of Artillerists and Engineers; I give it as my opinion that no promotion of them should take place at present, under the circumstances you have related. When I return to Philadelphia, it will be expected that you will bring forward the general plan for new modeling the Army agreeably to the late Act of Congress, at which time...
Not having sent to the Post office for several days your favor of the 20th inst. did not get to my hand till last night. I mention this circumstance as an apology for my not giving it an earlier acknowledgment. As you are pleased to ask my opinion of the consequences of an adjournment of your Convention until the meeting of ours, I shall [(]tho’ I have meddled very little in this political...
After a tour of at least 750 Miles (performed in Nineteen days) I returned to this place yesterday Afternoon, where I found your favor of the 31st Ulto intimating a resolution of Congress for calling me to Princeton, partly as it would seem, on my own account, and partly for the purpose of giving Aid to Congress; but the President not having sent on the Resolution I am left ignorant of the...
Let this letter be received with the same friendship and frankness, with which it is written, nothing would add more to the satisfaction this would give me, than your acceptance of the offer I am going to make you. Without further preface then, will you suffer me to nominate you to the office of Secretary of War? That I may give evidence of the candour I have professed above, I shall inform...
Your confidential and interesting letter of the 10th instant, came duly, and safely to hand. With the contents of which I have been stricken dumb; and I believe it is better that I should remain mute than to express any sentiment on the important matters which are related therein. I have, for sometime past, viewed the political concerns of the United States with an anxious, and painful eye....
You will not only consider this letter as a private one, but as a friendly one, from G: W. to J: M. And if the sentiments which you will find in it, are delivered with more freedom and candour than are agreeable, say so; not by implication only, but in explicit language; and I will promise to offend no more by such conduct; but confine myself (if occasion should require it) to an Official...
The enclosed letter from Mr Landais, transmitting one from you to him, was received by the last Post. Filling the vacancies in the Corps of Artillery, before the adjournment of the Senate, was suggested; but why, as it was not proposed by the military Act, that it should undergo any diminution, it was not done, my memory does not serve me. If there are more Cadets in that Regiment than Mr...
Immediately upon the Receipt of your letter of the 15th expressive of your wish to go to the Court of Versailles, or London as Official Secretary to the Embassy; I wrote to Messrs Livingston & Maddison on the subject, & mentioned you in warm terms to them—the Letters will go by this days Post. I thank you very sincerely for your kind congratulation on the approaching Peace; none can enjoy it...