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On receiving information, by a representative from the Inhabitants of Monmouth County, of the Cruel Murder of Captain Joshua Huddy of the Jersey State Troops by a party of Refugees from New York—I immediately informed the British Commander in Cheif, that unless he delivered up the perpretaters of that horrid deed I should be reduced to the disagreeable necessity of Retaliating. In answer to my...
Major Barber, who now holds a Commission in the Line of the Army at large, informs me that if the State of New Jersey, to which he belongs, will grant him the Commission of Captain in one of their Regiments, he can prevail upon Captain Anderson to resign in his favor, and that he can obtain the consent of all the Captain’s junior to Capt. Anderson to his being admitted into his place—If Major...
General Forman has applied to me for permission for Mrs Provost to go into New York in search of some property she has there, taking with her some person whom he would chuse, and from whom he makes no doubt of obtaining some very usefull intelligence on his return. As Mrs Provost & the Gentleman intended to go with her are both Citizens of New Jersey and as the ostensible reason of their going...
The enclosed Paper without signature, was a few days since put into my hands—As the information is not such as can be acted upon in a military way, I have thought it adviseable to transmit the same to your Excellency that any use you should think proper might be made of it. I have the honor to be. N.B. Information respecting John Smith said to have come to Morris Town for the purpose of...
On receiving Your Excellency’s favor of the 1st instant by Lord Stirling, I immediately set about making the necessary enquiry respecting the post said to be taken by the Enemy near Egg Harbour, and had I found the report well grounded, I should have concerted measures to have dislodged them—From the best information I have been able to obtain: particularly from General Forman who is now in...
I have the Honor to inform your Excellency that the Operations of the present Campaign are tendg very seriously to the Southward—& that a large Detatchment of the American Army—with the whole of the French Troops, are now on the March for Virginia—As the Article of Supplies for the Army which will be collected in that Quarter, & which will probably be large, will be a Matter of the last...
I regret being obliged to inform Your Excellency, that I find myself, at this late period, very little stronger than I was when the Army first moved out of their Quarters. Of the Militia which were required of the State of New Jersey, and which were to have joined me by the 15th of July, none have come in. I am informed that the first party which rendezvoused at Morris Town returned home for...
I am just now honored with your Excellency’s Favor of the 8th instant, informg me of the Offer of a Number of Volunteer Horsemen from your State. I applaud Sir! this Spirit, which gives me much Satisfaction in its Contemplation—The Gentlemen deserve my best Thanks for their Tenders of Service; which I beg leave to present to them thro’ the Hands of your Excellency. We are at present so much...
I flatter myself that proper Measures have been taken before this Time to procure the Number of Men for Continental & Militia Service required by my Letter of the 27th of May. In the calculation which had been made at Weathersfield of the Aid of Militia which would be necessary to Support the Operation which we have in View, I included sixteen Hundred from Pensylvania; but that State having...
I am honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 1st Instant. Upon examining the state of Ammunition, with reference to the proposed operations, it is found impossible to furnish more than fifteen Thousand Musket Cartridges for the Use of the State of New Jersey; especially at a time, when, we are obliged to sollicit a loan of Powder from the Eastern States, and when, the supply of lead in...
Last night I returned from Weathersfield, where I have had an interview with His Excellency the Count De Rochambeau: in consequence of which, the French Army will commence its march, to form a junction with ours on the North River, as soon as circumstances will admit. The accomplishment of the object which we have in contemplation, is of the utmost importance to America, and will in all...
Intelligence has been sent me by a Gentleman living near the enemy’s lines, and who has an opportunity of knowing what passes among them, that four parties had been sent out with orders to take or assasinate Your Excellency—Governor Clinton—Me and a fourth person, name not known. I cannot say that I am under apprehension on account of the latter, but I have no doubt they would execute the...
I was honored on my return from Rhode Island, with Your Excellencys Letter of the 1st Inst. together with the enclosures. Altho the discharging a single man from the service, is a very inconsiderable diminution of our force; Yet when the innumerable applications on this subject are taken into consideration, the unavoidable decrease of our Army if discharges are granted, the amazing difficulty...
Having been informed by Major General Dickinson that he was vested with powers, during the recess of the Legislature, to order out the Militia of the State. I have thought it expedient to desire him, at this juncture, to order the whole to be held in readiness, and to direct the Beacons and other signals of Alarm to be put in condition to afford the speediest communication to the Country of an...
New Windsor [ New York ] February 13, 1781 . Will discuss question of New Jersey prisoners with commissary of prisoners. Explains rules of exchange concerning militia and civilians. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress . ; LS , in the handwriting of H, William Livingston Papers, MS Division, New York Public Library.
I have received your letters of the 15th of December and 4th of February. I have been for some time past expecting the Commissary of Prisoners at Head Quarters; but he only arrived yesterday. I shall speak to him on the subject of your Excellency’s letter, and shall do every thing in my power to have justice done to the State. Tis no doubt reasonable it should be informed of the steps taken...
Ringwood [ New Jersey ] January 27, 1781 . Informs Livingston that the mutiny has been completely suppressed. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have the pleasure to inform your Excellency that the measures concerted for quelling the mutiny in the Jersey line were this morning carried into full execution. The mutineers were unexpectedly surrounded and awed into an unconditional surrender with little hesitation and no resistance. Two of the principal actors were executed on the spot, the rest pardonned—The spirit of mutiny seems now...
Having received information from Colo. Shreve of the defection of the Jersey line, and apprehending the most dangerous consequences may ensue unless an immediate stop shall be put to such horrid proceedings; I am now taking the most vigorous coercive measures for that purpose. I thought it necessary your Excellency should be apprised of my intention, in order to prevent any compromise being...
I have been honored with your Excellencys Letter of the 20th of Decr enclosing the Act for More effectually preventing Ilicit Trade &c.—and also with your favor of the 5th Inst. covering the Act for recruiting the Regts of New Jersey. When the present urgent business is dispatched, I shall attend to the several Matters containd in them. in the Mean time I have the honor to be DLC : Papers of...
I have been this day honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 15th You may be assured that I shall pursue the same measures this Winter, that I have invariably done heretofore—of sending every Horse that can possibly be spared, to a distance from the part of the Country which has been the seat of the Army during the Campaign, and as there will be fewer troops in Jersey this Winter than...
In mine of the 20th instant, I desired Your Excellency to discharge the whole of Colo. Seely’s Militia, except about one hundred for the purpose of a Guard at Morris Town, and to direct the September Class to hold themselves in readiness to come out upon the shortest notice. I would only wish you to continue those orders, but not to call out the Classes, except about one hundred Men for the...
I have been honor’d with your Excellency Letter of the 17th Inst. respecting the Troops under the command of Colo. Seely at Morris Town. It was not untill the rect of this, that I was made acquainted with the mode in which the Militia of Your State were to be called forth. And as the time for which the first Class was detached, is so far elapsed, that there is little probability of their being...
I have recd your Excellency’s favor of the 4th instant. As soon as I found that Sir Henry Clintons return from the Eastward had frustrated the enterprise which I had in contemplation, I directed Colo. Seely to return again to Morris town with the Militia and wrote to the commanding Officer of the State detachment in Monmouth to remain there. By a return from Colo. Seely of the 10th instant his...
From our present advises a considerable part of the Enemy’s force are gone to Rhode Island with a view of reducing the Armament from France. We can give them no succour from hence by detaching, on account of the distance and the difficulty there would be if not impracticability, of subsisting the Troops with bread. There is no other mode which promises them relief, so far as it may depend on...
I yesterday recd your Excellency’s favr of the 18th The intelligence which you were pleased to communicate to me had been previously transmitted to me by Genl Forman from Monmouth. I have not yet learned whether Sir Henry Clinton came with the Fleet or whether any or what number of troops were on board. The enemy remain in the same position upon the point. I have the Honor to be with the...
Springfield [ New Jersey ] June 18, 1780 . Is sending Brigadier General Henry Knox to present to the New Jersey legislature the “ill consequences” of their plan of “a draft from the Militia to serve for the campaign under their own Officers, instead of being incorporated with their Continental batallions.” Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have received advice which appears to be direct, that the Legislature of this State has determined on a draft to serve for the campaign under Their own officers, instead of being incorporated with their Continental batalions. This move, if adopted will be attended with so many inconveniencies, if followed by the States in general will be so absolutely pernicious to all the prospects of the...
I have been honored with yours of the 25th inclosing a Certificate from Mr Boudinot that Colo. Billop, after he was the first time taken by the Militia, was exchanged for Colo. Atlee a Continental Officer: But as Colonel Billop was the last time taken by a party of Continental troops and exchanged by Co⟨lo.⟩ Reynolds of the Militia, the account be⟨tween⟩ the State and Continent, so far as...
I have received your Excellencys letter of the 8th of this month, in favor of Capn Fitzrandolph. The Captains known zeal and usefulness entitle him to consideration; and I shall be very well pleased, if we can effect any thing towards his relief or releasement. At present commissioners from the enemy, and on our part, are sitting at Amboy, for the purpose of an exchange of prisoners. Should...
Since I had the Honor of writing to Your Excellency on the 26 Ulto—I have obtained Returns of Moylan’s & Sheldon’s Regiments of Light Dragoons, in which I find there are some Men belonging to the State of New Jersey. I inclose a particular Return of them, specifying the Terms of their engagements. I have the Honor to be with the greatest respect & esteem Your Excellency’s Most Obedt servant...
I was last night honored with your Excellency’s letter of the 22d. I had on the 20th transmitted you as accurate a Return as could then be obtained of the number of Men serving in the three Battalions of the State and in the additional Corps. I have since recd a Return of Major Lees Corps dated the 20th Decemr last, in which I find fifty non Commd Officers and privates belonging to the State...
[ Morristown, New Jersey ] February 19, 1780 . Explains why it would be inexpedient for a state to interfere in enlistment complaints. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have just received a letter from Mr Symmes one of the Supreme Judges of this state transmitting me a copy of a letter of the 14th instant ⟨to⟩ the Honorable the House of Assembly, on the subject of complaints made to him by soldiers in the Continental army of their being detained in service beyond the period for which they were engaged, and recommending the speedy direction and inquiry of...
I sincerely regret that any circumstances should render it necessary for you to make use of Mr Parson’s house instead of Perseppeny. If you think a guard would give you security in your own dwelling, I shall be happy to furnish you with one, and am Dr Sir &. Df , in James McHenry’s writing, DLC:GW ; Varick transcript , DLC:GW . GW wrote this word. GW is replying to Livingston’s letter to him...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] December 21, 1779 . States reasons that make it probable that British will attack Army’s winter quarters. Asks Livingston for support if this should happen. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] December 21, 1779 . States probability of an attack on the Army by the British. Asks Livingston to form a plan by which militia can be called into action on short notice. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Notwithstanding the enemy have been for some time past making demonstration of sending detatchments from New York, they still continue there with their whole collected force. On our part we have lately been obliged to march a considerable body of troops to the Southward, and a part of those which remain are daily leaving us from the expiration of their terms of service. These and many other...
The situation of our army at this time compared with that of the enemy makes it necessary we should be very much upon our guard. They have more than double our force collected at New York and we are mouldering away dayly. They have been some time past making a show of embarkation; but whether it is sincere or a mere feint to lull us into security is not easy to tell. But If they really design...
I have been favored with your Excellencys letter of the 7th. The Troops left at the No. Rivr & East of it & the large detatchments which we have been obliged to make to the Southward, and the times of service of so many of the troops nearly expiring, will unavoidably prevent me from affording that effectual cover to the frontier posts which I could wish. However, you may be assured, that I...
You have both obliged and amused me, by your communication of the 27th. I have not seen the piece to which you allude; but I should be more surprised had you been suffered to escape without paying a tax so antient and customary. When one is over rated in this way, it is very natural to complain, or to feel disgust at the ingratitude of the world; tho’ I beleive with you, that to persevere in...
The moment I was informed that the unexpected delays and difficulties which His Excellency the Count D’Estaing had met with to the Southward had rendered a cooperation in this quarter impracticable, I dismissed the Militia of the States of New York and Massachusetts, the only ones which were assembled at their places of rendezvous. Although the number of men required from the State of New...
West Point, October 4, 1779. Asks Livingston to instruct William Van Drill, a pilot, to join Major Henry Lee at Monmouth to assist D’Estaing. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
It is essential that some good pilots should be ready to go on Board the French fleet the moment it appears perfectly acquainted with the entrance into New York harbour. Wm Van Drill who resides in your State I am informed is one of the best that can be had. I shall be much obliged to your Excellency immediately to engage Mr Van Drill to go down to Monmouth and join Major Lee at English town...
[ West Point ] September 27, 1779 . States that if the French fleet is in reality off the coast, it will be necessary for states to supply men and provisions. LS , in writing of H, The Huntington Library, San Marino, California.
I yesterday recd your favr of the 3d Inst. I thank your Excellency for your attention to mine on the subject of Officers who have violated their paroles—and on the prospect of a scarcity of Flour. I have little doubt but that the farmers will thresh out part of their Grain earlier than usual, when influenced by a few virtuous individuals in each district. It hath been our constant practice...
I had not the Honor till two days ago, to receive Your Excellency’s Letter of the 5th Instant. The whole of the Officers belonging to the Three Jersey Regiments are employed on the Western expedition with General Sullivan, which circumstance puts it intirely out of my power, to comply with Your Excellency’s request for Officers for the recruiting service. If this were not the case, I should...
I have the pleasure to transmit Your Excellency the inclosed Copy of a Letter from Brigadr Genl Wayne, which this moment came to hand. I congratulate you upon our success—and what makes it still more agreable, from the report of Capn Fishbourn who brought me Genl Wayne’s Letter, the post was gained with but very inconsiderable loss on our part. I have not yet obtained the particulars of the...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] June 3, 1779 . Describes British troop movements and asks Livingston to alert militia. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
The enemy have been some time since in motion apparently with some capital design, and by my last intelligence had proceeded up the North River in force and had landed a considerable body in the vicinity of Kings ferry—These movements seem to look more immediately towards the Forts on the River; but the real object may very probably be to prevent the junction of our force and bend their whole...